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Books by Tom Tag



Steamship SS Portland Portland Gale

Pendleton Fort Mercer 1952 Chatham




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Fall Sale Hundreds of Arcadia Publishing Titles!

 

Sale! 

All of our Arcadia Publishing Company Lighthouse, Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard titles in stock, dated 2015 or earlier are 30% off suggested retail price.  No other discounts may apply. 

All pre-2016 Arcadia titles in the listings below and on Page 2 are included in the above sale. Or you may email for a list. 

 

1747. Mattson, Jan. CALIFORNIA LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS – A Look at Lighthouse Life Through the Eyes of the People Who Lived It. Goat Rock. 2016. 144p. Stiff wraps. 8 ½” x 10 ½”. Filled with photos, many never before published, of lighthouse keepers and family members. In the late 1940’s the author’s relative, a talented painter and professional photographer, began photographing the keepers tending their apparatus at nearby light stations and soon had compiled a photographic history of the life at stations up and down the coast of California from San Diego to Cape Mendocino. These wonderful black and white images present a rare view into the light keeper’s life when their work was still a necessity. No matter what part of the country you are from, these views of the men and women tending their equipment and their stories will surely be of interest. (M). Published at $29.95. Our price $28. 

We have purchased the publisher’s last remaining stock of this title. There will be no more after these have sold.

6275s. Ralph Shanks, Wick York, Lisa Woo Shanks, editor. THE U. S. LIFE-SAVING SERVICE - HEROES, RESCUES AND ARCHITECTURE OF THE EARLY COAST GUARD. 1996. Petaluma , CA. 262p. Winner of the first Foundation for Coast Guard History Award for Best Book on Coast Guard History, this long heralded work by Ralph Shanks and Wick York is once again available. Filling a longtime void in the chronicles of the Life-Saving Service, this book is the result of two decades of research by these highly respected maritime historians. In 272 large format pages, the authors present unforgettable stories of the surfmen and their unsurpassed bravery. Unique to this work is the authors coverage of the architecture of each of the stations across the country. Using over 400 rare photos from the Library of Congress and other historic sources, the authors provide a station by station look at the architectural features that make them such a unique and unforgettable piece of our history. Considered the best reference on the U.S. Life Saving Service on the market. (M).   Softcover $29.95 while they last. 1 Hard cover available $89.95.

1786. Hargrove, James L. and Carol A. Talley. Cape St. George Lighthouse and Apalachicola Bay. Arcadia. 2017. 96p. Soft wraps. With over 122 vintage photographs. The beacon of the historic Cape St. George Lighthouse still guides mariners into Apalachicola Bay. Sheltered from the Gulf of Mexico by a string of barrier islands, the port flourished as the only site in Florida on a river that is navigable for over 300 miles to the fall line at Columbus, Georgia, Apalachicola’s sister city. Generations of lighthouse keepers were bound to St. George Island and its great bay by an intense sense of duty to sustain seagoing commerce and a love for a place where they could raise their families in freedom. When the lighthouse foundation washed away in 2005 after a very active hurricane season and a final surge from Hurricane Wilma, residents took action to salvage and rebuild the historic lighthouse. Visitors may still climb the lighthouse tower, surrounded by the bricks that were first laid in 1852. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1880’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published. (M). $21.99.

 

1763. Bleyer, Bill. The Fire Island Lighthouse: Long Island’s Welcoming Beacon. 2017. History Press. 160p. Soft wraps. This is the first complete history of the important national landmark at Fire Island. The author begins with the site, from the shipwrecks offshore dating from colonial times that prompted construction of the first lighthouse on Fire Island in 1826; the inadequacies of that lighthouse that led to construction of a new taller tower in 1858; the development of improved lighthouse illumination apparatus including the Fresnel lens; the Fire Island lightships that were anchored offshore to augment the new lighthouse; how the lighthouse was shut down by the Coast Guard at the end of 1973 and replaced by a light on the water tower at Robert Moses State Park; how the structures on the closed site deteriorated and the Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society was formed in 1982 to restore the property and re-lit the tower in 1986; how the original Fresnel lens was brought back from Philadelphia and displayed in a new building in 2011; and the society’s future plans for bringing back additional artifacts for display. The book is filled with dozens of historical photographs, some never published before, and a 16-page insert of new color photographs by retired Newsday photographer Audrey C. Tiernan showing the restored lighthouse, keeper’s quarters and first-order Fresnel lens in all their glory. Well done. (M). $21.99. Available May 10. (x)

1753. Seguin, Marc. For Want of a Lighthouse: Building the Lighthouses of Eastern Lake Ontario 1828–1914. Trafford Publishing. 2015. 566p. Soft wraps. No safe harbours for steamboats or sailing vessels could be found along an isolated 70-mile stretch of eastern Lake Ontario, dominated by the irregular-shaped Prince Edward County peninsula. Frequent storms, rocky reefs and sandy shoals were among the many dangers facing 19th century mariners. So many shipwrecks mark one narrow and shallow underwater ridge in the region that it became known as the graveyard of Lake Ontario. It was on these shores, from Presqu ile Bay to Kingston harbour and along the Bay of Quinte, that a network of more than forty lighthouses and light towers was built between 1828 and 1914. For Want Of A Lighthouse presents a sweeping look at the social and technological changes which marked the era, and brings to life the people, politics and the hardships involved in the construction of these essential aids to navigation. Through the use of extensive archival material and more than 100 maps and photographs, Marc Seguin documents the vital role these lighthouses played in the building of a nation. There is now a race against time to save the few original towers that are still standing. All of the author’s profits from the sale of this book will go towards the preservation of these remaining lighthouses. (M). $26.44. (x)

 

 

1734. Riddle, Mary Ellen. Outer Banks Shipwrecks: Graveyard of the Atlantic. Arcadia. 2017. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 185 vintage photographs. Ever since ships began navigating the coast of North Carolina, the area has maintained a reputation for being dangerous. Today, the region that stretches from the Currituck Outer Banks south to Bogue Banks is referred to as the “Graveyard of the Atlantic.” From the 1585 grounding of the English ship Tiger off the Outer Banks to the 2012 loss of the Bounty, more than 2,000 shipwrecks have occurred in the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Weather, geography, war, piracy, and human error have all contributed to this dense shipwreck zone. The stories behind the shipwrecks illustrate the best and worst of mankind, showing courage and compassion as well as the atrocities of war. This history informs readers about commerce, technology, war, environment, maritime life, and the complexity of the human element. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1880’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published. (M). $21.99.

1758. Krueger, Steve. Lighthouses of Lake Winnebago. Arcadia. 2017. 96p. Soft wraps. With over 122 vintage photographs. Winnebago has a rich history as a major settlement area in the Midwest, and a significant part of its times gone by involved water transportation for both commerce and passengers. Throughout its history, the 137,700-acre lake has been home to six current lighthouses, two navigation lanterns that have long disappeared from the landscape, and one that was scheduled to be built but never came to fruition. History has forgotten a few, but Lighthouses of Lake Winnebago will take you on a trip around the largest lake within Wisconsin’s borders and show you the familiar, while introducing you to the forgotten. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1880’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published. (M). $21.99. (x)

 

1735. Hendrickson, Dyke. Nautical Newburyport: A History of Captains, Clipper Ships and the Coast Guard. 2017. The History Press. 144p. Soft wraps. With 56 Black And White images. Newburyport was once the most dangerous harbor on the East Coast and one of its most prosperous. Local captains and sailors led the nation to battle during the American Revolution and founded the U.S. Coast Guard. They sent vessels to Bombay, the gold rush and the farthest reaches of the world. Author Dyke Hendrickson explores the perfection of the clipper ship, the city’s famous Federalist mansions and the bold adventures from the Age of Sail. Follow the men and women of Newburyport into battle, into gales and into fortune—or ruin. Great reading. (M). $21.99.

 

1728. Milmore, Art. And The Sea Shall Have Them All. Self published. 2016. 234p. Soft wraps. Over 20 miles out in Massachusetts Bay, lies the wreck of the palatial side-wheel steamer SS Portland, tragically lost in the horrific gale of November 26 and 27th., 1898. The ship sank with all hands, was witnessed by no-one and disappeared without trace. The Portland Steamship Company started as the Portland Steam Packet Company in 1844, and was later consolidated into the Eastern Steamship Company. One of their vessels, the side-wheel steamship Portland, was one of the largest and most palatial vessels afloat in New England during the 1890s. Built in 1889, the steamer ran between Portland, Maine and Boston until its loss in 1898. The Portland's loss was New England's greatest steamship disaster prior to the year 1900. The 1898 gale would become known as The Portland Gale. The author began his research with the late author and historian Edward Rowe Snow. “The trail ran dry in the 1970s”, the author explained, “and Ed asked me if I ever found the rest of the material we needed on the Portland, would I publish it…. This was to be Snow's 98th book, but time ran out.” Edward Rowe Snow died in 1982 and now, capping 32 years of research, the author presents what he believes is the definitive story of the SS Portland’s history and the events of that fateful day in 1898. Extremely interesting, filled with the results of years of interviews, accounts of the day and much more. Quite different from other books on this subject and worth the read. (M). $29.95. (x)

7340e,f. Field, Van. WRECKS AND RESCUES ON LONG ISLAND - THE STORY OF THE U. S. LIFE SAVING SERVICE. 1997. 179p. Soft wraps. Over 188 vintage photographs. I have once again found a copy of this long out of print work by Mr. Field. Filling a longtime void in the chronicles of the Life-Saving Service on Long Island, this book is the result of decades of research. In 179 large format pages, the author presents unforgettable stories of the surfmen and their unsurpassed bravery. Unique to this work are the 180 wonderful vintage photographs of the stations and the men who served along this stormy coast. In this interesting chronicle, the author provide a station by station look at the buildings, the crews and the rescues they performed that make them such a unique and unforgettable piece of our history. Filled with wonderful vintage photos. Clean, tight, only lightly used. Extremely difficult to find. (M). $59.95. (x)

 

16236. Lehrer, Henry R. Flying the Beam - Navigating the Early US Airmail Airways 1917-1941. Purdue University Press. 2014. 226 pages. Soft wraps. With air travel a regular part of daily life in North America, we tend to take the infrastructure that makes it possible for granted. However, the systems, regulations, and technologies of civil aviation are in fact the product of decades of experimentation and political negotiation, much of it connected to the development of the airmail as the first commercially sustainable use of airplanes. From the lighted airways of the 1920s through the radio navigation system in place by the time of World War II, this book explores the conceptualization and ultimate construction of the initial US airways systems. The daring exploits of the earliest airmail pilots are well documented, but the underlying story of just how brick-and-mortar construction, radio research and improvement, chart and map preparation, and other less glamorous aspects of aviation contributed to the system we have today has been understudied. Flying the Beam traces the development of aeronautical navigation of the US airmail airways from 1917 to 1941. Chronologically organized, the book draws on period documents, pilot memoirs, and firsthand investigation of surviving material remains in the landscape to trace the development of the system. The author shows how visual cross-country navigation, only possible in good weather, was developed into all-weather "blind flying." The daytime techniques of "following railroads and rivers" were supplemented by a series of lighted beacons (later replaced by radio towers) crisscrossing the country to allow nighttime transit of long-distance routes, such as the one between New York and San Francisco. While navigational electronics have changed greatly over the years, actually "flying the beam" has changed very little. (M). $38.95. (w)

1701. Grayson, Matthew S. Lighthouses, Cutters and Lifeboat Stations: Life and Times of Rodger D. Dewey, BMCM 28 years in the United States Coast Guard. 2016. 38p. Soft wraps. Follow the twenty-eight years of service and memories of Rodger D. Dewey, who would retire as a master chief boatswain’s mate E-9. As a young man from Denver, Colorado, seventeen-year-old Dewey joined the United States Coast Guard in 1948 and made the Coast Guard his life. Follow the training, lessons learned, funny stories, and a true love of being a shallow-water sailor. His duty stations included Humboldt Bay LBS, St. George Reef LH, San Luis Obispo LH, Marshall Islands, Pt. Reyes LBS. Cutter assignments included CGC Gresham, Taney, Escanaba, Cahoone, Active, Point Chico, Point Sal. Rather short but interesting account. (M). $21.99. 

 

20260g. Mobley, Joe A., SHIP ASHORE! The U. S. Lifesavers of Coastal North Carolina . Raleigh . 1994. 185p. Soft wraps. This interesting and readable volume presents one of the first comprehensive accounts of the history and work of the life-savers of coastal North Carolina . The Life-Saving Service began operations there in 1874 and ultimately twenty-nine stations would stand along the treacherous Tar Heel coastline from Wash Woods to Oak Island . Wonderfully illustrated with numerous vintage photographs and engravings. A most interesting and detailed work. Out of print, difficult to find. (M). $28.

16233. Thurlow, Sandra and Timothy Dring. U.S. Life-Saving Service: Florida's East Coast. Arcadia. 2016. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 200 vintage photographs. Ten houses of refuge, unique to Florida s east coast, were constructed by the US Life-Saving Service between 1876 and 1886. When ships traveling along the almost uninhabited coast were grounded or wrecked on reefs, survivors often made it to land but had no way to reach civilization. House of refuge keepers and their families provided food and shelter to victims of shipwrecks. The keepers lives were monotonous but punctuated with the excitement of an occasional shipwreck. The US Life-Saving Service provided the framework on which the east coast of Florida developed. With the establishment of the US Coast Guard in 1915, the Life-Saving Service houses of refuge became Coast Guard stations." This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1880’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of the Life-Saving Service in Florida through photos and text. Filled with early views. (M). $21.99.

 

16220. Morrison, James. Alcohol, Boat Chases, and Shootouts!: How the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs Fought Rum Smugglers and Pirates. Part I 1919-1924. Royal Exchange Publications. 2008. 329p. Soft wraps. A true story of rum smugglers, gangsters, pirates, and the Coast Guard's effort to stop them, with a bit of the boat chases, corrupt politicians, conspiracies, violence, and drunken sailors that prevailed during the time. In the 1920s, when transporting and selling alcohol was mostly illegal, brave men went to sea in an effort to stop rum smugglers and pirates. The effort proved far more challenging than anyone could imagine. The author spent two years sifting through microfilm and government documents to piece together this epic story, buried by the sands of time. Amazingly, these true stories of sea battles and chases are not from 200 years ago--they are from the 20th Century! Alcohol, Boat Chases, and Shootouts tells the real stories of how the Coast Guard, Customs, Prohibition agents, and police attempted to enforce Prohibition on the water. Good information too about the Coast Guard equipment, stations and operations of the day. (M). Published at $29. Our price $22.95. (w)

16222. Demeter, Andrew. Chelsea Clocks: A Technical Manual. Demeter Publications, Ltd., November, 2016. 203p. Soft wraps. Cover Photo: Leonard Taube, retired master watchmaker for Chelsea Clock Company. Reference includes photos and parts lists for sixteen of the most popular Marine & Ships Bell movements made by Chelsea Clock Co. and several with schematics. Includes Models E (Chelsea’s earliest marine movement), 12E, 12EI, 13E, 14E, 16E, 17E, F, K, 17K, L, 4L, M, 4M, V1 and V2. Eight pages listing Interchangeable Parts alphabetically and separately by part number for Models E, 12E, 17E, F, K (Boston) 17K and 18K.Includes a brief history of Chelsea escapements and an Escapement Comparison Table that identifies the type of escapement used in each clock with numerous blueprints of individual escapement parts.  Identifies the parts by their Chelsea factory number as well as the Waltham factory number. Parts diagrams for regulators that are found missing on clocks as well as the USN Mark I Deck clock (chrome) hinge and back plates. Chelsea Collectors and Waltham watchmakers who are seeking or selling Chelsea clock parts will now be able to cite the part by name and factory number for the most common Chelsea models on the market. Limited quantity available. (M). $79.95. (w)

 

16202. Johnson, Leland R. Ph.D. Heroes at the Falls: Louisville's Lifesavers. Edited by Charles E. Parrish. Butler Books. 2014. 128 pages. Large 8 ½” x 11”. Life-Saving Station #10, docked at the wharf in Louisville, Kentucky, is a unique installation in American history. As the only such federal installation on the inland waterways, this rare floating life-saving station guarded against navigational disasters from 1882 until 1972. The only other similar life-saving station in the country was the City Point Station in Boston Harbor. This station in Louisville was lobbied for and manned by locally-grown heroes who maintained a constant vigil to protect vessels and their passengers, cargoes and crews from destruction on the jagged rocks of the Falls of the Ohio River in the days prior to modern lock and dam systems. This Falls area was considered the most dangerous point along the 981 miles of the Ohio River. From the time it was authorized by Congress in 1881 until 1915, thousands of people were rescued from the treacherous falls area and more than $5 million worth of boats, possessions and cargo were saved. The Coast Guard would continue this fine record at the station until 1972, when the completion of the newer McAlpine Locks and Dam  submerged most of the Falls and now required that all boat traffic pass through the canal and locks instead of passing over the Falls. The third floating station remains today, with its white double-decker building and watchtower aboard - the last of three river rescue stations at the site. Dr. Johnson tells, for the first time, the compelling story of the U.S. Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard stations at this site, and the remarkable crews who saved thousands of lives, countless numbers of boats, and millions of dollars of cargoes at the Falls of the Ohio. (M). Published at $20. Our price $18.50. (x)

Just in! Wonderful early photos and history:

16122. Snowman, Sally R. and James G. Thompson. Boston Light. Arcadia. 2016. 128p. Hard cover. With over 200 vintage photographs. On September 14, 1716, Boston Light became the first lighthouse established in Colonial America. With many ships foundering in the treacherous waters of the Massachusetts harbor, there was a great need for navigational aid. At night and during storms, it was difficult to discern the entrance to the main shipping channel of Nantasket Roads, situated between the Brewster islands and the town of Hull. The ledges had become a graveyard for ships, resulting in great loss to human life and cargoa deterrent to European colonization efforts. Ship captains and merchants petitioned the colonial government for a lighthouse to be erected on Little Brewster Island as a way of safe passage to the inner harbor. Three hundred years later, Boston Light continues to serve its purpose. Today, the lighthouse is protected by an ever-present Coast Guard civilian keeper and a cadre of specially trained Coast Guard Auxiliary volunteer assistant keepers. Sally Snowman is the 70th Keeper of Boston Light. With her husband, Jay Thomson, they have done extensive historical research on this distinctive piece of Americana. Highly recommended for readers interested in history, New England, lighthouses, sea stories. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1870’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of this light station through photos and text. Filled with early views. (M). $24.99. Our price $22.

16171. Baltrusis, Sam. Haunted Boston Harbor. 2016. The History Press. 144p. Soft wraps. With 56 b/w images. Ghosts lurk in the waters near Boston’s historic seaport, haunting the secluded islands scattered throughout the harbor. Boston Harbor brims with the restless spirits of pirates, prisoners and victims of disease and injustice. Uncover the truth behind the Lady in Black on Georges Island. Learn about the former asylums on Long Island that inspired the movie Shutter Island, and dig up the skeletal secrets left behind by the Woman in Scarlet Robes. From items flying off the shelves at a North End cigar shop to the postmortem cries of tragedy at the centuries-old Boston Light on Little Brewster, author Sam Baltrusis breathes new life into the horrors that occurred in the historic waters surrounding Boston. Great reading. (M). $19.99. (x)

 

1697. Willoughby, Malcom F. The U.S. Coast Guard In World War II. Naval Institute Press. 2016. 348p. Soft wraps. This intimate view of the U.S. Coast Guard's dramatic World War II record has long been considered a classic. First published in 1957 and out of print for years, the book is now available in paperback. Handsomely illustrated with more than two hundred photographs, the book serves as a unique memento of one of the most illustrious periods in the Coast Guard's two hundred year history. The author offers a story replete with incidents of devotion far beyond the call of duty--daring rescues, adventurous high-sea missions, heroic combat action--to clearly demonstrate the vital role the service played in the Allied war effort. A seasoned World War I veteran who joined the Coast Guard Temporary Reserve in 1942, Malcolm Willoughby has covered every aspect of the Coast Guard's involvement in the war at sea, in the air, and at home. From the invasion of Normandy, where Coast Guardsmen landed thousands of Americans and rescued some 1,500 stranded in the surf, to Guadalcanal, where they rescued three companies of Marines trapped on the beach, this chronicle vividly recounts these well-documented operations and little-known stories of individual triumphs and tragedies as well. (M). $48.95. (x)

        

1288. Roberts, Cheryl Shelton and Bruce. NORTH CAROLINA LIGHTHOUSES – Stories of History and Hope. 2011. 152p. Soft wraps. Limited Edition signed and numbered #895 of 1500 copies by the authors. This limited coffee table genre but with lots of information will be sure to please lovers of the lighthouses on the North Carolina coastline. A stunning, full-color celebration of some of the world’s most famous lighthouses, the shoreline they stand on, and the people who have worked to protect them, with the lore and history of North Carolina’s seafaring past coming to life in the text by Cheryl Shelton-Roberts and photographs by noted photographer Bruce Roberts. From Cape Hatteras to Bodie Island Light, North Carolina is home to some of the most famous lighthouses in the world, and with this book, beautiful photography and engaging text come together to bring alive, as never before, the lore and history of North Carolina’s seafaring past. But this is not just a tribute to the sentinels that dot the North Carolina shoreline today, North Carolina Lighthouses also offers a glimpse into the Golden Age of the Lighthouse System and makes a compelling case for preserving these buildings and their stories for posterity. WELL DONE ! Very very interesting, beautiful mix of old and recent photos, great info. Very interesting reading. (M). $29.95. 

 

24374. Snow, Edward Rowe. WOMEN OF THE SEA. Beverly . 2004. DJ. New Centennial Edition published in recognition of the centennial of Mr. Snow’s birth in August 1902. Updated by Jeremy D’Entremont and with a new forward by Dorothy Snow Bicknell. First published in 1962, this important work and now has been meticulously updated as more and more readers discover Mr. Snow’s wealth of titles on the subject once again. Told in Mr. Snow’s usual readable style, here the author recounts the stories of many of the women of the sea including Hannah Burgess, who navigated her husband’s clipper ship safely to port after his death and the widowed Hsi Kai Ching who took command of her husband’s pirate fleet. Certainly one of the most readable books on the subject ever written. by this well known story teller. (M). Published at $19.95.    Special Sale Price $8.95. (x)

 

See the video book trailer for Brilliant Beacons on YouTubehttps://youtu.be/QUgQVFOjX2s

1601. Dolin, Eric Jay. Brilliant Beacons - A History of the American Lighthouse. 2016. 448p. Stiff wraps. An extraordinary work of historical detection and originality, Brilliant Beacons vividly reframes America’s history through the development of its lighthouses. In a work rich in maritime lore and brimming with original historical detail, Eric Jay Dolin, the best-selling author of Leviathan, presents the most comprehensive history of American lighthouses ever written, telling the story of America through the prism of its beloved coastal sentinels. Set against the backdrop of an expanding nation, Brilliant Beacons traces the evolution of America’s lighthouse system, highlighting the political, military, and technological battles fought to illuminate the nation’s hardscrabble coastlines. In rollicking detail, Dolin treats readers to a memorable cast of characters including the penny-pinching Treasury official Stephen Pleasonton, who hamstrung the country’s efforts to adopt the revolutionary “Fresnel Lens,” and presents tales both humorous and harrowing of soldiers, saboteurs, ruthless egg collectors, and most importantly, the light-keepers themselves. Richly supplemented with over 100 photographs and illustrations throughout, Brilliant Beacons is the most original history of American lighthouses in many decades. 112 illustrations; 8 pages of color. (M). Published at $29.95. 

Sale Price $21.95 plus $4.50 media mail. (x)

  Image Copyright Walt Disney Studio Pictures

1686. (DVD) The Finest Hours: The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue. DVD. Run time 114 min. PG-13. Based on the extraordinary true story of the greatest smallboat rescue in Coast Guard history, THE FINEST HOURS is a tale of courage, loyalty and honor in the face of overwhelming odds. When a massive storm strikes off the coast of Cape Cod, it rips a T-2 oil tanker in half, trapping more than 30 sailors on its rapidly sinking stern. As BM1 Bernie Webber (Chris Pine) and his crew set out in the station 36-foot motor lifeboat to save them, Chief Engineer Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck) struggles to buy his men more time. Packed with heroic larger-than-life action and driven by the men's faith in their mission, themselves and one another, THE FINEST HOURS is a triumph. The Finest Hours has incredible and astonishing true-to-life heroism and action-packed rescue scenes. This marvelous and terrifying yarn ( Los Angeles Times ) deserves a place as a classic of survival at sea ( The Boston Globe). In the days following the ordeal, twenty-one Coast Guardsmen involved in multiple rescue missions would be decorated. Movie is based upon the original 1985 account by Coxswain BM1 Bernard Webber. $29.95. (x)

16111. Quidley, Dallas Edward. The Lighthouse Keeper's Son. LifeRich. 2013. 151p. Soft wraps. The Lighthouse Keeper's Son shares a chronological collection of several short stories recalling author Dallas E. Quidley Jr's life as the son of a lighthouse keeper. Light Stations tended by family members included Drum Point, Neuse River, Cape Hatteras and Bodie Island as well as lightships and various Coast Guard assignments. With modern marine safety technology, the lighthouse way of life has slipped away, even though many lighthouses still stand and are open to the public. Recalling his personal experiences, Quidley reveals various aspects of life as a lighthouse keeper and Coast Guardsman. The US Lighthouse Service and the US Coast Guard have historically been foremost in safe marine navigation. The keepers were highly qualified and dedicated mariners-people who were truly the salt of the earth. In Quidley's family, three generations plus one son tried to live up to that reputation. This collection of personal narratives offers stories of Quidley's life before and after his time in the lighthouses with his family. Through these stories of events and people, a portrait of a strong, hardworking, Christian and family man emerges. The Lighthouse Keeper's Son chronicles a life well lived and the cherished memories of a man who has experienced his life to the fullest. (M). $24.95. (x)

1605. Williams, Joseph A. Seventeen Fathoms Deep - The Saga of the Submarine S-4 Disaster. 2015. Chicago Review Press. 304p, Cloth 6 x 9. December 17, 1927, the USS"S-4"submarine sank to the ocean floor off Provincetown, Cape Cod with all forty crew members aboard after being accidentally rammed by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Paulding. The rescue divers could hear the crew tapping out a message in Morse code: "Is there any hope?" Only six sailors in the forward torpedo room survived the initial collision, trapped in the compartment with the oxygen running out. Author and naval historian Joseph A. Williams has delved into never-revealed archival sources to tell the compelling narrative of the"S-4"disaster. How, for the first time, Navy deep sea divers struggled to rescue the imprisoned men, while a winter storm raged at the surface, creating some of the worst diving conditions in American history. Circumstances were so terrible that one diver, Fred Michels, became trapped in the wreckage while trying to attach an air hose to the sunken sub. The rescuer now needed to be rescued. It was only through the bravery of a second diver, Thomas Eadie, that Michels was saved. This is the only full-length history of the"S-4"disaster. This was the first attempt to rescue survivors stranded aboard a modern submarine and, as detailed in "Seventeen Fathoms Deep," lessons learned during this great tragedy moved the US Navy to improve submarine rescue technology, which resulted in subsequent successful rescues of other downed submariners." (M). $26.95. 

 

1699. Dunn, Bill. Sea Girt Lighthouse. Arcadia 2016. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 200 vintage photographs. In the New Jersey shore community of Sea Girt, where Commodore Robert Stockton’s oceanfront mansion had a porch as long as a ship’s deck from which he surveyed the waters, a lighthouse was built in 1896. Sea Girt Lighthouse illuminated a dark space, providing a crucial guiding light to passing ships. The station would become a lighthouse of distinction and innovation. In 1920, it was the first land-based lighthouse with a radio beacon transmitter, enabling ships to navigate through fog. During World War II, the Coast Guard extinguished the light, stood watch in the tower, and patrolled the beaches. No matter the mission, the lighthouse met every challenge. In 1956, the town acquired the decommissioned lighthouse, making it the library and recreation center. By 1981, however, the building needed extensive repairs and was at risk of being sold. Concerned residents formed the Sea Girt Lighthouse Citizens Committee to “save our lighthouse.” And they did, restoring it, preserving its history, and keeping it busy with community events. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1870’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of this light station through photos and text. Filled with early views. (M). $21.99. (x)

16115. Zoss, Neel R., Whalebacks – Wrecked, Scrapped, Lost & Forgotten. Avery. 2016. 262p. Soft wraps. last years of the 19th century, the Duluth Harbor, situated between the sister cities of Duluth, Minnesota, and Superior, was the birthplace of a bold and innovative and decidedly odd-looking class of Great Lakes barges and steamships known as whalebacks. Capt. Alexander McDougall and his American Steel Barge Company built the curved-decked, snout-nosed whalebacks on the shores of the harbor, first at Duluth’s Rice’s Point and later in Howard’s Pocket at Superior. The vessels were a radical departure, in design, form, and construction, from the standard shipbuilding concepts of the era but proved themselves more than capable as a number of the boats sailed the Great Lakes and the seaboards of America until the 1960s. All the whalebacks are gone now—either scrapped or sunk—with one exception. After sailing the lakes for more than 70 years, the last whaleback, the SS Meteor, returned home to Superior in 1972 and is now continuing its service as a magnificent maritime museum on Barker’s Island. (M). $17.95. (x)

11372. HABS Co-Author Alan Giagnocavo. Lighthouses - A Close-Up Look : An Intimate Tour Through Historic Photos and Architectural Drawings. Fox Chapel Publishing (2011). 176p. Soft wraps. The Historic American Building Survey (HABS) and the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) collections are dedicated to preserving America’s architectural history by gathering a diverse range of historic photographs and architectural designs of buildings throughout the country. Along with over 90 vintage and recent photos of lighthouses across the country from the HABS/HAER website, this book includes over 50 detailed architectural plans that feature the internal and external structure of the lighthouses. In this book, readers will find unique lighthouse structures, such as the Port Mahon Lighthouse, which hovers over the water on pilings and the Portland Breakwater Lighthouse, which contains architectural details similar to those found on the White House. Not to worry, though, the towering buildings typically associated with the word lighthouse can also be found on these pages. Color photos, plans, GPS coordinates and a brief history of many of the locations are also included. Well worth reading. (M). Published at $19.95. Reduced $8.95.

26249. Clark, Admont. LIGHTHOUSES OF CAPE COD, MARTHA’S VINEYARD, NANTUCKET – Their History and Lore. Beverly . 2006. DJ. 244p. With a chapter devoted to each light station, this is surely the most interesting and comprehensive book on the subject. Profusely illustrated with fine early photographs and engravings. The author traces the history of each lighthouse from the beginning, the story of the construction and changes over the years, and of the men and women who lived and worked at the stations. The author’s emphasis on stories of the people who lived and worked in the lighthouses makes this book most enjoyable - readers are infused with a sense of daily life at each lighthouse, while also reading the extraordinary events that make their histories. Wonderful reading and most well done. (F). Published at $36.95. Sale Price $12.95.

10374. Witt, Sonny. Drawn to the Light – The History of Cape Canaveral and its People. 241p. Soft wraps. The history of Cape Canaveral from 500 - 1945 is very sketchy or non existent. The Ais Indians controlled Cape Canaveral until their disappearance in about 1715. From that time the Cape lay uninhabited until about 1847 when the Lighthouse Establishment arrived to search for a location to build a lighthouse. About eighty years after the Ais Indians disappeared from Cape Canaveral , a hand full of settlers arrived. Their objective was to raise families, settle homesteads and operate the Cape Canaveral Lighthouse. Interestingly enough, the second lighthouse keeper left Cape Canaveral because of fears of raids by Indians and the third keeper came to the cape because Indians caused his family to leave their homestead near Fort Pierce. Mills O. Burnham and his wife Mary should be credited for, but not completely, populating Cape Canaveral with the Burnham family members and the operation the Cape Canaveral Lighthouses between 1853 and 1939 when the Coast Guard took ownership. Burnham or a member of his family saw the beautiful state-of-the-art Iron Lighthouse first assembled. He watched, as it got its beautiful black and white day marks. His son-in-law became the first postmaster of Cape Canaveral. A cousin watched the Iron Lighthouse be disassembled and moved to its current location. Thoroughly illustrated with hundreds of photographs. A detailed account of this little known but important light station and the life there. (M). Published at $26.95. Sale Price $17.95.

1500. Follansbee, Joe. The Fyddeye Guide to America's Lighthouses - 750+ Lighthouses, Lightships, and Life-Saving Stations You Can Visit Today! Fyddeye. United States. 2012. 224p. Soft wraps. Foreword by Jeremy D'Entermont. The Fyddeye Guide to America’s Lighthouses makes your travel planning easier by showing you hundreds of fascinating lighthouses, life-saving stations and lightships that you can visit today on the east coast, Great Lakes, Gulf coast, and the west coast, including Alaska and Hawaii. From remote islands in Maine to the metropolises of southern California, you’ll discover the historic structures that have inspired travelers for millennia. You can get close to virtually all of America’s lighthouses, and many allow you to climb to the top and stay as long as a month in historic buildings. More than 750 lighthouses, life-saving stations and lightships are conveniently organized by coastal region and state. Included are brief histories and complete contact information, including website, email address, and phone. Includes too three maps with suggested itineraries for discovering lighthouses in New England, Michigan, and California, notes on whether you can stay overnight on the lighthouse grounds, possibly in the keepers’ historic quarters, and more. Chapters also on lightships and historic life-saving stations, including availability of overnight accommodations. More than 40 images of many from coast to coast. (M). $19.95. Sale Price $9.95.

29185-mv. Tougias, Michael and Casey Sherman. The Finest Hours: The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue. 2015. Simon & Schuster. 311+p. Soft wraps. The true story behind the major motion picture from Disney starring Chris Pine, Eric Bana, and Casey Affleck written by a recognized master of the genre a blockbuster account of tragedy at sea (The Providence Journal ). It s the winter of 1952 and a ferocious Nor'easter is pounding New England with howling winds and seventy-foot seas. Two oil tankers get caught in the violent storm off Cape Cod, its fury splitting the massive ships in two. Back on shore, four young Coast Guardsmen (BM1 Bernard Webber, Andrew Fitzgerald, Richard Livesey and Irving Maske) are issued a near impossible mission: save the lives of the stranded seamen. Sailing a tiny lifeboat into the teeth of the killer storm, the rescue crew soon loses all navigation. With no idea where the stranded seaman are nor how to get back home, the crew continues, soon coming upon the SS Pendleton in the darkness. Thirty three hopeful men appear at the wounded ship’s railings. Can the tiny lifeboat save them all? Dripping with suspense and high-stakes human drama, The Finest Hours has incredible and astonishing true-to-life heroism and action-packed rescue scenes. This marvelous and terrifying yarn ( Los Angeles Times ) deserves a place as a classic of survival at sea ( The Boston Globe). In the days following the ordeal, twenty-one Coast Guardsmen involved in multiple rescue missions would be decorated. Based upon the original 1985 account by Coxswain BM1 Bernard Webber. (M). $9.99. (x)

 

Just in time for the movie release The Finest Hours: 

1602. Webber, Bernie. Into a Raging Sea : My Life and the Pendleton Rescue. 2016. On Cape Publications. 172p. Soft wraps. Into A Raging Sea features the riveting, firsthand account of what is widely regarded as the greatest small-boat rescue in Coast Guard history, told by BM1 Bernie Webber. Webber and his crew were awarded the prestigious Gold Lifesaving medal for the miraculous rescue of thirty-two men off the stern of the SS Pendleton with a thirty-six-foot motor lifeboat, in nighttime blizzard conditions, with seas surpassing sixty feet. Made more famous in the recently released book and movie The Finest Hours, the rescue of 32 sailors from the sinking ship caught in a ferocious winter storm is a dramatic tale, but what made this mission so special is that the boat Webber skippered that terrible night was a mere 36 feet in length and the waves were almost twice that size! In Into A Raging Sea, Bernie tells that story, but the book is so much more than that. In these pages you'll read about rescue attempts that did not turn out well, stories of fishermen from a time long past, rescues done with the by-gone technique of the "breeches buoy," humorous anecdotes, and what Cape Cod and its people meant to Bernie. Into a Raging Sea is a story of sacrifice, bravery, disappointment, and challenges. And in the background of Bernie's journey is one constant, the sea. Forward by Michael J. Tougias. (M). $15.95. 

1613. Webber, Bernie. Lightships, Lighthouses, and Lifeboat Stations: A Memoir and History. 2015. Universal Publishers. 192p. Soft wraps. Lightships, Lighthouses and Lifeboat Stations is part history book, part memoir, written by Bernie Webber, recipient of the Coast Guard's highest award, the Gold Life-saving Medal, and one of the heros of the Disney movie The Finest Hours (released January 29, 2016). The manuscript for this book was written by Webber but not published before he passed away. Now his daughter with the help of writer Michael Tougias have published this his second book. While the public will recognize Webber's name from the movie and the bestselling book by the same name, few people know that during his lengthy Coast Guard career he served on lightships in addition to lifeboat stations (small boat rescue stations) and lighthouses. Webber poses the following question: "How did the lightship men cope with the isolation, constant loneliness, boredom, fear, or just sheer terror? All were part of life on board a lightship. Rough seas tossed the ship about, rearing up and down on the anchor chain. This was a world of isolation, noise from operating machinery, and blasts from the powerful foghorn that went on for hours, sometimes days, at a time." Webber answers that question in this book, drawing on a combination of personal experience and meticulous historical research. Discussions of men going mad, lightships being run down by larger ships, anchor chains breaking, and lightships cast upon shoals are offset by humorous stories and the author's reflections on his best days at sea. Webber also explains some of the heroic actions of a few lightship men over the years, and points out that they received no recognition at the time. The isolation these men faced was intense, but they learned to make do with what they had. Fourteen historic photos are included, as well as a Foreword by Michael Tougias. A most interesting and deserved further look into Bernie Webber’s life and career. (M). $25.95.

Note: I particularly enjoyed Webber’s accounts of life as a young Coast Guardsman, working with the Keepers from the old Lighthouse Service at Highland and Gay Head lights, and at Nauset and Gay Head Lifeboat Stations. 

20212. na. RESCUE CG36500. Orleans. 1985. Soft wraps. 48p. Illustrated with over 40 photographs. A collection of stories, photographs and illustrations detailing the career of CG36500 and the famous rescue of thirty-two men from a broken tanker on the night of February 8, 1952 off Chatham, Massachusetts. The information is gleaned from official Coast Guard reports, local news stories and the men who braved the seas that night themselves. Thirty years after the rescue, the boat was saved from oblivion and completely restored by volunteers of the Orleans Historical Society and still proudly plies Cape Cod waters as a museum dedicated to the memory of life-savers of the United States Coast Guard. (M). $19.95.

1647. Clarke, Liam. Light in the Darkness: A History of Lightships and the People Who Served on Them. Amberley Publishing. 2016. 224p. Soft wraps. Light in the Darkness examines the origins of the British lightship service, the obstacles and prejudices that faced originators of the idea and the subsequent development of the vessels and working practices over the years. Throughout the centuries, this dangerous occupation has claimed the lives of a number of lightship crews and those who tried to save them. The lives and working conditions of the brave men, who for over 260 years put their lives at risk guiding ships safely to their destinations, has been almost forgotten. Who were these brave men? Why did they do this vital work? Where did they live and what was the effect upon local communities when these tragedies occurred? Dr Liam Clarke answers these questions with a discussion of local lightship disasters including interviews with some of those who once served. The author, born into a family with a long history of lightship service, has a deep understanding of the dangerous working conditions and the pressures that this lifestyle had on the men and their families. He uses this to portray a lonely and hazardous life which few now remember, and which has rarely been written about. (M). $24.95.

 

15228. Richmond, Arthur P. Lighthouses and Lightships of Rhode Island. Schiffer. 2015. 144p. DJ. This pictorial guide provides a photographic tour of the last 400 years of Rhode Island lighthouse history. More than thirty lighthouse stations are described, from Watch Hill, near the Connecticut border in the south, to the inner harbor of Providence. The lighthouse station locations are identified using navigational charts and their characteristics, including date established, tower structure, optics, and fog signals. Also included are the dozen or so lighthouses that no longer exist. Probably not as well known, images and characteristics of these aids are similarly discussed. Over 300 images, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations, accompanied by present-day photographs that compare the development and evolution of these lighthouses. Many of the images found on these pages have been collected from historical resources and are being published for the first time. This book is a must-have for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Rhode Island history. (M). $34.99. Our Price $31.50

15218. Richmond, Arthur P. Massachusetts Lighthouses and Lightships. Schiffer. 2013. 256p. DJ. A must-have book for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Lighthouses and Lightships includes more than 850 images, many never before published. Also include historic plans that describe the details of these aids to navigation, and archival and contemporary photos that trace through their history. The book covers all the lighthouses and lightships that marked the shores (exclusive of Cape Cod and the Islands) and guided mariners through the challenging waters surrounding Massachusetts. This volume also explores the interiors of towers, shows the lantern rooms of rarely-visited lighthouses and gives fascinating facts about these beacons over their 200-year history. More than 876 images in color and b/w, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations. (M). $44.99. Our price $41.95.

13189. Richmond, Arthur P. Massachusetts Lighthouses: Past & Present. Schiffer. 2013. 160p. DJ. A must-have book for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Massachusetts history, Massachusetts Lighthouses Past and Present describes the more than sixty lighthouse stations that have been found along the coast from Fall River in the south to Salisbury in the north, near the New Hampshire border. The lighthouse station locations are identified using navigational charts and their characteristics, including date established, tower structure, optics, fog signals, and many more significant topics are presented in a straightforward table format. A dozen or so lighthouses that no longer exist, and probably are not as well known, are also discussed. More than four hundred images, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations and are accompanied by present-day photographs of these beacons. Numerous images show the insides of towers and lantern rooms not only in those open to the public for tours, but also in restricted or rarely visited lighthouses. (M). Published at $34.99. Our Price $31.50

10426. Richmond, Arthur P. Cape Cod Lighthouses and Lightships. Schiffer. 2010. 256p. Hard cover. DJ. This is an indispensable reference for the lighthouse enthusiast, required reading for those interested in maritime history, and a necessity for anyone who loves Cape Cod. Step back in time and observe the lighthouses and lightships that marked the shores and guided mariners through dangerous waters surrounding Cape Cod. Experience these maritime marvels and trace through the history of these lighthouses and lightships. Archived plans describe the details of these aids to navigation with more than 500 images, including some that have never before been published. Complete your journey with a visit to these historic spots, using the books comprehensive visitors’ guide. “Cape Cod Lighthouses and Lightships” is so thoroughly researched, so packed with individual narratives and visuals, that it is one of the most comprehensive books on Cape lighthouses to date. (M) $45. Our price $41.95.

 

  (Photo not included)

20363-pd. Flint , Willard. LIGHTSHIPS OF THE U. S. GOVERNMENT – Reference Notes. GPO. 1989. Reprint 2016. 540p. Blue stiff binding. The most complete work ever published on U. S. lightships and lightship stations. Lists virtually every detail available on each vessel, when and where built, cost, sister ships, design, length, propulsion, when and where it served, construction notes and modifications through the years, station assignments, masters and mates, illuminating apparatus, fog signals, final disposition and much more. Listed by vessel and by station assignment. The original is most difficult to find and sells in the $225 range when found. The ultimate reference on the subject. (M). $85.

 

15269. Smith, Bonnie Hurd and Nelson Dionne. U. S. Coast Guard Air Station Salem, Massachusetts: 1935-1970: A Pictorial and Chronological History. Createspace. 2015 118p  Soft wraps. On February 15, 1935, Coast Guard Air Station Salem opened on Winter Island to respond to emergency calls off the Atlantic Coast from as far south as Connecticut and as far north as Halifax. Two years later, the Salem Evening News reported that the air station in 1937 had established one of the most progressive records for flying and participating in mercy errands of any Coast Guard air station in the country. A few years later, during World War II, the men patrolled the coast in search of German U-boats. Until the Air Station closed in 1970 during a Coast Guard consolidation, Air Station Salem played a vital role in Salem and far beyond for thirty-five years. The men bravely saved dozens of lives at sea, and risked their own. Drawing upon the archive of Salem collector Nelson Dionne, this book presents a brief chronological history of Coast Guard Air Station Salem and photographs of its story. Although the station is no longer active, it will always be remembered. So must the men of Coast Guard Air Station Salem who lost their lives in the line of duty. Today the few remaining buildings and the area at Air Station Salem are being improved and restored. (M). $26.

15218. Richmond, Arthur P. Massachusetts Lighthouses and Lightships. Schiffer. 2015. 256p. DJ. A must-have book for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Massachusetts history. Massachusetts Lighthouses and Lightships includes more than 850 images, many never before published. Also include historic plans that describe the details of these aids to navigation, and archival and contemporary photos that trace through their history. The book covers all the lighthouses and lightships that marked the shores (exclusive of Cape Cod and the Islands) and guided mariners through the challenging waters surrounding Massachusetts. This volume also explores the interiors of towers, shows the lantern rooms of rarely-visited lighthouses and gives fascinating facts about these beacons over their 200-year history. More than 876 images in color and b/w, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations. (M). $44.99. (x)

15228. Richmond, Arthur P. Lighthouses and Lightships of Rhode Island. Schiffer. 2015. 144p. DJ. This pictorial guide provides a photographic tour of the last 400 years of Rhode Island lighthouse history. More than thirty lighthouse stations are described, from Watch Hill, near the Connecticut border in the south, to the inner harbor of Providence. The lighthouse station locations are identified using navigational charts and their characteristics, including date established, tower structure, optics, and fog signals. Also included are the dozen or so lighthouses that no longer exist. Probably not as well known, images and characteristics of these aids are similarly discussed. Over 300 images, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations, accompanied by present-day photographs that compare the development and evolution of these lighthouses. Many of the images found on these pages have been collected from historical resources and are being published for the first time. This book is a must-have for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Rhode Island history. (M). $34.99. (x)

1589. Jesson, Jim. Recollections of a World War II Coast Guardsman. 2013. 33p. Soft wraps. A series of short stories recollected by Jim Jesson who served in the US Coast Guard in World War II. These are actual events in Coast Guard history with the dates, places, and statistics recalled to the best of Jim's memory. War II raged across the world, few Americans were aware just how close to our shores the mighty German Navy operated. Later a Boston Detective, Jim Jesson take you back to that time, sharing his insights and experiences in a way that only a WW II veteran can. As German U-boats approached the Atlantic shore of the U.S., they set their sights on civilian and naval vessels alike. As a young man like so many others, Jim Jesson set out to do his part for America. From his first confrontation with a German U-boat as a teenage civilian working on a Boston-based tugboat to a later military service encounter with Germans on Nantucket Island, Jesson carries the reader back to a fearful time in history. Readers will be amazed at the little known heroics of a team of specially trained Police Officers who came face to face with a squad of German SS troops protecting a German communications outpost. Jesson further brings to words the experience of a mere teenager aboard a Mystery Q-ship out in the fierce North Atlantic. The Q-ship was heavily armed with concealed weaponry, acting as a decoy to the merciless enemy. These and other short stories in the book add new insights to the War in New England. (M). $24.

 

15253. Towers, Guy. St. George Reef Lighthouse. Arcadia 2015. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 200 vintage photographs. Situated at the end of a reef six miles offshore of Crescent City, California, stands St. George Reef Lighthouse. Constructed after the wreck of the coastal steamer Brother Jonathan in 1865, the beacon warned mariners of the dreaded “Dragon Rocks” of St. George Reef for nearly a century. This book chronicles the loss of the Jonathan, decades of efforts to make the light a reality, the 10-year construction period, manning of the station by keepers of the US Lighthouse Service and Coast Guard, and the struggles and accomplishments of dedicated volunteers to restore what many lighthouse historians refer to as “America’s greatest lighthouse.” This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1870’s to the present, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of this light station through photos and text. Filled with early views. (M). $21.99.

 

15223. Barbo, Theresa Mitchell. Hidden History of Cape Cod. The History Press. 2015. 144p. Soft wraps. The proverbial salty waves and sandy beaches of Cape Cod disguise its fascinating and nearly forgotten history. There’s history that is hidden beneath our feet, over our heads and sometimes right before our eyes. Learn why one of the most famous rescues in Coast Guard history spent nearly fifty years in the shadows without public notice. Discover which wild creature went from the 19th century soup pot to enjoying conservation protection under state law. Historian Theresa Mitchell Barbo explores these mysteries and more, from the lost diary of a nineteenth century schoolteacher to the reason Cape Codders call their lunch “the noontime dinner.” Join Barbo as she lifts the lid on the quirky and remarkable character of Cape Cod and its forgotten and neglected happenings of yesteryear. Illustrated with 39 Black And White photos. Interesting reading. (M). $21.99. 

 

Available once again:

 

  20209. Webber, Bernard C., CHATHAM “The Lifeboatmen”. Orleans , Mass. 1985. 1st. 128p. Illustrated with numerous photographs. Late in February 1952, a northeaster swept New England with bitter cold, snow and gale force winds. East of Chatham 70-knot winds and 60-foot seas battered merchant vessels as the tankers SS Fort Mercer and SS Pendleton met the full force of the storm. They both broke in two on the morning of February 19th with 84 half-frozen men marooned on the battered hulks. The story of how these men were rescued is retold even today. In the days following the ordeal, twenty-one Coast Guardsmen would be decorated. The men who ventured into 60-foot seas in the little 36-foot CG36500 motor lifeboat to rescue the tanker crews showed what heroism really is. How this all came about, and the story of life at Cape Cod small boat stations in the 1950’s, is a tale well worth reading and a tribute to Coast Guardsmen everywhere.  Wonderful reading. (M).  $44.95.

Special numbered edition with actual wood piece from MLB CG-36500.  $59.95. 

 

15208. Lawrence, Matthew, John Galluzzo and Deborah Marx. Shipwrecks of Stellwagen Bank: Disaster in New England's National Marine Sanctuary. 2015. History Press. 144p. Soft wraps. Beneath the churning surface of Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary rest the bones of shipwrecks and sailors alike. Massachusetts’ ports connected its citizens to the world, and the number of merchant and fishing vessels grew alongside the nation’s development. Hundreds of ships sank on the trade routes and fishing grounds between Cape Cod and Cape Ann. Their stories are waiting to be uncovered—from the ill-fated steamship Portland to collided schooners Frank A. Palmer and Louise B. Crary and the burned dragger Joffre. Join historian John Galluzzo and maritime archaeologists Matthew Lawrence and Deborah Marx as they dive in to investigate the sunken vessels and captivating history of New England’s only national marine sanctuary. Illustrated with over 50 b/w photos. (M). $21.99. (x)

 

2nd Edition Just Out:

23290e. Demeter, Andrew and David. CHELSEA CLOCK COMPANY: The First Hundred Years. 2nd edition. 2014. For over a hundred years the Chelsea Clock Company has manufactured a distinguished line of high quality clocks. Regarded as one of America ’s highest quality products, Chelsea Clocks have been presented to heads of state throughout the world. Photographs taken in the White House throughout this century show Chelsea Clocks in settings of distinction. Collectors have long prized them for their quality, beauty, unique design and historic significance. Now in this updated and lengthened second edition, the history of the Chelsea Clock Company has been written and it reads like a contemporary enterprise including mysteries, disasters, near failure and a fascinating collection of characters. Historical photographs, vintage advertisements, as well as illustrations and photographs from old catalogues are included. This updated and expanded second edition also includes: Ten more vintage models added to the Identification Guide to help collectors in identifying seldom seen designs, with color photographs from the finest collections in America, an Alphabetical Index on every movement model developed by the company by date and designated purpose, individual indices that list every clock made for the U.S. Lighthouse Establishment & Service, U.S. Life-Saving Service, and U.S. Revenue Cutter Service by serial number, type, and date of issuance, a new Boston Clock Co. Index of this subsidiary’s manufacture of clocks from 1909 to 1931. With eighty-five more pages of material to assist the collector in identifying factory issued models and their origins, this work will surely be a “must have” for collectors and professionals alike. Andrew and David Demeter have created a remarkable volume complete with lists of serial numbers to aid you in authenticating your piece, and photographs of Chelsea Clock Company’s current staff. In Chelsea Clock Company: The First Hundred Years, the Demeters have once again provided a valuable and sought after resource for collectors and those who appreciate American craftsmanship at its finest. Only 1000 of this second edition have been printed and they will be in great demand! (M). $145. (no discounts apply)

15181. Coyle, Gretchen F. and Deborah C. Whitcraft. Tucker's Island. Arcadia 2015. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 160 vintage photographs. Once located between Great Bay and Little Egg Harbor, along the New Jersey coast, in 1932 Tucker’s Island disappeared into the Atlantic Ocean. Sand dunes and native foliage once covered its eight miles. For generations, the Rider family kept the lighthouse illuminated, and the US Life-Saving Service provided aid to ships in distress. Two hotels were constructed by island men with building materials salvaged from local shipwrecks. Visitors arrived by sail or steam, and the popularity of Tucker’s Island inspired real estate agents to sell worthless lots to unsuspecting buyers eager for their own piece of the shore. Over the years storms battered the vulnerable island and by 1927 the lighthouse toppled onto the sand. Soon the life-saving station washed away, and in 1932, the island was removed from tax records. This compact volume features numerous early photographs dating from the 1870’s through the 1920’s, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of these services and the island through photos and text. Filled with early Life-Saving and Coast Guard views. (M). $21.99.

1578. Ewen, William H. Jr. and Tom Dunlop. Steamboats to Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. Arcadia. 2015. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 226 vintage photographs. The islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, off the Cape Cod coast of Massachusetts, were first inhabited by members of the Wampanoag tribe. English settlements were established in the mid-1600s. As the populations and commerce grew, so did the need for reliable transportation. The islands were first served by privately owned sailing vessels, but things began to change with the introduction of marine steam power. In 1818, the little steamer Eagle was the first to cross Nantucket Sound. Although she only remained in these waters for three months, she began what was to become a tradition of steamboat travel to the islands that lasted for 170 years. The images in this volume include well-known steamers with familiar names like Nobska, Naushon, Gay Head, and Uncatena, as well as many others. This compact volume features 226 early photographs dating from the 1800’s through today, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of these services through photos and text. (M). $21.99. (x)

2096. Light-House Board, INSTRUCTIONS TO LIGHT-KEEPERS AND MASTERS OF LIGHT-HOUSE VESSELS. GPO. 1902. 104 pp includes 39 plates. Nicely photo-reproduced by the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Assoc., Michigan, 1989. Available in hardcover with DJ. This is a MUST for anyone interested in the subject. Contains a wealth of information, particularly in the plates for use in identifying lamps. Includes complete Instructions for Light-Keepers in Stations with Two or More Keepers, Light Stations With One Keeper, Keepers of Light-Vessels, Management of Lens Lights and Disposition of Lamps and Illuminating Apparatus, Management of Mechanical Lamps, Revolving Machinery, trimming of wicks, morning duties, and much more. Includes all aspects of station and apparatus maintenance. A very complete and important document. Excellent value for the price. New. Hardcover. $24.95.  Softcover $19.95

  

10427. Coffin, Edward Wayman. TUCKERNUCK ISLAND – A Pictorial Review of the Island. [self published] 2008. 200p. Soft wraps. Lying west of Nantucket , just eight miles from Martha’s Vineyard , Tuckernuck is a low bleak island, ringed with sandy shoals and often entrapped by foul weather. The island has an area of about 900 acres (1.4 square miles). Often ice bound in winter with high tides, Tuckernuck, like its neighbor Muskeget, was the scene of many shipwrecks through the years. Its population consisted occasional fishermen with only seasonal increases by the local Island Club gunners taking advantage of the prolific fowl population. This unusual book is written from the point of view of an islander (the author’s father served on the neighboring island as a Life Saving Service surfman). The book relates many interesting tales formerly untold with interesting comments on the life and recreation of the seasonal population. Also included are hundreds of rare photographs from private collections. Privately published in a very limited quantity (only 500 printed), quite difficult to find now. (M). $42.

 

1530. D’Entremont, Jeremy. Lovers' Light: The History of Minot's Ledge Lighthouse. 2015.  Coastlore Media. 121p. Soft wraps. Minot's Ledge Lighthouse, off Boston's South Shore near the towns of Cohasset and Scituate, has a fascinating history replete with heroism, tragedy, and triumph. Widely known as the "I Love You Light" after its famous 1-4-3 flash characteristic, it has sparked the imaginations of lighthouse lovers around the world. The present (1860) tower is one of the classic examples of a granite wave-swept lighthouse and has withstood the battering of countless storms. It stands today as a testament to its designers and builders and as a monument to the brave keepers who stood watch for nearly a century. This new book brings together a variety of source documents, including correspondence, government documents, log entries, interviews with keepers, and much more to help paint an historic portrait of one of the world's most dramatic lighthouses. Well illustrated with photos, engravings and illustrations. (M). $12.95.

1531. D’Entremont, Jeremy. History of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse. 2013. Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouses. 66p. Soft wraps. The large, well-protected harbor of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the Piscataqua River, was an important port in colonial America. It still remains New Hampshire's only deep water port. It was here that a lighthouse, the first one in the American colonies north of Boston, was established in 1771. In nearly two and one-half centuries since that time, the light station has been home to a succession of fascinating personalities and the scene of much human drama. This book brings together a variety of source documents, log entries, interviews with keepers, and much more to help paint an historic portrait of this interesting light station. Well illustrated with photos, engravings and illustrations. (M). $8.95.

 

14325. Mason, Paul J. Great Lakes Lighthouse Tenders: A History of the Boats and Crews That Served in the U.S. Lighthouse Service on the Great Lakes. M&B Global Solutions. 2014. 66p. The ships and crews of the U.S. Lighthouse Tender Service were the unsung heroes of Great Lakes transportation for more than a century. Yet despite the critical role they played in maritime operations, little information is available about these hard-working men and the ships they called home.Author Paul J. Mason provides an illustrated history of lighthouse tenders that served on "The Lakes," complete with rare photos and fascinating back stories. Great Lakes history buffs will enjoy learning about these forgotten ships and crews, and their place in maritime's golden age. Author Mason’s interest in the U.S. Lighthouse Service and its Great Lakes tenders stems from his grandfather, Richard H. Burdeno, was chief engineer on the USLHT Clover. Paul joined the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and currently serves as a volunteer crew member on a Coast Guard 25-foot patrol boat at U.S. Coast Guard (AUXOP) Station Green Bay (Wisconsin). (M). $19.

1486. Lonergan, Tom. Martha Coston and The Box of Light. iUniverse. 2013. 196p. Soft wraps. Widowed at the age of twenty-one, left penniless with four children to raise, Martha Coston overcame nineteenth century bias to carry on her deceased husband's work, patenting and manufacturing history's first night time signal device. Traveling the world, she then successfully marketed the Coston Night Signal to the navies, coast guardians and railroads of every industrialized nation, founding a company that flourished for more than a century. In her lifetime, Martha Coston became close friends with Admiral David Farragut, was introduced to British society in Queen Victoria's own drawing room, banqueted with Napoleon III at the Palaise de Tuilleries, danced with the King of Sweden at his summer retreat at Rosendal, was feted by the Admiral of the Russian fleet at Kronstadt Island in St. Petersburg, struggled across winter ice floes in Scandinavia and fought fang and claw with the United States Congress for her invention to be recognized. Detailed, interesting account written in the first person. (M). 21.95.

 

2315. Renton , Alan. LOST SOUNDS. Scotland . 2001. 2nd printing 2014. 209 p. Soft wraps. This sought after title is finally available again - an intriguing history and one not to be missed. The book visits a number of lighthouses at different times over the last 130 years to reveal the philanthropic, scientific and romantic story of the fog signal - how they came about, how the machinery worked and, for the mariner and the keeper, what it sounded like! The development of fog signals complemented the expansion of lighthouse construction worldwide from the last quarter of the 19th century and represented the attempt to provide a navigation aid to mariners when the beam of light from the lighthouse lens was obscured by fog. This aim, despite the best efforts of the available technology, was frustrated by the medium of air with its effect on sound propagation, but the attempt to overcome the difficulties encouraged many eminent Victorian scientists and engineers to help shape the story of fog signals. This story of fog signals is drawn from visits and site surveys at specific lighthouses with wide research of original documents held by the lighthouse authorities, private companies, museums and archives. Lost Sounds reveals the practical developments of sound signals from the early percussion instruments to the later succession of compressed air sirens and diaphones through to the last remaining electric emitters. (M). $33.50.

 

14230. Williams, Gary. Guardian of Guadalcanal: The World War II Story of Douglas A. Munro, United States Coast Guard. Lakota Press, 2014 . 280p. DJ. Guardian of Guadalcanal is the World War II biographical account of Petty Officer Douglas A. Munro, United States Coast Guard, the Coast Guard’s only Medal of Honor recipient. “Douglas A. Munro, a signalman first class of the United States Coast Guard, died heroically on Guadalcanal September 27, 1942, after succeeding in his assignment, for which he had volunteered, to evacuate a detachment of Marines from a point where enemy opposition developed beyond anticipated dimensions. Munro's final words were "Did they get off?" As World War II approached, Munro left to enlist in the United States Coast Guard in 1939. He had an outstanding record as an enlisted man and was promoted rapidly through the various ratings to a signalman, first class. In the action [where he was killed in action], Munro had already played an important part, since he was in charge of the original detachment of ten boats that had landed the Marines at the scene. He had successfully got them ashore and then had headed his boats back to a previously assigned position. Almost immediately upon his return, he was advised by the officer in charge that conditions had been different than had been anticipated and that it was necessary to evacuate the men immediately. Munro volunteered for the job of heading the boats for the evacuation. In charge of the rescue expedition, he brought the boats in-shore under heavy enemy fire and proceeded to evacuate the men on the beach. When most of them were in the boats, complications arose in evacuating the last men, whom Munro realized would be in the greatest danger. He accordingly so placed himself and his boats that they would serve as cover for the last men to leave. It was thus that he was fatally wounded -- protecting the men after he had evacuated them. He remained conscious sufficiently long only to say four words: "Did they get off?" He died, therefore, with the realization that his mission had succeeded and his final assignment had been carried out.” In addition to the Medal of Honor, Munro was also awarded, posthumously, the Purple Heart Medal, and was eligible for the American Defense Service Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Area Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal. To this date, Munro is the only Coast Guardsman to have been awarded the Medal of Honor. Written by the acclaimed author of SEAL of Honor, Gary Williams, the full story of Douglas Munro’s life and service has finally been told in it's entirety. Petty Officer Douglas A. Munro truly led by example “…he was courageous, selfless and was only thinking about the mission at hand”. This book is a tribute to Petty Officer Munro and is a worthwhile read. A significant individual in Coast Guard history who should not be forgotten. (M). $29.99. (x)

14255. Marshall, Charles. Surfmen. Fireship Press. 2013. 294p. Soft wraps. As lightning cracks over a roiling sea, a young boy clings to life amidst the waves. His family... his friends... all that he's ever known... have been taken by the storm. Drifting in the sea-tossed wreckage, the boy is unexpectedly rescued and given a new chance at life on the sands of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Thirty years later, thirteen years after the Civil War, on that same far-flung spit of sand at Cape Hatteras, seven men of courage face the sea and its storms as men of the United States Lifesaving Service. Recruited and trained by that same boy grown to manhood, Confederate blockade runner Captain Thomas Hooper, the men of Cape Hatteras Station are the only hope for sailors in distress at the treacherous Diamond Shoals. As Thomas Hooper readies his men to fight the sea and tries to keep them from fighting each other, he realizes that the souls he's there to save may very well be those of his men and himself. A good read. (M). $29.95. (x)

 

The movie is on the way - read now of the greatest small boat rescue in Coast Guard History:

  

29185. Tougias, Michael J and Casey Sherman. The Finest Hours - The True Story of the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue. Simon and Schuster. 2009. 224p. DJ. In the winter of 1952, New England was battered by the most brutal nor'easter in years. As the weather wreaked havoc on land, the freezing Atlantic became a wind-whipped zone of peril. In the early hours of Monday, February 18, while the storm raged, two oil tankers, the Pendleton and the Fort Mercer , found themselves in the same horrifying predicament. Built with "dirty steel," and not prepared to withstand such ferocious seas, both tankers split in two, leaving the dozens of men on board utterly at the Atlantic 's mercy. The Finest Hours is the gripping, true story of the valiant attempt to rescue the souls huddling inside the broken halves of the two ships. Coast Guard cutters raced to the aid of those on the Fort Mercer , and when it became apparent that the halves of the Pendleton were in danger of capsizing, the Guard sent out two thirty-six-foot lifeboats as well. These wooden boats, manned by only four seamen each, were dwarfed by the enormous seventy-foot seas. As the tiny rescue vessels set out from the coast of Cape Cod , the men aboard were all fully aware that they were embarking on what could easily become a suicide mission. The spellbinding tale is overflowing with breathtaking scenes that sear themselves into the mind's eye, as boats capsize, bows and sterns crash into one another, and men hurl themselves into the raging sea in their terrifying battle for survival. Not all of the eighty-four men caught at sea in the midst of that brutal storm survived, but considering the odds, it's a miracle -- and a testament to their bravery -- that any came home to tell their tales at all. (M). Hard cover with dj. $24.95. Soft cover $14.95. Autographed copy $29.95. (subject to availability)

For more information see our SS Pendleton - SS Fort Mercer page.

A Sleeper!  Well Done! We recently purchased the author’s remaining stock and can pass on the savings to you:

20230. Farson, Robert H., TWELVE MEN DOWN – Massachusetts Sea Rescues. Yarmouth Port.2000. 246p. 191 photos and illustrations. In Colonial Days Massachusetts turned to the sea for her livelihood. With the growth of coastal and deepwater fleets, many trips ended in disaster. The loss of life was so great that in the late 1700’s the Massachusetts Humane Society was formed. Their work up to World War II, and the work of its successor the U. S. Life-Saving Service, are detailed in this wonderful new work. From Martha’s Vineyard and Cuttyhunk, to Nantucket, Cape Cod and up the coast to  Salisbury Beach, there were small stations with surfboats and breeches buoy apparatus. This is a book about rescues near the coast by men who rowed small boats into mountainous waves, many in bitterly cold weather. Thousands of sailors were saved by these intrepid men and their story of selfless dedication comes alive in Mr. Farson’s work. Nicely illustrated with numerous vintage photographs. (M). (Published at $36.)  Special Purchase Price. $19.95. 

 

14121. Ives, John G. The Keeper. Bohme Publishing. 2013. 416p. Soft wraps. The Keeper is a fresh, new historical fiction at its very best. Filled with electrifying rescue scenes, pitting a handful of men against fierce storms and bitter cold. A story of honor and love, fellowship and betrayal, strength and vulnerability. This is a novel of the Life-Savers, set in Provincetown, on the tip of Cape Cod, in 1899. Joshua Duell, the book's hero, is a young New Yorker who returns home from the Spanish American War. Now his mother has disappeared in a mysterious shipwreck, and he travels to the small village of Provincetown at the outer reach of the continent to find out how. With his friend and college roommate Buddy, Joshua joins the United States Life-Saving Service patrolling the outer beaches. Under the leadership of their Keeper John MacDonald, they face rigorous training and treacherous work as the storms come. Buddy is a charmer, but he alienates the other Life-Savers, which leads him to take drastic actions he and Joshua will come to deeply regret. A story of intense action, beautiful descriptions of the sea, and the coming of age of a fascinating young man. (M). $18.95. (x)

14228. Eisner, Harvey (ed). WTC: In Their Own Words. 2011. Cygnus. 278p. Soft wraps. With DVD of interviews and testimonials from survivors and firefighters. Filled with comprehensive, exclusive interviews with firefighters who responded to the World Trade Center attack, WTC: In Their Own Words, is a special collector's edition book from Firehouse Magazine in commemoration of the 10 year anniversary of the attack and as a testimonial to the first responders. Eisner, a retired Tenafly, New Jersey fire chief and longtime editor of Firehouse Magazine, felt the calling to capture the story of 9/11 and present it through the eyes of those who responded to the call – members of the FDNY – the New York Fire Department. It’s more than photojournalism at its best – captured images from a perspective never before seen by the public. It’s a reference guide. And in years to come, it may very well be a seminal historic accounting of the immediate aftermath of the worst terrorist attack in history. For some, still active or retired firefighters, it was too difficult to tell the story. For others, it was just the first, or second time, that they’ve ever articulated the emotional pain of that fateful day, nearly 10 years ago. This softbound book takes a highly detailed, in-depth look at the day's events and fire department response. This book also includes an exclusive DVD which includes interviews and testimonials from survivors and firefighters. Eisner felt it important to record for history the words of some of those who put their lives on the line. To present stories that have never before been publicly shared. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this volume will benefit these four organizations: FDNY Foundation, National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, UFA Thomas R. Elsasser Fund, Wounded Warrior Project. A fitting tribute to responders who we should never forget. (M). $49. 

 

 

1443. Claflin, James W. Lighthouses and Life-Saving Along Cape Cod. Arcadia. 2014. 128p. Soft wraps. With over 200 vintage photographs, this is the fourth volume in a series of photographic histories of lighthouses and lifesaving along the coasts of the United States by the author. For centuries, heroic men and women have guarded the treacherous yet beloved Cape Cod coastlines. From Provincetown to Chatham, Sandwich to Cuttyhunk, and many towns in between, residents have relied on the Atlantic for employment and nourishment. But Cape Cod has always been plagued with a shifting coastline that consistently defies mariners’ efforts to pass through Massachusetts waters. In 1792, as shipping increased, mariners petitioned for a sorely needed lighthouse. It was not until 1797 that the first lighthouse on Cape Cod was built at the Highlands in North Truro. More lights and rescue stations would follow as the seas claimed their toll. Many lightship stations were also established from Chatham through Nantucket Sound to mark the constantly changing sandbars submerged offshore—more than in any other spot along the US coastline. Today, as sea levels change and sands continue to shift, some of these historic stations have been lost or moved, while still others are preserved only in such photographs as these. This compact volume features over 200 early photographs dating from the 1870’s through the 1960’s, drawn from the author’s and other private collections, most never before published, and traces the history of these services through photos and text. (M). $21.99. 

14222. Woodman, Richard and Andrew Adams. 'Light Upon the Waters' - The History of Trinity House. The Corporation of Trinity House. London. 2013. 320p. DJ. Hardback, large format and lavishly illustrated with 450 colour photos and illustrations, plans and charts. As part of their quincentenary celebrations, Trinity House has produced the definitive history book of the Corporation, 'Light Upon The Waters'. Trinity House is a private corporation governed under a Royal Charter. It has three core functions: it is the official General Lighthouse Authority for England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar, responsible for the provision and maintenance of navigational aids, such as lighthouses, lightvessels, buoys, and maritime radio/satellite communication systems. Trinity House is also an official deep sea pilotage authority, providing expert navigators for ships trading in Northern European waters. The story of the corporation from incorporation to the current day, a span of 500 years, has been thoroughly researched and written up and illustrated with many beautiful and striking images from the corporation's extensive archives and collections. The book contains a wealth of information and is particularly good on nineteenth century lighthouse construction. This book will serve as the official definitive history, from the days of Henry VIII to the technological developments and changes faced in the new millennia. At the end of five centuries, the corporation remains; striving to serve the mariner with undiminished energy and inventiveness. This hardback, large format book delivers a fine illustrated history of Trinity House and calls upon the strengths of two experts in their respective fields: Captain Richard Woodman and Captain Andrew Adams. Captain Adams was a boy seaman when he joined Trinity House in 1963. During his over 40 year career he gained a wide experience afloat, becoming Chief Pilot in the Port of Harwich, and an RNR Captain and Nautical Adviser. His contribution to this book derives from his interest in a knowledge of the history of pilotage. He is a Younger Brother of Trinity House. Captain Woodman went to sea aged 16 and served in cargo-liners and Ocean Weather Ships before spending more than 30 years with Trinity House, several in command afloat and ashore. He was elected an Elder Brother in 2006. He is a keen yachtsman and an award-winning author with over 50 published works to his credit. A splendid book that deserves to be alongside anyone’s maritime collection and a must for anyone even remotely interested in lighthouse history, British maritime history and the lighthouses of the British Isles. Difficult to find. Weight 5 lbs. (M). $145. (x)

 

14118. Waterway, William. Gay Head Lighthouse – The First Light on Martha’s Vineyard. 2014. History Press. 176p. Soft wraps. On the afternoon of October 21, 2013, Gay Head Lighthouse researcher William Waterway discovered the 1844 stone foundation for Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts’s original 1799 wooden Gay Head Lighthouse when it was moved back 75 feet from the eroding cliffs. Today, still standing tall on the colorful clay cliffs of Martha’s Vineyard, Gay Head Lighthouse continues to provide safe passage to seafarers as it has since 1799. The steadfast tower marks a dangerous and heavily traveled passage between the island and mainland known as Devil’s Bridge. Being the first lighthouse on the Vineyard, Gay Head Light has a rich and varied history filled with stories of inspirational lighthouse keepers, disastrous shipwrecks and even mysterious deaths. Today, Gay Head Light serves as an iconic symbol of the island’s maritime history and attracts visitors from around the world. Join author William Waterway as he charts the history of the lighthouse from the original wooden tower lit with oil lamps to the rebuilt brick structure that houses the famous Fresnel lens. Filled with information on the light’s keepers and their families, changes over the years, the nearby Life-Saving station and crews, and more, this is a long awaited addition to our lighthouse libraries. (M). $19.99. 

14119. Klim, Jake. Attack on Orleans: The World War I Submarine Raid on Cape Cod. 2014. History Press. 176p. Soft wraps. On the warm morning of July 21, 1918 – during the last year of the First World War - a new prototype of German submarine surfaced three miles off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts and attacked an unarmed towboat and her four barges. A handful of the shells fired by the U-boat’s two deck guns struck Nauset Beach, giving the modest town of Orleans the distinction of being the first, and only, spot in the United States to receive fire from the enemy during the entire World War. Coming to Cape Cod’s defense that momentous day were a hodgepodge of average American citizens – doctors, fishermen, vacationing cottagers, young children - as well as two groups of first responders that could not be more opposite; the waning United States Live-Saving Services, now the fledgling U.S. Coast Guard, and the infant air arm of the United States Navy. Lifesavers from the Orleans station launched a surfboat under heavy enemy shellfire and rowed in the direction of the thirty-two sailors trapped aboard the tug and barges. It was a situation Cape Cod’s surfmen never imagined being in; they were far more accustomed to rescuing sailors from wooden schooners caught in Nor’easters than from the jaws of an enemy submarine. Meanwhile, in the sky above, rickety seaplanes from the local Naval Air Station dive-bombed the enemy raider with payloads of TNT. It was the first time in history that American aviators engaged an enemy vessel in the western Atlantic. Although upwards of one thousand citizens watched the spectacle from shore, the “Attack on Orleans” is a story very few Americans, outside the proud town of Orleans, have ever heard. A most interesting account, well illustrated with photos. (M). $19.99.

Cape Cod Towns - Images of America Series. $21.99 each

Longley, Jennifer. Hyannis And Hyannis Port

Lombardo, Daniel. Orleans

Lombardo, Daniel. Wellfleet, A Cape Cod Village

Schofield, Marilyn C and Roberta Cornish. Eastham

Vuilleumier, Marion R. Sandwich, Cape Cod's Oldest Town

Cuttyhunk Historical Society. Cuttyhunk And The Elizabeth Islands

Brennan, Susan W and Diana Worthington. Truro

Edward O…. Barnstable Village, West Barnstable and Sandy Neck

Sicchio, Mary. The Forgotten Cape 1940-1960

Pizzolato, Susan and Lynda Ames Byrne. Wareham

Brewster Historical Society. Brewster

Claflin, James W. Lighthouses and Life Saving Along Cape Cod

13438. Simpson, Bland. Ghost Ship of Diamond Shoals: The Mystery of the Carroll A. Deering. Univ. of North Carolina Press. 2005. In the misty dawn of January 31, 1921, a Coast Guardsman on watch at the Cape Hatteras Life-Saving Station sighted a mighty five-masted schooner, all sails set, wrecked on the treacherous Diamond Shoals. Rescuers rushed to the ship, but when they arrived they found the Carroll A. Deering deserted, with no trace of the captain, Willis B. Wormell, or the crew. When, several months later, a bottle was found on a nearby beach, purportedly containing a note from a crew member who ascribed the schooner's fate to its capture by pirates, a sensational panic in international shipping ensued. The captain's daughter successfully lobbied for a federal investigation, but months of inquiry failed to turn up either the missing crew or a reason for the ship's demise. To this day, the fate of the Deering has remained one of the greatest mysteries of maritime history. Bland Simpson assembles the known facts into a compelling reconstruction of the Carol A. Deering's final voyage and its baffling aftermath. Using contemporary sources including newspapers, FBI reports, ship's logs, and personal and official correspondence, he weaves together historical narrative with the voices of key participants in the drama. Simpson's haunting chronicle keeps the story of the Deering alive, an apt memorial to the ghost ship and its lost crew. (M). $19.95.

13453. Hall, Wesley. The Hooligan Navy: A True Story About the Old Coast Guard. iUniverse.com, Inc. 2001. Soft wraps. The Hooligan Navy is the third book of a trilogy based upon the author's Navy (WWII) and Coast Guard (post-WWII) experiences. It is the frank and quite often humorous confession of what life was like as a radio operator in the late 1940s aboard a variety of U. S. Coast Guard cutters. Wesley Hall, at the age of 22, joined the Coast Guard in Oklahoma City, near his home, and was sent to Government Island, Alameda, California. From there he went to the CGC Alert, based in Humboldt Bay, Eureka, California. His record was a clean slate, and his future as a radio operator seemed bright. Fate, however, intervened and, incredibly, during the next two years, when his hitch was up, he served aboard five other cutters, including two Indian cutters assigned to Ocean Station Fox (the Chautauqua and the Escanaba); the Taney, another and larger cutter assigned to gather weather information at Station Fox; the Bramble, a buoy tender, assigned to the northern California coast; and the Storis, an icebreaker that took him from Baltimore, Maryland, to Juneau, Alaska. It is the true story of a young man whose first black mark inexorably led to a second and a third, despite his good intentions. This is a humorous book about this young ex-Navy sailor who found out the hard way that the Coast Guard is a very small outfit where the officers all knew each other and shared what they knew about recalcitrant swabs. A must read if you are interested in early times in the military. (M). $46.

 

14149. Smithweck, David. Mobile Point Lighthouse, Fort Morgan, Alabama. Mobile. 2014. 70p. Soft wraps. Mobile Point is located on the southeastern shore at the entrance into Mobile Bay from the Gulf of Mexico. The hazards created by constantly shifting shoals as the tide waters flow into the bay made aids to navigation a necessity for mariners. This is the story of one of those aids--The 1872 Mobile Point Lighthouse. Filled with information, profusely illustrated with photos, documents, plans and more. (M). $19.95. (x)

 

14178. Oleszewski, Wes. The Best of Wes Oleszewski - Favorite Great Lakes Shipwreck Stories. Avery. 2014. 202p. Soft wraps. The author has researched and written hundreds of Great Lakes Maritime stories over the years. He has personally chosen his "best" and is putting his favorites in the book True, factual stories of some of the most devastating Great Lakes shipwrecks ever documented. This book will take you through the 1800’s and the 1900’s, while in the shoes of the sailors, some lost, others forgotten, still others remembered as heroes. Huge waves, frigid weather and terrifying situations - relieve it all in this exciting book. A great read of classic Wes stories. (M). $16.95. (x)

 

14117. Dunn, Bill. Sea Girt Lighthouse – The Community Beacon. Charleston. 2014. 192p. Soft wraps. Illustrated with over 100 photos. The Jersey Shore lighthouse that stands in Sea Girt has been a guiding beacon for seafarers since the end of the nineteenth century. A revolutionary lens, designed by Frenchman Augustin-Jean Fresnel, captured the flickering flame of a burning wick and projected a unique flash that could be seen for fifteen miles. The genius of Fresnel’s design, on full display at the lighthouse, impresses as much now as it did in the days of sail. Many colorful characters were put in command here, including a Civil War soldier, a pioneering woman, an inventor and, for one day, the twenty-year-old daughter of a keeper. Sea Girt Lighthouse played an important role in defending the coast during World War II, when U.S. Coast Guard troops stood watch in the tower and patrolled the beaches. After its decommissioning, the lighthouse served for over two decades as the town library and recreation center, but by 1981, it was at risk of being closed and sold. That’s when a group of community members—the Sea Girt Lighthouse Citizens Committee—successfully fought to save and preserve the shore landmark. Today, the lighthouse is the community beacon, alive with activity and attracting visitors who flock from around the country and the world to experience its history. Well illustrated, with great accounts of the keepers and their lives here. (M). $21.99. (x)

14157. Kotzian, John. Sky Pilot of the Great Lakes. Avery. 2008. 224p. Soft wraps. "Sky Pilot" was sailors' slang for a chaplain. This book tells the life story of the Reverend William H. Law, a story that has never been told before. The Reverend Law was in peril on the Great Lakes and was rescued by a U.S. Life-Saving Service Station crew. As a result of that rescue, seeing their heroic efforts first hand, Reverend Law dedicated the rest of his life to the men and women stationed at Light  stations and Life-Saving stations throughout the United States. Whether it was bringing his "Floating Library" to stations located on the Great Lakes, regular correspondence with the crews of stations far too remote for a personal visit, or his relentless pursuit of Congress to approve a bill to provide better pay and pensions, Reverend Law became a fast friend to those serving in the Lighthouse and Life-Saving services. To the men and women he served, Reverend Law was lovingly known as "The Sky Pilot of the Great Lakes." A tale of unconquerable optimism, the story of W. H. Law's life is as much the account of the brave men and women of the Lighthouse Service and Life-Saving Service as it is the saga of a long and rewarding life in the service of others. (M). $17.95. 

14120. Dresser, Thomas, Herb Foster & Jay Schofield. Martha’s Vineyard in World War II. Charleston. 2014. 192p. Soft wraps. Illustrated with over 50 photos. The small, tight-knit island community of Martha’s Vineyard was irrevocably transformed by World War II. From rationing and blackouts to a military presence in Chilmark, the war was brought home to the residents of the island. In the air, pilots flew training missions from the Martha’s Vineyard Naval Auxiliary Air Facility. At sea, ferryboats served as hospital ships in the D-Day invasion, while enemy submarines lurked offshore. Mock invasions were undertaken by military forces from across Vineyard Sound, and remote sites were used for training missions and bombing practice. Residents participated in the war effort by buying war bonds, supporting USO activities and conducting air raid drills. Remnants and reminiscences of this illustrious past can still be found today. Join authors Thomas Dresser, Herb Foster and Jay Schofield as they revive the story of this resilient island during World War II. (M). $19.99. (x)

1506. na. Cape Lookout National Seashore. Cape Lookout Lighthouse Keeper’s Dwelling ( 1907) Historic Structure Report. Cultural Resources Division, Southeast Regional Office, National Park Service. 2004. 87p. Soft wraps. Historic Structure Reports provide a valuable foundation for the rehabilitation, restoration, stabilization or reconstruction of historic structures. Such a report is particularly important for finding or fabricating significant missing architectural details and other items that would have been found on such structures, and for documenting the history and changes to such structures over time. This allows one to recapture the appearance of a property at one particular period of its history, removing later additions, or substantially modifying existing historic fabric. In this case, the Cape Lookout, North Carolina Lighthouse Keeper’s Dwelling (1907) was studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Life-Saving Service records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. The Barden House, as the structure is now known, was the third Keeper's Dwelling built at the lighthouse station and was occupied by the lighthouse keeper and his family from the time it was completed in the fall of 1907 until the 1930s. In 1957, the Coast Guard, which had taken over operation of the nation's lighthouses in 1939, made the decision to surplus many of the buildings at the lighthouse station and at the Coast Guard Station. In 1958, Dr. Graham Barden acquired the Keeper's Dwelling and relocated it about 1.1 mile southwest of its original site. The architect for the original design of the Barden House has not been identified, but the plans were originally developed around 1886 in Baltimore by the engineering department of the Lighthouse Board. Those plans were modified around 1904 and used for construction of the house, which was completed in October 1907. Included as part of that construction project was a new summer kitchen and a brick and concrete cistern, both of which remain on their original sites near the lighthouse. The authors are able to provide a detailed assessment of how the structure would have looked during the period of interest, and more. The report includes numerous period and current photos and diagrams, architectural plans, and excerpts from Lighthouse Service and Coast Guard books and documents, original specifications, and more for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the building would have contained and looked like. (M). $36. (x)

 

14101. Hartman USCG (Ret), Captain Jeffrey. Guarding Alaska: A Memoir of Coast Guard Missions on the Last Frontier. 2012. 230p. Soft wraps. Alaska represents twenty percent of the land area, twenty percent of the oil production, forty percent of the fresh water of the United States, but after Wyoming, it's the least populated state. Despite that contradiction, the state has an abundance of natural resources, history, and adventure-especially for the members of the Coast Guard that oversee its massive coastline. Captain Jeffrey Hartman served four tours of duty in Alaska with the Coast Guard. He outlines the history of Alaska and its culture and describes his experiences overseeing a number of rescue missions there. Hartman illustrates with personal experience the challenges and dangers the Coast Guard faces in carrying out its missions protecting the Alaska people, environment and maritime infrastructure. He flew helicopters from Coast Guard icebreakers, on rescue and law enforcement missions and managed the search and rescue program on Alaska's waters. Guarding Alaska explains the many important functions that the Coast Guard serves and also examines how it's changed in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks. You'll feel like you're in the middle of the action as you gain a deeper appreciation for the state and the people who protect it. Jeffrey Hartman retired from active duty after thirty years with the Coast Guard as a rescue helicopter pilot and emergency planner. In addition to his four Alaska tours he commanded the Coast Guard Air Station in Borinquen Puerto Rico. A graduate of the USCG Academy, he also has two masters degrees. Interesting account. (M). $21.95. (x)

1482. Mosley, Henrietta E. Point Fermin Lighthouse Families 1874-1927. Pacific Heritage Books. 2013. 132p. Soft wraps. This is the first book devoted to the history of Los Angeles’ Point Fermin Lighthouse, a 139- year old structure that still stands today. The relates the story of families living in this big Victorian house with a light tower, 100 feet above the ocean and their interactions with the world around them. Based on correspondence, memoirs, newspaper accounts, census records, station logs, pension files and other archival materials, the author relates how the lives of the members of four lighthouse families were shaped by their surroundings and the historical events of their times. “Meticulously-researched…engaging and informative…sure to become a standard reference for lighthouse scholars and fans alike." Includes rare family and government images. Nicely done. (M). $19.95. (x)

 

  

1483. Grohman, Adam M. Sentinels and Saviors of the Sea – A Collection of United States Coast Guard History. Volume 1. Adam Grohman. 2011. 289p. Soft wraps. Autographed by the author. This well done volume provides thirty short histories of the United States Coast Guard. Grohman’s work explores the determination, daring, and dedication to duty of the men and women of the United States Coast Guard and its predecessor services from the earliest days of the nation to present. “From the wartime efforts of Coastguardsmen on the bloody beaches of the Pacific Theatre of Operations and on the high seas battling German U-boats during the Second World War to the heroic efforts of Revenue Cutter Service officers and enlisted men … the service members have been vital to our nation’s military efforts. Incidents recounted in this interesting volume include The February Gale of 1880, U.S.S. Rockford, Siege of Cape Florida Light, Rescue Flotilla One, Loss From Eatons Neck, Signalman First Class Douglas Munro, Manomet Station Loss, Fort Mercer and Pendleton Rescues, Dots & Dashes No More, The Wreck of the #3314, and much more. Other histories included in the book recount rescues along the shores of souls stranded in the surf from a sinking vessel or on the high seas from intrepid flight crews aboard fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. These efforts, usually amidst inclement weather and harrowing conditions serve to highlight the diligent efforts of Coast Guard members to those imperiled by circumstance. In addition, this volume includes a host of archival photographs, copious footnotes, and a detailed source listing for each chapter. Wonderful reading, well done. (M). $16.95. (x)

1468. Grohman, Adam M. Sentinels and Saviors of the Sea – A Collection of United States Coast Guard History. Volume 2. Adam Grohman. 2014. 312p. Soft wraps. Autographed by the author. Like the first, this volume provides thirty more short histories of the United States Coast Guard. Grohman’s work explores the determination, daring, and dedication to duty of the men and women of the United States Coast Guard and its predecessor services from the earliest days of the nation to present. “From the wartime efforts of Coastguardsmen on the bloody beaches of the Pacific Theatre of Operations and on the high seas battling German U-boats during the Second World War to the heroic efforts of Revenue Cutter Service officers and enlisted men in hand-to-hand combat with British forces aboard the bloodied decks of the Revenue Cutter Surveyor in 1813, the service members have been vital to our nation’s military efforts. Other histories included in the book recount rescues along the shores of souls stranded in the surf from a sinking vessel or on the high seas from intrepid flight crews aboard fixed and rotary-wing aircraft. These efforts, usually amidst inclement weather and harrowing conditions serve to highlight the diligent efforts of Coast Guard members to those imperiled by circumstance.” In addition, this volume includes a host of archival photographs, copious footnotes, and a detailed source listing for each chapter. Wonderful reading, well done. (M). $16.95.

1493. Chubbs, Harold and Wade Kearley. Facing the Sea: Lightkeepers and Their Families. Flanker Press. 2013. 132p. Hard cover. DJ. In Facing the Sea, authors Harold Chubbs and Wade Kearley have captured an important era in the maritime history of Newfoundland and Labrador. These tales of rescue and tragedy, of love lost and redeemed, describe first-hand what life was like for lightkeepers and their families in twenty-five light stations along the exposed and often inhospitable coast of Newfoundland and Labrador. Most of these stories are told here for the first time in print, and each story is rich with new details and insights from the perspective of these remarkable men and women. Well illustrated with photographs. (M). $38. (x)

1445. Cape Lookout National Seashore, Cape Lookout Coast Guard Station Boat House: Historic Structure Report. 2004. 70p. Soft wraps. Cape Lookout, NC. Cultural Resources, Southeast Region, U.S. Dept. of Interior, National Park Service. Historic Structure Reports provide a valuable foundation for the rehabilitation, restoration, stabilization or reconstruction of historic structures. Such a report is particularly important for finding or fabricating significant missing architectural details and other items that would have been found on such structures, and for documenting the history and changes to such structures over time. This allows one to recapture the appearance of a property at one particular period of its history, removing later additions, or substantially modifying existing historic fabric. In this case, the Cape Lookout, North Carolina Coast Guard Station 1924 Boat-House was studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Life-Saving Service records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. The Boat-House is a one-story, wood framed, hipped-roofed structure built in 1924 for storage and maintenance of life-boats. Altered after it was relocated in 1958, it still retains most of its historic features and original materials. Using these and other sources, the authors are able to provide a detailed assessment of how the structure would have looked during the period of interest, and more. The report includes numerous period and current photos and diagrams, architectural plans, and excerpts from Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard books and documents, original specifications, and more for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the building would have contained and looked like. (M). $44.(x)

(photo not included)

1454. Foley, George F. Jr., Chief, USCG. Sinbad Of The Coast Guard. Flat Hammock Press. 2005. 3rd revised printing. 157p. DJ. Illustrated by George Gray, USCGR with introduction by Mike Walling, author of Bloodstained Sea. This is the true story of Sinbad, the famous mascot of the Coast Guard Cutter Campbell during World War II, whose exploits in his eight years at sea have become legends. His chunky black and white figure is known at a hundred ports, from Greenland where he nearly caused an international incident – to Africa , where he was the guest at a Sultan’s palace. Although famous to thousands of people in many nations, Sinbad was happiest at sea, treading the decks of the sleek Campbell, where he was treated as just another member of the crew. Battles and hurricanes never dulled his love of standing on the heaving deck with spray breaking over his sturdy body. To Coast Guardsmen and sailors all over the world he was a hero and a real salty dog! Appropriately, Sinbad's story was told by a fellow member of the Coast Guard, Chief George F. Foley, Jr., while the fine pictures were drawn by the outstanding Coast Guard Reserve artist, George Gray. Appropriately, Sinbad’s story is told by a fellow member of the Coast Guard. This new edition, the first in 60 years, adds photos of Sinbad, information about the Campbell, and an Introduction by Mike Walling, author of "Bloodstained Sea, the U. S. Coast Guard in the Battle of the Atlantic 1941-1944." (M). $16.95. (x)

 

13434. McDougal, Steph. Lighthouses of Texas. Arcadia. 2014. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Not long after winning their independence from Mexico in 1836, Texans began clamoring for lighthouses. Hundreds of miles of barrier islands, shifting sandbars, and shallow bays made the Texas coast treacherous at a time when few overland routes provided access to the new republic. Beginning in 1852, twenty-eight lighthouses were built along the Texas coastline, on land and over water. Lighthouse service was often a family affair, with husbands, wives, and children working together as keepers and assistants. For nearly 70 years, construction continued as coastal erosion, hurricanes, and wars regularly damaged or destroyed those lighthouses already built. These “sentinels of the sea” lessened but did not eliminate the chance of shipwreck, so lifesaving stations, manned by able seamen with unsinkable surfboats, were established as well. As Texas’s lighthouses were gradually automated throughout the 20th century, many were sold to private owners or abandoned. Today, several have been restored, and two—at Aransas Pass and Port Isabel—still function as aids to navigation. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published, to tell the story of the lighthouses of Texas. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M).  $21.99.

 

13399. O'Neil, Wayne R. Man & The Sea - Shipwrecks of Southwest Washington and Northwest Oregon 1792-1949. 2013. Long Beach. 221p. Soft wraps. Man & The Sea tells the dramatic story of shipwrecks and groundings at the mouth of the Columbia River dating from 1792 up through 1949. These are stories of wooden ships and brave men including the life-savers of the Life-Saving Service, Coast Guard and Lighthouse Service who many times fought to save the imperiled mariners. The author covers over 230 shipwreck and mishaps at the mouth of the Columbia River and surrounding areas, as well as a pictorial overview of construction at Columbia River's North and South Jetties, a history of the U.S. Life-Saving Service, U.S. Coast Guard and the lighthouses in the area. Filled with over 200 period photos, illustrations and maps, this will be a great addition to your library. (M). $34.

13408. Henry, Ellen J. The Lighthouse Service and the Great War. Ponce Inlet. 2013. 72p. Soft wraps. The Great War at the beginning of the twentieth century affected every aspect of American life including the personnel of the Lighthouse Service. It was even proposed that the Lighthouse Service become a part of the U.S. Navy during the Great War. This would become a reality and the operation of the Lighthouse Service and the lives of the personnel were greatly affected. But many questions would arise. What orders would lighthouse personnel obey? What would they be paid ? Could the keeper’s families remain at the light stations as they had for years ? How would the operation of the lighthouses change in this new age of submarine warfare? What additional duties would be required of lighthouse personnel ? These and many other questions are discussed in some detail in the author’s most interesting and readable account. Author Ellen Henryis the Curator at the Ponce de Leon Inlet Light Station Museum in Florida and is an expert on the subject of the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Her well researched account is filled with little known information on the Lighthouse Service during this period and will be a valued addition to your library. (M). $9.95. (x)

13424. Barbo, Theresa Mitchell, Captain W. Russell Webster (ret) and Julia Marshall. The Daring Coast Guard Rescue of the Pendleton Crew. Charleston. 2013. 124p. Stiff wraps. Jack Nickerson and his faithful lab, Sinbad, wake early one snowy Cape Cod morning, ready for winter fun. Meanwhile, miles away in the ocean, the crew of a cargo tanker ship called the Pendleton is in serious trouble. The waves and wind of a raging nor’easter rip the tanker in two, leaving the people to cling for their lives in the wicked, cold storm. There’s no time to waste—the Coast Guard, including Jack’s friend Bernie Webber, leave Chatham Harbor in search of the Pendleton crew. They don’t yet know that Jack and Sinbad have snuck aboard the rescue boat as stowaways. Join the young duo in the front-row seat for the greatest small-boat rescue in American history. Well done, with wonderful illustrations that add flavor to the story. The Daring Coast Guard Rescue of the Pendleton has well-written and well-paced action that keeps youth interested, wanting to read page after page. Historically, the Coast Guard action is correct. Jack’s story is fiction, used to bring children into the story. Sinbad, the black lab always by Jack’s side, was a real dog that hung around the Coast Guard Station Chatham and was loved by the crews. (M). $14.99. (x)

 

13272. Whatley, Merita S. Point Arena Lighthouse. Arcadia. 2013. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The low rumbles of the fog signal and flashing beam of light from the powerful lens have guided mariners away from the perilous waters surrounding Point Arena Lighthouse since 1870. After the great earthquake in 1906 and the rebuilding of the tower in 1908, Point Arena’s navigational aids continued to warn ships away from the peninsula off Northern California’s Pacific coastline. The original tower was replaced with a concrete cylindrical tower that rises 115 feet from the headland. This became the first lighthouse tower in the United States constructed with materials found to be superior to the stone and masonry lighthouse structures of the past. The new tower, crowned with a nearly 13,000-pound first-order Fresnel lens, sent a beam of light 20 miles out to sea and continued alerting ships of the dangers just offshore. This book tells the story of Point Arena Lighthouse, as well as the people and events that shaped its history, highlighting the heroism and dedication of the lighthouse keepers and their familys who served. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99. (x)

13342. Galluzzo, John. Looking Back at South Shore History: From Plymouth Rock to Quincy Granite. History Press. 2013. 176p. Soft wraps. From Plymouth Rock to Quincy granite, the South Shore of Boston has been a place of revolution, relaxation and revelation. Artists have gained inspiration from the meeting of sea and shore, enemy navies have targeted its strategic ports and, in better days, merrymakers have sought its warming sun, cooling breezes, amusement parks and historic and natural landmarks. The Toll House Cookie, the song "When the Red, Red Robin (Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along)" and the U.S. Navy's rallying cry "Don't give up the ship!" all were South Shore born. John Galluzzo, author of The North River: Scenic Waterway of the South Shore and When Hull Freezes Over, gathers the best of his "Look Back" column in this compilation of historic vignettes from South Shore Living magazine. Includes chapter on The First Keepers of Scituate Light and more. (M). $19.99. (x)

 

An Amazing Book: 

13205. Levitt, Theresa. A Short Bright Flash - Augustin Fresnel and the Birth of the Modern Lighthouse. W.W. Norton. 2013. 288p. With 60 illustrations and 6 maps. Augustin Fresnel (1788–1827) shocked the scientific elite with his unique understanding of the physics of light. The lens he invented was a brilliant feat of engineering that made lighthouses blaze many times brighter, farther, and more efficiently. Battling the establishment, his own poor health, and the limited technology of the time, Fresnel was able to achieve his goal of illuminating the entire French coast. At first, the British sought to outdo the new Fresnel-equipped lighthouses as a matter of national pride. Americans, too, resisted abandoning their primitive lamps, but the superiority of the Fresnel lens could not be denied for long. Soon, from Dunkirk to Saigon, shores were brightened with it. The Fresnel legacy played an important role in geopolitical events, including the American Civil War. No sooner were Fresnel lenses finally installed along U.S. shores than they were drafted: the Union blockaded the Confederate coast; the Confederacy set about thwarting it by dismantling and hiding or destroying the powerful new lights. Levitt’s scientific and historical account, rich in anecdote and personality, brings to life the fascinating untold story of Augustin Fresnel and his powerful invention. Quality and contents make this an extraordinary read and a MUST for any lighthouse organization. (M). $25.95. (x)

13244. St. Germain, Paul. Lighthouses and Lifesaving Stations on Cape Ann. Arcadia. 2013. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The maritime history of Cape Ann, on the northern coast of Massachusetts, is filled with stories of heroism, adventure, and human endeavor. The lighthouses and life-saving stations surrounding Cape Ann since the late 18th century have served to protect and safeguard the area’s mariners and major industries. Fishing, shipbuilding, and granite quarrying businesses all flourished under their watchful eyes. They provided artists with spectacular subject matter and attracted tourists from around the world to visit them. This book highlights the heroism and dedication of the lighthouse keepers and life-saving surfmen who served. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99. (x)

 

13183. D’Entremont, Jeremy. Everyday Heroes: The True Story of a Lighthouse Family. Coastlore Media. 2013. 252p. Soft wraps. Wonderfully illustrated with 26 black and white photos and maps. Lighthouses are an essential part of our American culture. They stand as symbols of altruism, strength, hope, faith and guidance. And today, in the age of automation, they also stand as memorials to the lighthouse keepers and their families who once devoted themselves to “keeping a good light” in service to mariners. Traditional lighthouse keeping has passed into history with automation, but there are still those who recall lighthouse life with nostalgia. Seamond Ponsart Roberts, daughter of a lighthouse keeper, is one of those people. Seamond was born while her parents lived at the rugged Dumpling Rock Light Station off Dartmouth, Massachusetts. She went on to spend the rest of her youth at two other southeastern Massachusetts light stations: Cuttyhunk Island and West Chop on Martha’s Vineyard. During her lighthouse years, Seamond experienced good times and bad, tragedy and heroism. She is a born storyteller who has always shared her memories with family and friends, and her unique story is now told in the new book - Everyday Heroes: The True Story of a Lighthouse Family. “I am, and always will be, a lighthouse keeper's daughter. I had the good fortune to be born to a different kind of childhood. I didn't recognize this fact back when I was small. I thought that everybody lived like we did on our little island of Cuttyhunk, Massachusetts, which in itself was a life apart,” she writes. This is the true story of a family's life at lighthouses on the edge of civilization. It's a story of adventure, danger, devotion to duty, and love. Seamond Ponsart Roberts shares her memories and emotions with good humor, a sharp eye for detail, and above all an appreciation for a way of life that has passed into history. (M). $16.99. (x)

 

13213. Potts, Annie. Last Lights - The Hand-Wound Lighthouses of the Bahama Islands. Fish House Press, 2011. 136p. Soft wraps. Between 1836 and 1887, the British Imperial Lighthouse Service commissioned eleven manned light stations to be built as remote outposts in The Bahama Islands. Designed during the golden age of lighthouse construction, these works of art in architecture still stand, continuing to warn vessels off the shallow and dangerous waters of the Bahama banks. Of the original eleven manned lights, only three of these remain hand operated today. They are among the last hand wound, kerosene lit lighthouses in the world. Through photographs of keepers at work and short histories of all the original light stations, this book inspires the continued conservation of these last lights. Through photographs and text, the author brings us into the lives of the builders, suppliers, and the lighthouse keepers of these little known lighthouses. A stunning book, wonderfully illustrated, beautifully composed. (M). $29.95. (x)

 

13189. Richmond, Arthur P. Massachusetts Lighthouses: Past & Present. Schiffer. 2013. 160p. DJ. A must-have book for the lighthouse enthusiast, maritime buff, and anyone who is interested in Massachusetts history, Massachusetts Lighthouses Past and Present describes the more than sixty lighthouse stations that have been found along the coast from Fall River in the south to Salisbury in the north, near the New Hampshire border. The lighthouse station locations are identified using navigational charts and their characteristics, including date established, tower structure, optics, fog signals, and many more significant topics are presented in a straightforward table format. A dozen or so lighthouses that no longer exist, and probably are not as well known, are also discussed. More than four hundred images, some more than 130 years old, show the original towers and stations and are accompanied by present-day photographs of these beacons. Numerous images show the insides of towers and lantern rooms not only in those open to the public for tours, but also in restricted or rarely visited lighthouses. (M). Published at $34.99. Our Price $31.50. (x)

13190. Oleszewski, Wes. Shipwrecks!! Factual Accounts of Obscure Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2013. 176p. Soft wraps. True, factual stories of some of the most obscure Great Lakes shipwrecks ever documented. This book will take you from the 1820’s to the 1980’s, while in the shoes of the sailors, some lost, others forgotten, still others remembered as heroes. Huge waves, frigid weather and terrifying situations - relieve it all in this exciting book. (M). $17.95. 

 

 

13162. de Quesada, Alejandro. U.S. Coast Guard in World War II. 2010. Osprey. 64p. Soft wraps. Illustrated with period photos and artwork by Stephen Walsh. Noted military author Alex de Quesada reveals much of the history of the U.S. Coast Guard throughout World War II. In particular, he draws attention to the little-known story of how the U.S. Coast Guard operated a number of the landing craft throughout D-Day in 1944 as well as providing crucial anti-U-boat patrols throughout the war years. A number of Coast Guard servicemen were lost in these two campaigns, and their undeniable contribution to the war effort deserves greater recognition. The Coast Guard also provided aviators and gunners to the Merchant Marine and manned Port Security Services. These roles are all fully explained and illustrated with rare photographs and specially commissioned artwork. Chapters include: Introduction, Pre-war Coast Guard, The Coast Guard Auxiliary, The Coast Guard at War, Home Front, The Aleutian Campaign, The Battle of the Atlantic, North Africa and Italy, Normandy invasion, Pacific Theatre: From Pearl Harbor to the Philippines, Victory, Uniforms, Bibliography. Quite interesting. (M). $19.95. (x)

13177. de Quesada, Alejandro. The U.S. Home Front 1941-45. 2008. Osprey. 64p. Soft wraps. The outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939 led to cautious attempts to raise volunteer organizations among American men and women, to back the armed forces in the event of the USA becoming directly involved in the conflict. The attack on Pearl Harbor caused a huge surge of patriotic response, and voluntary enlistment in a wide range of armed forces auxiliary and civilian support services swelled vastly. Looking firstly at the background and general character of wartime life in the United States, this book covers a number of these services, providing an interesting comparison with the conditions on the British Home Front and the experiences of other countries caught up in the war, examining organizations from the Red Cross to the Coast Guard and for the first time, containing full-color reconstructions of over a dozen uniformed services. Chapters include: Enemy And Homegrown Facism, Home Defense & Premilitary Training, Patriotic Service Organizations, Humanitarian Organizations, Maritime Services including Army Transport Service – Coast And Geodetic Survey – Merchant Marine – Us Coastguard Auxiliary,·Aeronautical Services including Air Transport Command – British Flying Training Schools – Civil Air Patrol – Relief Wings Inc – Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron – Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, The Workforce including Civilian Conservation Corps – “Rosie The Riveter”: Women Ordnance Workers – Women’s Land Army, Children At War, Select Bibliography, and more. Quite interesting. (M). $19.95.

 

13156. O'Connell, Wil and Pat. Lighthouses of Eastern Michigan. Arcadia. 2013. 128p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. From the Straits of Mackinac to the Detroit River, Lighthouses of Eastern Michigan reveals intriguing stories of lighthouses and the people who depended on them. Readers will enjoy discovering what happened when a large ship fell 20 feet over one of the Soo Locks and the captain commented, "Good-bye Old World," as well as of a persistent ghost that caused havoc with the Coast Guard. Which lighthouse was a construction miracle in 1874? And whatever happened to the lost lighthouses of the Detroit River? A collection of the mysteries, storms, fires, and heroics surrounding the lighthouses of eastern Michigan are waiting within. Authors Wil and Pat O'Connell have spent the last 20 years photographing and writing about the lighthouses of the Great Lakes. Their interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the stations, the men, equipment  and more, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

 

28262. Bostick, Douglas W. The Morris Island Lighthouse: Charleston's Maritime Beacon. History Press. 2013. 2nd. 128p. Douglas Bostick, historian and former director of Save the Light, Inc., recounts the stories of the many light keepers and their families who braved meager provisions, low pay and grueling conditions living on a small island at the entrance to Charleston Harbor. Filled with over 55 black & white photographs. Well done, most interesting lighthouse history. (M). $19.99. (x)

 

20386. Barnett, J. P., THE LIFESAVING GUNS OF DAVID LYLE. South Bend . 1976. 3rd. 108p. Soft wraps. 3rd. updated edition. This is the definitive reference on this well known backbone of the Life-Saving Service and early Coast Guard – the Lyle Gun. Using early records and searching out makers and specimens, the author presents a most complete account of the manufacture and history of these important tools. Includes Manby mortar, Hunt gun, and numerous civilian guns including Hall’s, Coston, Cunningham’s rockets, Galbraith, General Ordnance, Naval Co., Steward, American Ordinance, Sculler, HTP, and many more. Also includes firing mechanisms, faking equipment, projectiles, octants, powder, performance tests, and more. Filled with vintage photos and diagrams, this is an extremely valuable reference on the subject. (M). $21.50. 

13101. Smith, Ken. Coast Guard Follies – My Humor in Uniform. Yeoman House. 2007. 96p. Soft wraps. Ken Smith was just a boy of 18 in 1951 when the government asked him to serve. Despite his flat feet, he enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard and began a three-year adventure that took him from the frigid North Atlantic to a tiny atoll in the South Pacific called Ulithi. This book is Smith's fond recollection of his time in the service, when the only dangers came from the push-push girls, the bad decisions of Lt. Lard-Ass and an ungrounded gooseneck lamp. This is a hilarious and heartwarming story that will appeal to all old Coasties and landlubbers alike. Great reading – takes one back for sure. (M). $16.95. (x)

1343. Workman, Capt. Robert B. Jr. USCG (Ret.), Float Planes And Flying Boats – The U.S. Coast Guard and Early Naval Aviation. Naval Institute Press. 2012. 322p. DJ. With nearly 300 vintage photographs and over 300 pages of text, U.S. Coast Guard aviator Capt. Robert Workman presents a complete picture of naval aviation's rapid development between 1911 and 1938. Frustrated by the lack of information about the Coast Guard's aviation heritage, the author undertook research of his own. The result is this balanced look at early naval aviation that, for the first time, gives full credit to the important contributions made by Coast Guardsmen. He shows that it was thanks to their creativity, skill, and determination, along with efforts by the other sea services, that such great strides were possible. Several chapters are devoted to the inventions of the float plane and flying boat and why the flying boat was considered more seaworthy and reliable. Workman has done a magnificent job chronicling the lives of pioneers and visionaries whose accomplishments led to Coast Guard aviation as we know it today. Well Done! (M).  $41.95.

1369. Kroll, C. Douglas. A Coast Guardsman's History of the U.S. Coast Guard. Naval Institute Press. 2010. 209p. DJ. The author has melded story-telling and the evolution of the Coast Guard in a unique fashion. More a book about Coast Guard heritage than an academic history, this book focuses on a variety of relatively unknown Coast Guardsmen who personify the service’s core values. The author highlights contributions of a variety of individuals, from seamen to admirals on active duty, as well as Reserves, Auxiliary, and civilian members of Team Coast Guard. These heroes, representing a great diversity in age, sex, race, and ethnicity, set an example worthy of emulation and serve as role models for today s Coast Guard men and women. (M). $34.95.

11501. Stover, Douglas. Pea Island Life-Saving Station, Rodanthe, North Carolina, Coast Guard Station #177 : Historic Resource Study. National Park Service. 2008. 83p. Provides a valuable foundation for the restoration of historic structures and insights into the lives of the crews. Report is particularly important in documenting the historic significance of the property and the accomplishments of the Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard crews here. In this case, the Pea Island, North Carolina Life-Saving Station was studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Life-Saving Service records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. Using these and other sources, the author is able to provide a detailed assessment of how the structure would have looked during the period of interest, and more. The report includes numerous period and current photos and diagrams, architectural plans, and excerpts from Life-Saving Service books and documents, original specifications, and more for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the station building(s) would have contained and looked like as well as an in depth look at the construction and work of the Life-Saving Service there. (no longer in print) PDF File on Disc. (M) $29.95. (x)

1376. Licameli, Doris. Rowing To The Rescue: The Story of Ida Lewis, Famous Lighthouse Heroine. 2011. 80p. soft wraps. With mixed emotions, fifteen-year-old Ida Lewis said good-bye to the little house on Spring Street on a sunny June day in 1857. Though her new home would still be in Newport, Rhode Island, it sat on a tiny outcropping of rocks out in the harbor, completely surrounded by water. Ida’s father, Captain Hosea Lewis, was the keeper of the Lime Rock Light. The new lighthouse was big enough for the entire family of six. Then just four months later, tragedy struck. Captain Lewis was no longer able to man the lighthouse. Responsibility for keeping the lifesaving beacon aglow soon fell on Ida’s young shoulders. It was an awesome task, but she was determined to do a good job. She knew sailors would be depending on her for their safety. As time went on, plenty more people would have petite, amazing Ida Lewis to thank for their live. Masterfully written! Ms. Licameli tells the story of a heroine that our girls are sure to idolize! Though expertly written for preteens and young teens, it is a great read aloud parents will enjoy, too! (M). $21.95.

 

Want the perfect book for your children at Christmas ?

Winner of the Time of Wonder Award 2012!

12419. Buzzeo, Toni. Lighthouse Christmas. Penguin. 2011. 32p. DJ. Beautifully illustrated. A lovely child’s tale about a family Christmas at this Maine offshore lighthouse – would Santa even know how to find them ? Frances is determined to make Christmas jolly for her younger brother, even if it means joining family on the mainland and leaving Papa behind on their isolated lighthouse island. After all, would Santa even know how to find them in this faraway spot? But when Christmas Eve is ushered in on a wild storm and Papa risks his life to rescue a drowning man, the children realize that the most important thing about the holiday is being together. As in all great Christmas stories, a happy ending is in store, and Santa finds them after all. Cozy and nostalgic, this story was inspired by the Flying Santa program, a New England tradition since 1929. It's the perfect book for a family to read together in front of the fire on Christmas morning. There's a charmingly nostalgic feel both to the story and to the illustrations, which convey a sense of time and place and are very appealing - a gentle but dramatic story of an earlier time, when just one care package could make a happy Christmas for an entire family. Reading this book with your young ones is sure to become a family tradition. (M). $16.99.

12289. Murray, Steve. Guardians of the Hereford Inlet. 2010. Rio Grande, NJ. 201p. Soft wraps. A wonderful detailed and interesting work documenting the history of the Hereford Inlet, and includes a history of the Hereford Inlet Light Station, the Anglesea Life-Saving Station, and the U.S. Coast Guard Lifeboat Station No. 133. Filled with period photos, maps, plans as well as a chapter on each light keeper, rescues, the life of a keeper, the work of the Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard in the area, restoring the structures and much more. A most interesting work that is difficult to find. (M). $38.

12484. Corbett, Gordon. Keeper of the Light. FogHorn Publishing. 2012. 72p. Soft wraps. Riveting new book from by Gordon Corbett details his grandfather Willie W. Corbett's life as a lighthouse keeper at four Maine lighthouses during the era of the United States Lighthouse Service and the transitional period to the Coast Guard. The book details his early life, through his retirement years, with remarkable stories of a way of life that will never again be repeated. The book includes a large selection of historic family and lighthouse photos and a bonus section on the history of the lighthouse where Corbett was the last official Lighthouse Service keeper on the eastern most island lighthouse in the United States. (M). $9.95. 

12492. Epstein, Becky Sue and Ed Jackson. American Lighthouse Cookbook. Sourcebooks. 2012. 295p. Hardcover. This mouth-watering book takes readers on a culinary journey across America to visit 47 lighthouses, read dozens of short stories about them, both heroic and tragic, and sample more than 300 mouthwatering recipes from eight coastal regions of the United States. The American Lighthouse Cookbook celebrates the local cuisines that have long been the staple of lighthouse keepers. Arranged geographically in eight regions of America, the lighthouses were chosen for their interesting backgrounds and stories. Following the story of each lighthouse is a menu for a modern-day lighthouse meal. Traveling through these pages, you will discover a new way to experience lighthouses and coastal food you won't soon forget. (M). $26.99.

12466. Cook, David E. Hudson River Light-Keepers – A Research Tool. Mayfield. 2012. 48p. Spiral bound. A biographical anthology of at over 100 men and women who maintained the light stations along the Hudson River before they were all automated. This detailed work is filled with lots of great historical and family history of lighthouse keeping along New York’s Hudson River shorelines. Includes a listing both chronologically and an alphabetical of the lighthouse keepers. In addition to listings of the many keepers over the years, includes a biography of each, stations served and great information about the station and his activities and occurrences there. Illustrated with a few photos when available. Packed full of information. (M). $24.95.

 

12480. Salvadore, Joseph E. and Joan Berkey. U.S. Coast Guard Training Center at Cape May. Arcadia. 2012. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Commissioned as Navy Section Base 9 in 1917, the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center at Cape May stands on the site of a former amusement park that bordered the Atlantic Ocean a few miles east of Cape May in southern New Jersey. Dirigibles, submarines, and minesweepers were based here during World War I. Because of its proximity to the ocean and Delaware Bay, the base was used by Coast Guard patrol boats and cutters to chase rumrunners during Prohibition in the 1920s. An airfield was established adjacent to the base in 1926, and in 1940, both combined to become Naval Air Station Cape May. The station protected the coast line from German U-boats during World War II. The Coast Guard took over the facility in 1946, and in 1948, the base became the only recruit training center in the country, today graduating more than 4,000 recruits per year. Through a wealth of vintage photographs, many previously unpublished, and descriptive text, the authors reveal the work and history of this important Coast Guard base. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

12427. Werner, Edward C. U.S. Life-Saving Station, Kenosha, Wisconsin 1879-1915. 87 p. Soft wraps. Interesting detailed work by Mr. Werner (USCGR Ret.) traces the history and operations of the U.S. Life Saving Service at Kenosha, Wisconsin from the station’s commissioning in 1879 until the change-over to the Coast Guard in 1915. A great deal of information is presented regarding the crews, their life at the station and the wrecks and services rendered. Also the station, changes over the years, equipment and more are covered. Well illustrated with vintage photographs. Nicely done, well worth it. (M). $17.95.

 

12366. Truman, Stephen, Grace & Joel. STORMS AND SAND - A Story of Shipwrecks and the Big Sable Point Coast Guard Station. Pine Woods Press. 2012. 208p. HC. Illustrated with 69 photos and illustrations. Great Lakes maritime history encompasses epic stories of heroic rescues, tragic losses, and changing times. Storms and Sand is a glimpse into the world of the brave men of the U.S. Life-Saving Service/ U.S. Coast Guard Station at Big Sable Point, Michigan. The station was located on land that is now part of Ludington State Park. The book tells the history of the station; including the sacrifices by the life-savers and Coast Guardsmen, and their courageous struggles in rescuing Lake Michigan shipwreck victims. Storms and Sand also chronicles lesser-known events in the lives of the men, their families, and the Big Sable Point lighthouse keepers. Great reading about an interesting area. (M).  $29.95. 

  

12211. Wood, Allan. New England Lighthouses: Famous Shipwrecks, Rescues, & Other Tales. Schiffer. 2012. 160p. Soft wraps. Immerse yourself in New England s maritime history through tales of historic shipwrecks and heroic rescues. From Connecticut to Maine, meet the special individuals who helped those in peril. Learn about the disasters that led to the pioneering of travel safety. As told by the people who witnessed these incredible and often life-changing events, stories tell also of the Flying Santa, miracle baby rescues, and paranormal activity. Amusing accounts from one of the last surviving lighthouse keepers also provide an indelible look at life in and around the lighthouses. With an appendix of lighthouses that can be viewed by boat and a glossary of Mariner terms, this is a great resource for historians, maritime enthusiasts, and a guide for tourists and local residents alike. There s something for everyone in this photographic look at New England s lighthouses. (M). $29.99. 

Just Arrived - and even Better than Expected: 

 

  

  

    1276. Cheek, Richard (ed). From Guiding Lights to Beacons for Business: The Many Lives of Maine's Lighthouses. Historic New England. 2012. 240p. Soft wraps. Published by Historic New England, this new book contains an amazing amount of material with a layout and design like no other book published about Maine's Lighthouses. The influence of Maine's lighthouses derives not just from the structures themselves but from the myriad forms of writing, representation and reproduction that they have inspired. This book is the third volume in the visual history series that Historic New England is publishing, and contains  ten detailed chapters by seven authors, with an introduction by Senator Snowe. With 240 pages and hundreds of color and b/w images, the book is loaded with amazing facts and wonderful visual imagery. Some chapters include: Throw Out the Life-Line, Shaping the Towers, All Alone and Ever Ready, Children Lighthouses and Lifeboats, Saving the Sentinels. The perfect, entertaining, Maine lighthouse book and a must-have for anyone with interest in lighthouses and how they have influenced society, advertising and more over the last century. Shown above is an image from the book, Keepers Robert T. Sterling and Frank Hilt, keepers at Portland Head Light. This is a limited printing and sure to sell out fast. (M). $34.95.

12297. Cuzzart, Melissa Leigh. From Surfman to Petty Officer: The History and Legacy of the U.S. Life-Saving Service and the U.S. Coast Guard at Cape Lookout, North Carolina. 2009. Proquest. 110p. Soft wraps. Quietly nestled among the dunes of Cape Lookout North Carolina lie the remnants of what once was a working Life-Saving Service  and Coast Guard Station, and numerous locally owned shanties. Although the buildings are slowly decaying, the stories of these men and their impact on the surrounding community continue to provide a basis upon which the local culture and way-of-life exists. This study details how the presence of the Life-Saving Service and the Coast Guard affected the lives and experiences of the local people and shaped the reflection, memory, and meaning of the site for present day visitors. Through local oral history interviews including past Coast Guardsmen stationed there, as well as the log books of the Keepers, the memory and legacy of both agencies in this unique place offers a link between the past and present. Interesting accounts from this different perspective. (M). $89.95.

 

 

12181. Karentz, Varoujan. The Life Savers - Rhode Island’s Forgotten Service. Amazon. 2012. 252p. Soft wraps. An incredible story of men against the sea and the U.S. Life Saving Service of the 19th century. For almost 40 years, between 1878 and 1917 nine U.S. Life Saving Stations along Rhode Island’s coastline and Block Island saved both ships and crews in weather that froze hands, feet and limbs. The Life Savers were remarkable men of courage and endurance patrolling beaches and signaling ships standing in danger. They rowed their surfboats into dangerous seas or rigged beeches buoys rescuing lives. Their lost stories and history have been captured by Karentz from official government archives and told in their own words. Included are synopsis of Rhode Island’s worse marine disasters as the passenger steamer SS Larchmont in the dead of winter was holed and sunk by the schooner Harry Knowlton with a loss of 145 lives, to the rumored purposeful shipwrecker’s on Block Island who decoyed wayward vessels to their doom to salvage wreckage and cargo. Dozens of shipwrecks and rescues by the men assigned to the Life saving stations are covered with direct words from the rescuers themselves. The Life Savers will intrigue you as how these gallant men fought the elements and how they saved lives. (M).  $14.95.

 

     

1291. Stonehouse, Frederick. Steel On The Bottom - Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 224p. Soft wraps. Historical photos, maps, illustrations and underwater photos. Noted maritime historian Frederick Stonehouse recounts the final voyages of eight Great Lakes ships in this volume from Avery Color Studios, a firm specializing in Great Lakes-related books, posters, maps, etc. The ill-fated vessels chosen for inclusion share only the common trait of being steel-hulled ships whose loss tickled the author's fancy. They include a car ferry lost in 1910, a Netherlands freighter lost in 1953, a sand dredger lost in 1950 and so on. In most cases the ships succumbed to the terrifying storms that all too often sweep across the Great Lakes; the others collided in poor visibility. Yet in reading through these accounts, time and again human stupidity, incompetence, inadequate crew training, poorly done ship inspections and related factors played roles in the sinkings and/or excessive loss of life. Stonehouse does a good job of evoking the tedium, tension and sometimes stark terror of sailing the Great Lakes and enduring its vicious storms. Though none of these vessels will ever enjoy the notoriety of the Edmund Fitzgerald, their voyages and endings are well told in this book, which includes over 80 black & white photographs and maps. This book is sure to please both the Great lakes history and shipwreck buff. (M). $16.95.

1292. Stonehouse, Frederick. Wood On The Bottom- Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 208p. Soft wraps. Historical photos. A follow up to his very popular Steel On The Bottom, this well researched and well written shipwreck book focuses on wood ships that have met their demise on the Great Lakes. For many centuries wood was the preferred material for ships, both salt and freshwater. Masts, cabins, decks and hulls were all made from it. It was strong, resilient, easy to work with and inexpensive. Properly used and maintained, a wooden ship could last for many years. But it was no guarantee of safety as Wood On The Bottom proves beyond a doubt. Stress of storm, collision, poor navigation, bad luck and human folly all played a part in sending thousands of wooden ships to the bottom of the Great Lakes, where they are quietly rotting away into the ages. Wood On The Bottom tells the dramatic tales of a dozen wooden shipwrecks. Some like the Alvin Clark, Lady Elgin and Rouse Simmons (the infamous Christmas Tree Ship) are well known, but others, including the Persian, Oriole and Bon Voyage are cloaked by history. Another outstanding Stonehouse book. (M). $16.95.

  

1278. Cheek, Richard, John Updike and Robert E Cook. Land of the Commonwealth: A Portrait of the Conserved Landscapes of Massachusetts. Trustees of Reservations. Oct 2000. 160p. Soft wraps. 190 color illus. Forward by John Updike. When The Trustees of Reservations was founded in 1891 as America's first private, statewide conservancy, belief in the restorative powers of nature was a relatively new idea in America. Gradually, the colonial impulse to subjugate the wild was transformed into a humanistic reverence for the spiritual power of nature, and land was set aside for preservation. Thanks to the efforts of The Trustees of Reservations and many others, Massachusetts now has 1.1 million acres of land permanently protected from development-more than one-fifth of the state. Land of the Commonwealth is the first photographic book devoted exclusively to the conserved landscapes of a single state. It is both a visual introduction to the diverse natural and cultural sites that have been protected and a tribute to the accomplishments of all those who have worked to safeguard Massachusetts's rich landscape heritage. Organized geographically into five regional sections, the book uses spectacular color photographs by Richard Cheek to capture the scenic, historic, and ecological dimensions of the conserved landscapes of Massachusetts. Each chapter begins with a description of the region's defining characteristics, followed by images of exemplary natural, designed, working, historical, and literary landscapes. Some are popular and beloved, others little-known and waiting to be discovered. Superb work by this nationally recognized photographer. (VG+). $38.

  

1274. Salter, Ben B. Portsmouth Island - Short Stories and History. 1972. Softcover, 80 pages. Illustrated. Portsmouth Island stands as a reminder that some wild places cannot be tamed. Contained within the sandy borders of Portsmouth Island, North Carolina, lies Portsmouth village, a 250-acre hamlet once known to be a bustling Southern Outer Banks settlement bordered by precious, undisturbed beaches. This an easy read about simple times in this once bustling fishing village. Anyone who has ever visited our nation’s outer beaches can appreciate these tales. The stories recount the history of the island and some of it's inhabitants before the last resident moved off the island and before the National Park Service took it over in the 70's. Includes chapters on the Life-Saving / Coast Guard station, shipwrecks off the island, caught in a storm, life on the island and more. Great accounts for those who long to escape the hustle and bustle of contemporary life. Clean, tight. Difficult to find. (VG+). $26.

 

     The entire Coast Guard Crew visited Tammy in the hospital the day after the rescue.

11495. Alley, Margo. Rogue Wave – Wood Island Lighthouse and The Historic Rescue of Tammy Burnham. 2012. Instant. 187p. Soft wraps. On the afternoon of November 29, 1960, two-year-old Tammy Burnham almost lost her life when the small skiff she was in capsized in Wood Island Harbor. Because of deteriorating weather conditions, the United States Coast Guard called off the search for her and her rescuer, Seaman Edward Syvinski USCG. Tammy’s father, Laurier Burnham, was the lighthouse keeper on Wood Island, where the family lived. When told of the accident, Burnham was ordered to remain on the island. Nevertheless, Burnham set out, against orders, searching for them himself. He found his child and the seaman, but both were near death. Burnham successfully transported them to the larger USCG boat. Unfortunately, their problems did not end there as the U.S. Coast Guard boat crew was disoriented in the fog and heavy breaking seas. A local lobsterman would finally render assistance and play a major part in saving little Tammy’s life. There was a delay of over 30 years before the men involved became recognized and awarded. Today, over 50 years later, Edward Syvinski, who held onto Tammy that fateful night and fought for their very lives, authors his own chapter in Rogue Wave, breaking his silence at last. The story has a history of controversy, but readers may easily reach their own conclusions. (M). $19.95.

 

12221. Glen, Susan L. U.S.C.G. Air Station and Group Astoria. Arcadia. 2012. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. US Coast Guard Air Station and Group Astoria was established on August 14, 1964, at Tongue Point in Astoria. It is currently located at the Warrenton-Astoria Regional Airport in Warrenton, Oregon. The group includes Air Station Astoria, the Aids to Navigation Team, Station Grays Harbor at Westport, Washington, Station Cape Disappointment in Ilwaco, Washington, and Station Tillamook Bay at Garibaldi, Oregon. They also supply support for the USCG cutter Alert (WMEC-630), USCG cutter Steadfast (WMEC-623), USCG cutter Fir (WLB-213), the National Motor Lifeboat School, the Electronic Support Detachment at Astoria, the Advanced Rescue Swimmer School, the Marine Safety Detachment, and the Advanced Helicopter Rescue School. In August 2011, the unit became USCG Sector Columbia River. Through a wealth of vintage photographs and descriptive text, the author reveals the work and history of this important Coast Guard unit. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

  

2149. Karamanski, Theodore J. and Deane Tank Sr., MARITIME CHICAGO . 2000. 128p. 200 vintage photographs. Published as part of the Images of America series by Arcadia Publishing. Provides a fine photographic history of maritime Chicago at the turn of the century including the lighthouses, lifesaving and Coast Guard stations. Heavy with shipping as expected, also includes Chicago ’s Navy, yachting shipwrecks and disasters and much more. This compact volume features over 200 early photographs dating from the 1870’s through the 1940’s, drawn mostly private collections, most never before published. and traces the history of these services through photos and text. (M). $21.99.

12268. Sammarco, Anthony Michael. Boston's Harbor Islands. Arcadia. 1998. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. First discovered in 1630, the many harbor islands have come to play an integral part in the history and development of the city. Boston’s Harbor Islands uncovers the fascinating stories of such places as Long Wharf, Castle Island, Minot’s Light, Marine Park, and the Boston Floating Hospital, to name but a few. View the rare photographs of Governor’s Island, and much more. Through a wealth of vintage photographs and descriptive text, the author reveals the history and lore of this historic area. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

12180. Grieder, James Everett and Georgen Charnes. Nantucket. Arcadia. 2012. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Nantucket was first settled by Europeans in 1659. The earliest settlers, known as the “Proprietors,” envisioned a community of farmers and shepherds, but the island found its fortune as a preeminent whaling port in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. During its time under Quaker influence, Nantucket was a cosmopolitan and dynamic place; radical new ideas, like abolitionism and women’s rights, found fertile ground in the Quakers’ firm belief in equality. As the entrance to the harbor became impassible, Nantucket lost its whaling focus and experienced a general economic decline. Ironically, this downturn and the resulting absence of new building, along with modern cultural change, became the springboard for its later revival. Nantucket was transformed into a tourist destination, an artist colony, and a summer home to the wealthy and famous, with a rich maritime heritage and a proud tradition of historic preservation. Through a wealth of vintage photographs and descriptive text, the authors reveal Nantucket’s rich history and her people.  Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

 

2312. MacAlindin, Bob. NO PORT IN A STORM. Scotland . 2000. 146 p. Soft wraps. Now in its second printing. The ships of this book evoke none of the usual romantic images of ships and yet may be the noblest of all. Invariably painted a gaudy red, no other ships spent more time at sea yet sailed fewer miles, their crews compelled to scan the same water and stretch of coastline for the bulk of their working lives. The life of a lightshipman in a hurricane was a sleepless nightmare of holding on, body braced against every combination of rolling and pitching, with tons of water burying the ship. This enthralling book describes 18 factual adventures from many countries including America, Denmark, Ireland, Canada, England, Holland, Scotland, Australia and Belgium giving vivid accounts of life aboard and the many hazards and disasters that occurred. (M).  $34.95.

  

12115. Semones, JoAnn. Sea of Troubles: The Lost Ships of Point Sur. Glencannon Press. 2012. 229p. Stiff wraps. According to Celtic legend, “Thin Places” are areas where two disparate worlds touch, such as land and sea.  And so it is with the rugged coastline of Big Sur. Twisting and turning along steep, craggy cliffs, high above white-tipped waves, the region’s raw beauty is both spectacular and inspiring. Most breathtaking is a gigantic dome-shaped rock which seemingly sits at the edge of the world.  Known as Point Sur, the lofty monolith is surrounded by massive offshore boulders, dangerous reefs, and swift currents.  Its troubled seas doomed many fine ships to destruction.  Even a lighthouse, thought impossible to build, could not end further tragedy. The many shipwrecks chronicled in these pages illuminate specific moments in time. They allow us to reach into another era, shedding light on who we were and who we have become. Thoroughly illustrated with vintage photographs, this work provides a most interesting account of the many wrecks in the area, survival as well as loss. (M). $27.95. 

  

12197. Dunlop, Tom. The Chappy Ferry Book. Back and Forth Between Two Worlds ~ 527 Feet Apart. 2012. Vineyard Stories. 128p. Soft wraps. Photographs by Alison Shaw. DVD by John Wilson. This is a delightful, fact-filled history of one of the shortest, oldest and most unusual ferries in the country – the Chappaquiddick ferry on Martha’s Vineyard. It includes stories about the blind man who skippered it for nearly forty years, the seaplane that struck it in 1937, and the roles it played in the filming of the movie Jaws. The book includes a centerfold illustration showing how the ferry works and a 15-minute DVD of The Chappy Ferry Movie hosted by Dick Ebersol, former chairman of NBC Sports, who has loved the ferry all of his life. Filled with hundreds of vintage photographs and more. Fine reading. (M). $25.95. 

 

  

12193. Shaw, Allison. To The Harbor Light - Lighthouses of Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket & Cape Cod. 2012. Vineyard Stories. 96p. Soft wraps. Photographs by Alison Shaw. Text by Brenda Horrigan. Foreword by lighthouse historian Jeremy D'Entremont. Lighthouses constantly fascinate us. We look at them as links to a romantic past, as sentinels of our shores. Organizations have grown up to protect them, admirers have built their own private lighthouses, and millions of people visit the public ones each year. And nowhere is there more variety, more history, and more beauty than along the Massachusetts shores of Cape Cod and the islands of Martha s Vineyard and Nantucket. Seen through the lens of Alison Shaw, the lighthouses take on a life of their own caught in the reflection of the water they face, their lights shining against a night sky, their windows ablaze with life. The images by Allison Shaw of the twenty lighthouses featured in the book are more than just photography. In this case, the back cover of the book is telling the truth: each photograph truly is a work of art. Plus, the book is a practical guide to the lighthouses of Cape Cod and the islands that also includes historical text within its 96 pages. As an extra bonus, the publishers went out of their way to print the book on some of the best quality paper we’ve seen in a long time for a soft cover book. Lay this book on your coffee table or toss it into your backpack to use as a guide when you go off to discover the joys of lighthouse viewing. To The Harbor Light is nothing short of exquisite and we highly recommend it. (M). $20.95.

 

  

12134. Dresser, Thomas. Disaster off Martha’s Vineyard. 2012. History Press. 160p. Soft wraps. With its rocky coast and treacherous shoals, shipwrecks were a common occurrence in nineteenth-century Massachusetts. Few claimed as many lives as the City of Columbus. The night was clear and the route familiar for Captain Schuyler Wright and his experienced crew as they sailed a ship equipped with the latest technology. Yet with all this, the City of Columbus went down with 103 souls. Over a century later, Eric Takakjian and the Quest Marine Services team located the wreckage of the City of Columbus on the north ledge of the Devil’s Bridge, off the southern tip of Gay Head. Historian Thomas Dresser takes us into the icy waters of the Atlantic as he recounts the terrible chain of events that led to disaster on that fateful night. (M).  $19.99.

2739. Smith, Robert H. SMITH’S GUIDE TO MARITIME MUSEUMS OF NORTH AMERICA. Del Mar. 2006. 6th. 250p. with photo CD of maritime subjects. Soft wraps, spiral bound. This month we have received a pair of books by Robert H. Smith that are valuable additions to any maritime history collection. The first is the latest version of  “Maritime Museums of North America” listing over 600 maritime museums, canals and canal locks, and lighthouse museums. Smith’s work has for many years been the only comprehensive guide in print. In it you will find such information as location and how to get there, phone numbers, description of major exhibits, history, gift shops and more. Every page is filled with vivid descriptions of ships on display, lighthouses and their surroundings, and almost anything the author, researcher or visitor would need to know. Fully updated and illustrated. I use this guide as a reference to contact lighthouse related museums and I am sure that it will be of great use to you as well. This latest edition has pointers to museum Web sites and accompanying photo CD with more than 400 images of maritime subjects from around the country organized by state. (M). Published at $19.95.  Our Price $18.95.

 

     

12147. Baker, Kimball. “For Those in Peril”: A History of the Ocean City Life-Saving Station. 2011. Ocean City, NJ. 40p. Soft wraps. This story of the Ocean City Life-Saving Station is twofold: the story of the station and its rescuers, and the story of those who, through vision and perseverance, saved this important piece of our history from the wrecking ball. This 40-page, illustrated booklet provides both histories, and invites you to take part in making the rest of the story. A special feature of the booklet is a chronology of station-saving events, beginning with the listing of the property for sale in August 1998 and leading to the station’s restoration phase. Also included: an acknowledgement of those who rallied to preserve this beautiful station on site, and a chart with much information about its U.S. Life-Saving Service rescuers. Interesting account of the 1871 Red-House Type station and the later 1882-Type stations. (M). $10.95. 

1287. Wilkins, Mark C. Cape Cod's Oldest Shipwreck - The Desperate Crossing of the Sparrow-Hawk. 2011. History Press. 128p. Soft wraps. Over 40 images. In 1626, the Sparrow-Hawk began its final journey across the brutal winter waves of the Atlantic Ocean, departing from the southern coast of England-with America as its goal. As cases of scurvy and whispers of mutiny rose, the hopes of those aboard the small vessel began to fade. The ever-changing coastline of Cape Cod caused the Sparrow-Hawk to run aground. Desperate to repair their ship and attain their goal of becoming wealthy Virginia tobacco planters, they wrecked her again, forcing them to abandon their beloved ship, and take up residence in Plymouth colony. Revealed by the tides over two hundred years later, the wreckage was pillaged by local scavengers and put on display in Boston. Join Mark Wilkins as he delves into the secrets of the Sparrow-Hawk. (M). $19.99. 

 

  

12135. Lesko, Barbara and Leonard Lesko. Lighthouse Life. Outskirts. 2009. 220p. Soft wraps. Ever want to live at a lighthouse? Crashing waves and howling winds were constants in the lives of the authors of Lighthouse Life once they became owners of an historic New England lighthouse. After living in its 1828 keeper’s cottage for 18 years, Barbara Lesko has written about the experience, both the challenges and delights, that she and her husband Leonard faced at Nayatt Point Light on Narragansett Bay. Once settled in, the Leskos faced many challenges: restoring a decayed beacon, keeping the tower painted, maintaining the granite seawall, and gardening on a wind swept, salt sprayed property. They suffered through ferocious winds and hurricanes, but enjoyed interacting with wildlife, watching the migrations of birds and the approach of weather fronts, as well as the ever changing view of sails and passing ships plus the fishing and oystering off their point. They were determined to bring a lighthouse lens back to the lantern room and had many experiences hunting for appropriate antique lighthouse equipment for the tower and finding period furnishings for the cottage. Nayatt Point Lighthouse went on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. Readers who love lighthouses or who follow nautical history, or who are involved with preservation of historic architecture or environmental issues, or even with collecting antiques will find much to enjoy within these pages. (M). $16.95. 

 

12113. The Fyddeye Guide to America's Lighthouses: 750+ Lighthouses, Lightships, and Life-Saving Stations You Can Visit Today! Seattle. 2012. 242p. Soft wraps. Well illustrated. The most comprehensive travel guide to hundreds of lighthouses, lightships, and life-saving stations in the United States - the Fyddeye Guide to America’s Lighthouses helps families, retirees, veterans, and visitors find the most interesting maritime heritage attractions for the summer travel season. From islands in Maine to the metropolises of southern California, you’ll discover the towering historic structures that have inspired travelers for millennia. You can get close to virtually all America’s lighthouses, and many allow you to climb to the top and stay as long as a month in historic buildings. Includes more than 750 lighthouses, conveniently organized by coastal region and state; brief histories and complete contact information, including website, email address, and phone; three maps with suggested itineraries for discovering lighthouses in New England, Michigan, and California; notes on whether you can stay overnight on the lighthouse grounds, possibly in the keepers’ historic quarters; chapters on lightships and historic life-saving stations, including availability of overnight accommodations; more than 40 images of lighthouses from coast to coast; and more. (M). $17.95. 

12112. Dresser, Thomas. The Wampanoag Tribe of Martha’s Vineyard - COLONIZATION TO RECOGNITION. History Press. 2011. 192p. Soft wraps. The Wampanoag tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah is a group of indigenous people on Martha’s Vineyard. From their legendary giant leader Moshup, Wampanoags can trace their ancestry back more than 10,000 years. The tribe weathered colonization by missionaries in the 1600s and then endured two centuries of domination, only to have its land taken in 1870. However, over the past 140 years, the Wampanoag tribe, which still lives in its ancestral home of Aquinnah, has shown endurance and fortitude as it continues to practice traditional crafts and its tribal heritage. In this book, Thomas Dresser captures the spirit of the tribe, tracing its survival through to recognition by the federal government in 1987, nearly 25 years ago. Brief interviews with elders and current tribal members offer insight into the tribe’s remarkable history. (M). $19.99. 

  

12148. Wright, John Hardy. Provincetown Volume I. Arcadia. 1997. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. On November 11, 1620, the Mayflower landed at the tip of Cape Cod, allowing the Pilgrims their first glimpse of America and their first contact with what was to become their new home. In the nearly four hundred years since their arrival, Provincetown, a charming and historic seaport town, has been an important port for fishing and whaling vessels, a favorite destination for vacationers, and a haven for those looking to make this unique community their home. Established in 1727, Provincetown first found prosperity in the trade and commerce of the fishing and whaling industries. At the turn of the twentieth century, however, the seaport’s beguiling charms and innate beauty were discovered by artists and writers who flocked to the seashore in successive droves. The more than two hundred black and white images in this delightful volume, chronicle the evolution of Provincetown—from the conception, building, and dedication of the Pilgrim Memorial Monument, America’s tallest granite monument, to the activities of residents and tourists at work and play in the three neighborhoods of this enchanting Cape Cod town. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

12149. Wright, John Hardy. Provincetown Volume II. Arcadia. 1998. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. By the beginning of the twentieth century, picturesque Provincetown–– incorporated in 1727––was no longer one of the major seaports of Massachusetts involved in the whaling industry. The fishing industry was still going strong due to the hard-working Portuguese fishermen, but commercial interests looked towards tourism as they had in many other towns and cities. Where once fishing shacks and warehouses dotted the shoreline off Commercial Street, comfortable and well-appointed guesthouses and restaurants emerged to support the growing numbers of day-trippers (many of whom arrived by ferry from Boston) and vacationers who were discovering this charming town at the very tip of Cape Cod. Tourists had visited Provincetown early on. Henry David Thoreau made three walking trips on Cape Cod around 1850, but it was not until the turn of the century that artists, followed by playwrights, authors, and musicians, realized they could live inexpensively in a community that fostered creativity. The artistic and literary culture of Provincetown was enhanced by hangers-on who enjoyed the Bohemian lifestyle. Counter-culture hippies of the 1960s blended in with the colorful personalities of those individuals who came to “P-town” to pursue an alternative lifestyle. Gays and Lesbians have transformed many aspects of the town—both architectural and cultural––in its evolution from a fishing village to a popular and prosperous year-round resort community. Provincetown Volume I focuses on the architecture and social history of this atypical town. This eagerly anticipated sequel features views of the shore, harbor, and ocean, the whaling and fishing industries, art and artists, playwrights and authors, entertainers, and alternative lifestyles.  Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

1215. Sicchio, Mary. The Forgotten Cape: 1940-1960. Arcadia. 2007. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. In the 1940s through the 1960s, the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce promoted Cape Cod as an alluring vacationland where the blue begins, and the frets of life cease. At the same time, a young, exuberant man with a camera, Richard Cooper Kelsey, arrived in Chatham. Kelsey began compiling a photographic record of small town life, of Cape Cod tourist landmarks, and the real people of Cape Cod with precision and clarity. He portrayed a Cape Cod of much beauty and charm, an earlier, more youthful time, and a time just within reach of memory. The photographs in The Forgotten Cape: 1940-1960 were culled from the over 7,000 item Kelsey Collection of the Nickerson Room at Wilkens Library, Cape Cod Community College. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

  

7415. Bunting, W. H. A DAY’S WORK: A SAMPLE OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS, 1860-1920. Part I. Gardiner , Maine . 1997. 384pp. With 225 b/w photographs. Any of you who have seen and enjoyed Mr. Bunting’s previous work Portrait of a Port: Boston 1852-1914, will surely enjoy this companion piece. Once again the author puts together a collection of astonishing historic photographs accompanied by narrative captions. Here the author leads the eye with extraordinary skill as we view coastwise cargo schooners, traveling from island to island by scow, a lumber batteaux shooting rapids, granite-cutting operations, long teams of oxen hauling a building through Waldoboro, a mowing gang, train wrecks, lumber camps, and much more. A grand collection for lovers of Maine , the coast, New England or just an earlier time. (M) Available in Paperback for $35 Reduced to $22.    or    Hardcover $55 Reduced to $33.

20370. Bunting, W. H. A DAY’S WORK: A SAMPLE OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS, 1860-1920. Part II. Gardiner , Maine . 2000. 384pp. Soft cover. With 225 b/w photographs. Any of you who have seen and enjoyed Mr. Bunting’s previous works Portrait of a Port: Boston 1852-1914, and A Day’s Work: A Sample of Historic Photographs, 1860-1920, Part I, will surely enjoy this companion piece. Once again the author puts together a collection of astonishing historic photographs accompanied by narrative captions. Here the author leads the eye with extraordinary skill as we view coastwise cargo schooners, traveling from island to island by scow, a lumber batteaux shooting rapids, granite-cutting operations, ship building, and much more. A grand collection for lovers of Maine , the coast, New England or just an earlier time. (M). Published at $35. Reduced to $22.

     

1291. Stonehouse, Frederick. Steel On The Bottom - Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 224p. Soft wraps. Historical photos, maps, illustrations and underwater photos. Noted maritime historian Frederick Stonehouse recounts the final voyages of eight Great Lakes ships in this volume from Avery Color Studios, a firm specializing in Great Lakes-related books, posters, maps, etc. The ill-fated vessels chosen for inclusion share only the common trait of being steel-hulled ships whose loss tickled the author's fancy. They include a car ferry lost in 1910, a Netherlands freighter lost in 1953, a sand dredger lost in 1950 and so on. In most cases the ships succumbed to the terrifying storms that all too often sweep across the Great Lakes; the others collided in poor visibility. Yet in reading through these accounts, time and again human stupidity, incompetence, inadequate crew training, poorly done ship inspections and related factors played roles in the sinkings and/or excessive loss of life. Stonehouse does a good job of evoking the tedium, tension and sometimes stark terror of sailing the Great Lakes and enduring its vicious storms. Though none of these vessels will ever enjoy the notoriety of the Edmund Fitzgerald, their voyages and endings are well told in this book, which includes over 80 black & white photographs and maps. This book is sure to please both the Great lakes history and shipwreck buff. (M). $16.95.

1292. Stonehouse, Frederick. Wood On The Bottom- Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 208p. Soft wraps. Historical photos. A follow up to his very popular Steel On The Bottom, this well researched and well written shipwreck book focuses on wood ships that have met their demise on the Great Lakes. For many centuries wood was the preferred material for ships, both salt and freshwater. Masts, cabins, decks and hulls were all made from it. It was strong, resilient, easy to work with and inexpensive. Properly used and maintained, a wooden ship could last for many years. But it was no guarantee of safety as Wood On The Bottom proves beyond a doubt. Stress of storm, collision, poor navigation, bad luck and human folly all played a part in sending thousands of wooden ships to the bottom of the Great Lakes, where they are quietly rotting away into the ages. Wood On The Bottom tells the dramatic tales of a dozen wooden shipwrecks. Some like the Alvin Clark, Lady Elgin and Rouse Simmons (the infamous Christmas Tree Ship) are well known, but others, including the Persian, Oriole and Bon Voyage are cloaked by history. Another outstanding Stonehouse book. (M). $16.95.

 

11420. Wright, Larry & Patricia. Lightships of the Great Lakes. Severn Bridge. 2011. 146p. Lighthouse historians Larry and Patricia Wright have researched and compiled a wealth of information on lightships all around the Great Lakes including the St. Lawrence River, with a special chapter on vessel designations. Filled with accounts of life aboard these vessels, their history, storms, damage and more, as well as over 100 vintage photos. (M). Published at $29.95. Our price $28.95. 

20272a,b,c. Gleason, Sarah C., KINDLY LIGHTS – A History of the Lighthouses of Southern New England . Boston . 1991. 175p. DJ. A wonderful account of the evolution of a lighthouse system in Southern New England with considerable historic detail on the 98 light stations in the area. Covering the area from Great Captain Island in Connecticut, to Newburyport Harbor Light on the Massachusetts/New Hampshire border, the author weaves tale of Pleasonton, Winslow Lewis and notable others in the evolution a system of lights. Well done and a most worthwhile investment. (VG+).   $15.95.

  

21430. Wright, David & David Zoby. FIRE ON THE BEACH – Recovering the Lost Story of Richard Etheridge and the Pea Island Lifesavers. New York . 2000. 335p. DJ. Fire on the Beach recovers a lost gem of American history, telling the story of the US Life-Saving Service and particularly the true-life story of the early Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard and one crew of African-American life-savers who fought storms and saved lives off North Carolina ’s Outer Banks. This historic account of the Pea Island surfmen and their keeper leaves nothing to the imagination as the authors chronicle their lives and work on the outer beach. Magnificent detail of their daily lives and of numerous rescues that they performed. Surely one of the best on the subject and great reading. (M).  Published at $26.  Our price $24.95. Now available in soft cover $16.95.

11478. Arrigo, Joseph A. Historic Northern Lighthouses Coloring Book. Apple-Wood. 2002. 48p. Soft wraps. Lighthouses, with their bright, intense beacons of light, were built to guide ships and boats of all kinds, helping to protect them from disaster. Every lighthouse has its own unique story of shipwrecks, heroic rescues, romance, and even ghosts. All lighthouses shown in these These coloring books will amuse, entertain, and educate children of all ages and anyone who is fascinated by these historical towers of light. (M). $8.45.

 

11476. MacKenzie, Morgan. American Lightships, 1820-1983 : History, Construction, and Archaeology within the Maritime Cultural Landscape. Lambert Academic Publishing. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. Lightships served a vital role in protecting U.S. maritime interests from 1820 to 1983. Employed as navigational aids, lightships were stationed along shipping lanes and intercoastal waterways in the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and various estuarine environments in the Chesapeake, North Carolina, and the Pacific Northwest. Addressing gaps in the current historical and archaeological record pertaining to lightships, this thesis answers different research questions and discusses the role of lightships in the American maritime cultural landscape. The development of lightship construction is included as well as an explanation of changes in wooden, composite, iron, and steel techniques. Information regarding characteristic features of lightships focuses on improvements in light and fog signaling equipment. In total, this historical and archaeological study analyses use, construction, and meaning of lightships in America. (M). $98.

11473. McLintock-Hubbard, Doris M., Dory of the Lighthouse. 2011. 72p. Soft wraps. This heart-warming story of the memories of Doris M. McLintock-Hubbard’s childhood days at three lighthouses will captivate your imagination while it draws you back in time, to an amazing way of life that can never again be repeated in the annals of history. The story takes you back to another era lost in time of a lighthouse keeper’s family at three uniquely different lighthouses: The Esopus Meadows Lighthouse, a beacon built in the middle of New York’s Hudson River, Connecticut’s Saybrook Breakwater Lighthouse that is located at the end of a long breakwater, and the land-based Eatons Neck Lighthouse, built to mark the entrance to Long Island Sound’s Huntington Bay. You will be captivated as you read the pages of the home-spun recollections from the days of yesteryear as seen through the eyes of a child and now remembered many years later in life. As well as preserving lighthouse history for future generations. Dory of the Lighthouse will be loved by everyone; a book that will be read over and over and treasured through the ages. (M). $10.95. 

11463. Wachholz, Ted, The Eastland Disaster Historical Society, The Chicago Historical Society. The Eastland Disaster. Arcadia. 2005. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. More than 7,000 people living in the Chicago area and Michigan City, Indiana, eagerly anticipated Saturday morning, July 24, 1915. The fifth annual midsummer excursion and picnic had been organized by the employees of the Western Electric Company’s Hawthorne Works. Thousands of carefree merrymakers would enjoy a festive day including a lovely cruise across Lake Michigan to an awaiting parade and day-long picnic. For thousands of hard-working immigrant laborers and their families and friends, it was going to be a day to remember. Instead, the day’s scheduled event turned into a tragedy unlike any other. The SS Eastland, while still tied to the wharf, rolled into the Chicago River with more than 2,500 passengers on board. Nearly 850 people lost their lives, including 22 entire families. The ensuing struggle for survival, and the resulting death, heroism, cowardice, greed, and scandal gripped the city of Chicago. Thoroughly interesting and important account. (M). $21.99.

11431. Whalen, Richard F., Everyday Life in Truro – From the Indians to the Victorians. Charleston. 2008. 120p. Soft wraps. Everyday Life in Truro describes the idyllic days of the Pamet Indians and the storm-lashed hardships of Truro's first families as they worked to carve an enduring settlement amid the sandy soil and dangerous fishing grounds of Cape Cod. Have you ever wondered how life on the Outer Cape used to be, before traffic and summer visitors? In Everyday Life in Truro, longtime Truro resident Richard Whalen, author of the companion volume Truro: The Story of a Cape Cod Town, illuminates Truro's past, describing in fascinating detail the everyday triumphs and tragedies of pre-World War II life on remote and windswept Truro. (M). $16.99.

 

11411. Lee, James J. III. Spermaceti Cove Life-Saving Station – Historic Structure Report. Lowell, Mass. Historic Architecture Program, Northeast Region, National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior, National Park Service. Harpers Ferry. 2008. (Reprint 2011) 312p. Soft wraps. Historic Structure Reports provide a valuable foundation for the rehabilitation, restoration, stabilization or reconstruction of historic structures. Such a report is particularly important for finding or fabricating significant missing architectural details and other items that would have been found on such structures, and for documenting the history and changes to such structures over time. This allows one to recapture the appearance of a property at one particular period of its history, removing later additions, or substantially modifying existing historic fabric. In this case, Spermaceti Cove Life-Saving Station was studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Life-Saving Service records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. Using these and other sources, the author is able to provide a detailed assessment of how the structure would have looked during the period of interest, and more. The report includes a number of period photos and diagrams, and excerpts from Life-Saving Service books and documents for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the station building (s) would have contained and looked like. (M). $78.

 

Walt Disney Pictures has acquired the rights to make a movie based on the non-fiction book “The Finest Hours” by Michael J. Tougias and Casey Sherman. Writers Paul Tamasy and Eric Johnson will pen the script and Jim Whitaker and Dorothy Aufiero will produce the film. The book is about a Coast Guard rescue mission that took place when two oil tankers were torn in half by waves during a nor-easter blizzard. We’ll keep you posted!

11337. Cann, Donald J., John J. Galluzzo, Capt. W. Russell Webster, USCG (Ret.). The Coast Guard in Massachusetts. Arcadia. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The Coast Guard’s deepest roots run through Massachusetts, the ancestral home to three of the five predecessor agencies that make up the service today. The Coast Guard formed in 1915 and since that time has served the citizens of the Bay State at lifeboat stations, air stations, lighthouses, LORAN stations, and radio stations, as well as on lightships and cutters of all sizes. They have protected the Massachusetts coastline during numerous wars, performing some of the most dramatic rescues in American history—from the Pendleton to the Argo Merchant to the Etrusco and more. The story of the Coast Guard in Massachusetts is one of heroism, honor, respect, and devotion to duty. Nicely told by this trio of respected Coast Guard authors. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the stations, the men, equipment  and more, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

11350. Daly, Janet M. Chatham. Arcadia. 2002. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Chatham is a historic Cape Cod town with coastline on Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean, with many stories to tell-tales of boating and fishing, railroads and hotels, churches and theaters, shipwrecks and rescues, and wireless communication and war efforts. With vivid photographs, Chatham brings the town to life from the early 1800s to the 1960s. In these pages, see Chatham's lighthouse, which has warned of treacherous sandbars off the coast and has witnessed hundreds of shipwrecks since 1808, and the Mack Monument, which memorializes one valiant rescue. Visit the South Chatham Village Hall, which has rocked with laughter at Silver Circle entertainments; the Fourth of July parades; the 1912 and 1962 festivities celebrating Chatham's incorporation; and the weekly summer band concerts. Learn how technology changed Chatham from the arrival of the railroad and the building of the Marconi Wireless Station to the construction of the Chatham Naval Air Station, with its blimps and seaplanes protecting the East Coast from German submarines during World War I. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

  

11339. Fowler, Chuck, Dan Withers, Combatant Craft of America. Patrol and Rescue Boats on Puget Sound. Arcadia. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The history of impressive battleships, aircraft carriers, and submarines on Puget Sound has been well chronicled. However, the story of the smaller, fast patrol and rescue boats that have protected its vast inland waters is largely unknown. This book, through more than 200 rare images and engaging text, reveals the fascinating story. It covers Navy, Coast Guard, and Army Air Force craft in the sound, including the famed patrol torpedo boats of World War II. Featuring evocative photographs from the National Archives, as well as veterans’ personal collections, this book highlights these military craft, their proud crews, and essential wartime and peacetime operations. Superb photographs, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

11338. Wardius, Ken, Barb Wardius, NPLH Friends. North Point Milwaukee Lighthouse. Arcadia. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The North Point Milwaukee Lighthouse, neatly nestled in beautifully landscaped Lake Park on Milwaukee’s east side, is a local maritime jewel. Incorporated as part of legendary landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted’s grand design for this scenic urban park, North Point rests far atop a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan, making it one of the highest light stations on the Great Lakes. Three distinctly different lighthouses have been located here, each with its own unique story. Notable keepers include Georgia Stebbins, who came to North Point as a sickly young woman and was transformed by fresh air and hard work into a feisty, dedicated lightkeeper and served with distinction for over 30 years. Abandoned and boarded up for many years, North Point has been resurrected from near ruin. Today, the North Point Lighthouse Friends see to it that this historic sentinel is preserved for future generations. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the stations, the men, equipment  and more, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

889. Williams, Lawrence W., A COLLECTORS GUIDE TO SOUVENIR CHINA – Keepsakes of a Golden Era, Identification and Value Guide. Paducah , KY. 1998. 232p. Soft wraps. Completely illustrated with over 500 color photographs. A hundred years ago, souvenir china was all the rage in the US . For the first time this well known expert from Chatham , Mass. presents a complete guide to the background and manufacturers, along with an in-depth analysis, descriptions, and current values. For those of you who have been collection lighthouse and life-saving commemorative pieces, or who would like to collect pieces from your hometown, this is a most valuable reference. Wonderful reading, with over 500 beautiful, clear color photographs of every type and style, manufacturer’s marks and details. (M). $24.95

11341. Sherrard, Raymond H. (Special Agent, Ret., U.S. Treasury Department). The Encyclopedia of Federal Law Enforcement Patches. Garden Grove. 2000. 232p. Soft wraps. Thoroughly illustrated with thousands of color photographs. The long awaited book by the Dean of U.S. Federal Police Emblem collectors,  is the definitive collector's guide to 4212 federal patches. The author’s comprehensive book covers all federal agencies, combining Federal Law Enforcement Patches Volumes I and II (out of print) with additional new patches into one large reference volume. Full color throughout. This book can help you avoid reproduction patches, and know what patches you need. All of the patches in this book are numbered, and will assit you in identifying the patches you are trading for. Chapters include: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce NOAA NMFS, Central Intelligence Agency CIA, National Security Agency NSA, Department of Defense DOD, Department of Education, Department of Energy DOE, Environmental Protection Agency EPA, Federal Law Enforcement Associations, FDA / HHS / SSA / HUD / OPM, Department of the Interior, Department of Justice DOJ, Drug Enforcement Administration DEA, Federal Bureau of Investigation FBI, United States Border Patrol, Immigration and Naturalization Service INS, United States Marshal Service USMS, Department of Labor, United States Postal Service USPS / USPIS, Department of State, Interpol / United Nations / USIA, Department of Transportation DOT, Amtrak, United States Coast Guard USCG, Federal Aviation Administration FAA, Department of the Treasury, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms ATF, United State Customs Service USCS, Internal Revenue Service IRS, United States Secret Service USSS, Judicial Branch / Federal Courts, Veterans Administration / Department of Veterans Affairs VA, Legislative Branch / United States Congress, Independent and Quasi-Federal Agencies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA, National Science Foundation, Tennessee Valley Authority TVA, U.S. Trusts, Territories, and Possessions. (M). $39.95. 

11340. Sherrard, Raymond H. (Special Agent, Ret., U.S. Treasury Department), Keith D. Bushey and Jacob A. Bushey. The Centurions’ Shield. Garden Grove. 1996. 320p. Soft wraps. Profusely illustrated with hundreds of photographs, (some in color), appendices, biblio., index. This book is THE definitive, LAPD-authorized and comprehensively-researched history of arguably what is the world's most famous law enforcement organization. Included is a comprehensive pictorial guide to the hundreds of badges, patches and other insignia of the LAPD as well as other City of L.A. departments, many of them shown in full-color. Included are the Jack Webb/Dragnet years; rare badge hallmarks, Reel Cops (the LAPD in TV and film), career info, collecting tips, and much, much more! A must-have reference for all law enforcement personnel, researchers and collectors! Well done! (M). $29.95.

8248. Claflin, James W., LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING ALONG THE MASSACHUSETTS COAST. 1998. 228p. 200 vintage photographs. Published as part of the Images of America series by Arcadia Publishing. This is the first volume in a series of photographic histories of lighthouses and lifesaving along the coasts of the United States. Arcadia is a well known publisher of local and regional histories, including the popular Images of America series. This compact volume features over 200 early photographs dating from the 1870's through the 1940's, drawn from my and other private collections, most never before published and traces the history of these services through photos and text. (M) $21.99.

Also available from the same author:  

LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING ALONG THE MAINE & NEW HAMPSHIRE COAST

LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING ALONG THE CONNECTICUT & RHODE ISLAND COAST

 

9230. Applegate, Lloyd R., A LIFE OF SERVICE: WILLIAM AUGUSTUS NEWELL. Toms River , NJ. 1994. 153p. Soft wraps. William Augustus Newell (1817-1901) founded the U.S. Life Saving Service by getting a $10,000 appropriation tacked onto the Lighthouse Bill of 1848. Newell was a physician/surgeon, three-term congressman from New Jersey , the first term being with Abraham Lincoln with whom he roomed, governor of New Jersey and later Washington Territory , White House physician in 1865, Indian agent in the Northwest in his 70's etc. For us, however, his extensive efforts in the establishment of the Life-Saving Service are of considerable interest and the author devotes fully one quarter of the book to these efforts, improvements in equipment and the memorial established by the New Jersey Legislature in 1896 commemorating his efforts. The only comprehensive account of the life’s work of this important figure. (F-). $19.95.

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1166. United States Light House Establishment. “Price List of Standard Articles (for Lighthouse Purposes) Furnished from General Depot, Thompkinsville, New York. 1901”. Washington. GPO. 83p. We have known of the existence of this document but until now have been unable to find it. It includes listings and descriptions of items available from the General Lighthouse Depot in Staten Island, for use by keepers at light stations, depots, for use on light vessels and tenders, and  more. Included are 18 text pages, 44 full page photo plates and 21 fold-out plates of implements and equipment. Prices are included for budgeting purposes when requesting such items from the General Depot (keepers Service basket $5, First Order Revolving Lens $6,328, etc). Plates include steam whistles, automatic sirens,  electric buoy lantern, engines to power fog signals, fog signal house, Daboll trumpet, bell striking apparatus, air pressure lamps, 4th, 5th, 6th order lamps, lightship and tender lamps, table lamp, locomotive headlight lantern, lens lantern, light vessel lanterns, post lantern, revolving clock mechanisms, revolving lenses, keeper’s service basket, oil carrier, dustpan, drip pan, oil feeder, oil measure, and more. A “must” for museums, collectors, writers and researchers on the subject and anyone interested in the apparatus used by the Lighthouse Service. Spiral bound, photo-reproduced copy. (M). $86.

1104. Menz, Katherine. POINT LOMA LIGHTHOUSE: CABRILLO NATIONAL MONUMENT, SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – Historic Furnishings Report. National Park Service. Harpers Ferry. December 1978. 243p. Soft wraps. Historic Furnishings Reports provide a valuable foundation for the rehabilitation, restoration, stabilization or reconstruction of the interior furnishings of historic structures. Such a report is particularly important for finding or fabricating significant missing furnishings, tools and other items that would have been found in the structures or used by the inhabitants. This allows one to recapture the appearance of a property at one particular period of its history, removing later additions, or substantially modifying existing historic fabric. In this case, Point Loma Light Station was studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Light House Establishment records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. Using these and other sources, the author is able to provide a detailed assessment of how the interiors would have looked during the period of interest, what furnishings and amenities would have been present, keeper’s tools and equipment, clocks and more. The report includes a number of period photos and diagrams, and excerpts from Light House Establishment books and documents for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the inside of light station buildings would have contained and looked like. (M). $48.

11162. Contino, H.S.  Shipwrecks of Coos County. Arcadia. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. European settlement of Coos County began with a shipwreck. The Captain Lincoln wrecked on the north spit of the Coos Bay in January 1852. The crewmen built a temporary camp out of the ship's sails and named it "Camp Cast-Away." This was the first white settlement in the area. The men eventually traveled overland to Port Orford, where they told other settlers about the Coos Bay and its many natural resources. By December 1853, Coos County was established by the territorial legislature, and several towns were founded; the history of the area had been completely altered by a single shipwreck. The author has been the research assistant at the Coos Historical and Maritime Museum for the past five years, and has thoroughly researched over 100 local shipwrecks. Covering a 150-year period, she has chronicled the misadventures of the vessels that traveled on the county's two main bodies of water, the Coos Bay and the Coquille River. From small fishing boats to lumber freighters, the vessel types vary greatly, and their stories range from tragedies to simple maritime mishaps. Superb collection of photographs. (M). $21.99

     

10507. Morrison-Low, A. D. Northern Lights: The Age of Scottish Lighthouses. National Museum of Scotland. 2010. 176p. Soft wraps. Northern Lights has been published to mark the 200th anniversary in 2011 of the world’s oldest rock lighthouse, on the Bell Rock or Inchcape Reef, off the east coast of Scotland. The Bell Rock Lighthouse, the world's oldest rock lighthouse situated off the coast of the county of Angus, was built by the famous Stevenson engineers, and has its 200th anniversary on 11 February 2011. Northern Lights celebrates that occasion. This fully illustrated book tells the story of Scotland's lighthouses through objects, charts and photographs, using National Museums Scotland's pre-eminent collection of sea-marking material from the Northern Lighthouse Board, and also items from the Stevenson family. For reasons explained in the book, historic items relating to the building of the earlier Eddystone Lighthouse, located in the English Channel, are also held by the museum, and John Smeaton's stone-built construction there must be seen as the inspiration for Robert Stevenson's structure. Wonderfully illustrated, worth it for the lamp and lens photographs alone. (M). $24.95.

1186. Henry, Karen Anderson. Papa Was a Lighthouse Keeper. Author House. 2004. 76p. Soft wraps. Little Doris Hanson lived in the lighthouse on Chambers Island, Wisconsin, every summer from the age of 11 days to 10 years. Doris's father, Sam O. Hanson, was the assistant lighthouse keeper in the early 1900's. What was it like to live on a remote island in a lighthouse? Doris told of her adventures and unique experiences of the life of a youn girl living in just such a place for much of her childhood. Having lost her mother at the age of 3, Doris learned the importance of having loving relationships with the rest of her family. Her experiences shaped her life and taught her self-reliance. This is the story of one summer on the island. (M). $14.95.

1171. na. RESCUE – True Stories of the U.S. Life Saving Service. Avery. 2011. 224p. Soft wraps. Forward by Frederick Stonehouse. A compilation of U.S. Life Saving Service rescue accounts from the United States Life Saving Service Heritage Association. Exciting true rescue accounts from the Atlantic, Pacific and Great Lakes. Illustrated with photos. Riveting reading. (M). $17.95. Available April 2011. 

1194. Juge, Dick. The Historic Northwest Passage and the C.G.C. Storis - The Story of a Young Man Growing up in the Coast Guard in the 1950s. AuthorHouse. 2007. 300p. Soft wraps. In 1955 Dick Juge dropped out of his final semester of high school to join the Coast Guard in time to qualify for the Korean Conflict GIBill. This book takes you on his journey through the Coast Guard enlistment and training process, and then on voyages aboard three Coast Guard Cutters: Sebago out of Mobile, Alabams, Storis in Alaska, and Duane from Boston. The author tells of boot camp mishaps, formidable icebergs, liberty adventures, and much more as we accompany him in his career. You will feel like a member of the crew aboard an icebreaker as it crosses the Arctic. Good reading. (M). $35.

23254s. Jones, Ray. THE LIGHTHOUSE ENCYCLOPEDIA – A Definitive Reference. Guilford . 2004. 274 p. Soft wraps.  Who was Augustine Fresnel? What is a clamshell lens? When was the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse moved? What is a daymark? Lighthouse lovers and anyone interested in history will find the answers to these and hundreds of other questions in The Lighthouse Encyclopedia. This one-stop resource offers an amazing wealth of information about the history of lighthouses, key people associated with lighthouses, lighthouse technology, lighthouse organizations and much more. Organized in typical A-Z encyclopedia style, this compendium of information allows the reader to easily find historical fact, famous keepers, or lighthouse mechanisms and much more. Lavishly illustrated with over 300 color and b/w photographs, including many archival views of stations, keepers and their equipment, 4 maps and more. This is a one-of-a-kind reference and should prove an essential resource. (M). Published at $19.95.  Our price $15.95.

Special purchase price:

7209s. Shelton-Roberts, Cheryl. LIGHTHOUSE FAMILIES. 2006. 210p. Soft cover. Living in a lighthouse was a way of life for the families of more than 5000 keepers and employees of the United States Lighthouse Service. These quiet people faithfully manned their remote outposts and withstood enemy attacks, hurricanes, and dishonest bureaucrats while saving countless thousands of lives. These men, women and children daily experienced physical hardship, round-the-clock work, isolation, and danger - and the strong bond of family. Though the Lighthouse Service no longer exists, many of the children who grew up at these stations do and their stories are preserved for the first time in this remarkable book. Family tales from Pigeon Point California, St. Augustine Florida, Saddleback Ledge Maine, Old Mackinac Point Michigan, Morris Island South Carolina and many more. Illustrated with over 100 family vintage photographs and a beautiful full color photo of the light as it appears today. This is a book that you won’t want to put down. (M). Published at $14.95. Our price $9.95.

1165. Castro-Bran, Rose. Lighthouses of the Ventura Coast. Arcadia. 2011. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. The Ventura County coast has been illuminated for more than a century by three distinctive lighthouses, united in their mission of warning mariners of coastal hazards and guiding ships to safe passage. Port Hueneme's original 1874 Victorian Stick Style lighthouse stood sentry until it was replaced in 1940 by the still-standing art moderne structure, which guards the only deepwater port on the California coast between San Francisco and San Pedro. The Anacapa Island Light, a cylindrical brick structure in the Channel Islands lit in 1932, was the last new lighthouse on the West Coast. Ventura, originally dubbed San Buenaventura by Fr. Junipero Serra in 1782, extends its "good fortune" to the steamers, warships, tankers, and other craft guided to safety by these navigation beacons. The author, a flotilla commander in the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and a member of the Coast Guard's Aids to Navigation Team, helps maintain California's lighthouses and has been museum curator of Point Hueneme Lighthouse since 2002. The evocative vintage images showcased here are from her collection, local museums, lighthouse keepers' families, and the Point Hueneme Lighthouse collection. Through these vintage photographs and detailed text, Lighthouses of the Ventura Coast uncovers the history of these structures that kept watch over the coastline. Superb photographs of the stations, keepers, equipment and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99.

A Must Read !

 

23439. Lane. Anthony. GUIDING LIGHTS – The Design & Development of the British Lightvessel from 1732. Charleston . 2001. 208 p. Over 200 photographs and illustrations. Soft wraps. Anthony Lane has researched the history of light vessels over a period of many years. Now he has drawn his research into a book that covers the period from 1732 until the present day. These light vessels have protected ships from the sandbanks and treacherous waters surrounding the British Isles throughout war and peace. Until 1986, they were manned by a very special breed of men who lived in arduous conditions to keep the light shining whatever the weather thrown at them. The book is full of drama and technical detail and is a must for any maritime enthusiast. The first lightship in the world was placed at the Nore Sands, at the entrance to the Thames Estuary on the east coast of England , in 1732. About seven years later a lightship was placed at the entrance to the Liffey: it remained on station until around 1782 when the Poolbeg Lighthouse was established. These, and other early lightships were operated by private entrepreneurs as commercial enterprises. The earliest lightships were converted mercantile ships, with lanterns hung from yards. But from the turn of the nineteenth century purpose-built lightships were designed. Through the nineteenth century the number of lightship stations increased. At the beginning of the twentieth century Irish Lights had twelve lightship stations, and three or maybe four spare vessels, but Trinity House had around 65 stations. Dr Lane describes in great detail the construction and arrangement of a typical nineteenth century Trinity House lightship, including the general arrangements, machinery space, crew accommodation, stores, deck machinery, and mooring systems. The first Trinity House all-steel lightship was No 81, completed in 1926. The design of steel lightships varied through the ensuing years. Dr Lane gives a detailed description of a typical steel lightship and also documents changes in the design as they developed over the years. A separate chapter is devoted to lanterns, lights, and optics and another to the various types of fog signaling equipment. Includes superb photographs and information on early burners, reflector lamps and much more. Thanks should go to the author, for there is a wealth of information here that might have been lost had not Dr Lane recorded it. Working life on board Trinity House lightships is described too, and a hard life it was. Includes rarely seen views of crew spaces, working spaces and much more. The book concludes with a chapter on lightvessel automation and records the present whereabouts and condition of the surviving British and Irish light vessels. The book has many excellent photos and drawings showing details of machinery and equipment, vessels, and lightshipmen at work and relaxing. An entire chapter consists of a photographic survey of steel lightships. It is obvious that this book has been meticulously researched and it is likely to become a standard reference book for the future. This is surely a Must Read whether you are interested in US or British lightships, many of the photos and information pertain to both and should not be missed. (M).  $76.

7452. Noble, Dennis L., LIGHTHOUSES & KEEPERS - The U. S. Lighthouse Service and Its Legacy. 1997. Annapolis. 244p. DJ. Certain to capture the imagination of his readers, this renown author tells of shipwrecks, rescues, and of tending the lights during long and lonely nights. All aspects of this fascinating topic are covered including not only the work at the lighthouses and lightships, but also the keepers, buoy tenders, buoys, fog signals and electronic aids. A book with a special, personal appeal, great reading. (M). Retail $36.95. Our price $27.95.

  

1103. McCarthy, James F. “Jay”. Collision at Sea – The True Story of the Collision and Sinking of U.S.C.G. Lightship RELIEF LV-78 / WAL-505, and Other Memories and Photos of Life Aboard RELIEF Lightship 78/505. Infinity. 2010. 84p. Lightships were often called floating lighthouses - they were stationed where it would not be practicable to place a lighthouse, in exposed and dangerous locations, such as, far out to sea in deep water, close in to shore with soft sandy bottoms or treacherous and shifting shoals, in busy shipping channels or wherever maritime needs dictated. Often, the defenseless lightship, anchored and incapable of avoiding a collision, paid the ultimate price for remaining in this hazardous and vulnerable position. This is a true story of one such collision. The author, James F. “Jay” McCarthy, served 2 years on the RELIEF Lightship LV-78/WAL-505. He speaks with firsthand knowledge of the ship and crew. He was shipmates with a number of the crew that survived the collision by the freighter SS Green Bay and the sinking of the lightship. He tells the whole story - pre-collision, collision and post-collision and draws from excerpts of the Official U.S.C.G. Joint Marine Board of Investigation into the collision between the SS Green Bay and the USCG Lightship RELIEF 78 / WAL 505, and the survivors story, as told largely in the words and memories of RELIEF LV 78/505 survivor Bobbie R. Pierce, BM3. He attempts to tell this story in chronological order, with a view into what was occurring on both ships during this timeframe. Most interesting look into the lives and dangers of these “lightship sailors”. Well illustrated with crew and ship photos. (M). $11.95. 

     

1133. Costopoulos, Nina. Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends. Crane hill. 2003. 116p. Soft wraps. Following on the heels of Crane Hill's best selling Lighthouse Ghosts (now in its sixth printing), Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends brings fans of watery hauntings more of their favorite lore. Author Costopoulos here weaves more than two dozen tales of mystery surrounding some of America's best know beacons, including St. Simon's Island, New London Ledge, Yaquina Bay, Saginaw River, Tillamook, Thunderbay Island, and more. Covering the extent of coastal America and the Great Lakes, Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends also runs the gamut of sprites, spirits, mysteries, miracles, and madness. Lighthouse fans will consider this unique volume a must-have. The stories featured in Lighthouse Ghosts and Legends are drawn from the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts, as well as the Great Lakes. (M). Pub $12.95. Our price $9.95.

1134. Field, Van. MAYDAY! Shipwrecks, Tragedies & Tales from Long Island’s Eastern Shore. Charleston. 2008. 96p. Soft wraps. Since the mid-1600's, eastern Long Island's shoals, sandbars and assorted submerged hazards have caused many an unlucky vessel to become shipwrecked. The frequency of wrecks rose to a grim crescendo during the mid-nineteenth century as New York and New England peaked as shipping centers. Then came the dawn of the twentieth century and the arrival of advanced navigational aids. Although the number of wrecks declined, the high drama persisted as rumrunners and German submarines kept the coast humming with rumors and anticipation. In MAYDAY!, author Van R. Field painstakingly assembles a compendium of Long Island's most harrowing, amazing and notorious shipwrecks and ocean-going incidents. (M). Pub $17.99. Our price $14.99.

10508. Owens, James E. U. S. Life Saving Coloring Book. Schiffer. 2010. 50p. Soft wraps. Illustrated with 48 drawings. The history of the nation's Life Saving Service comes alive in this 50-page activity book, with scenes of life on the sea and water rescues depicted. Color the pages while learning about efforts to aid shipwrecked sailors and the fates of wrecked ships. From Massachusetts, to the Great Lakes, and the East and West Coasts, the history of lifesaving stations can be preserved through this fun and colorful activity. Grades 3-6 recommended (great for use with colored pencils). (M). $6.99. 

9496. Peterson, Douglas, (U.S.C.G. Retired) U. S. LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE TENDERS. Eastwind Publishing. 2000. 169p. DJ. This is the first book to feature all of the lighthouse tenders and auxiliary craft of the United States Lighthouse service from 1840 until 1939. Lighthouse Tenders, the lifeline to the keepers of America's lighthouses and lightships, towed lightships, tended buoys, carried necessities and saved lives day and night, in weather fair or foul. Without these services the keepers of America 's lighthouses and lightships could not have survived. More than 150 years ago the first tender was launched, to be followed by 300 ships of varying design used for lighthouse service-all of which are presented in this thoroughly researched book. Vintage photographs, drawings, plans and statistics illustrate the historic profile of each ship. This long awaited book recognizes these often overlooked ships of the U.S. Lighthouse Service and their important contribution to America 's maritime heritage. 9.5"x9.5", hardbound. 175+ b/w photos and plans. Out of print - difficult to find. (M). $79.95.

    

10507. Morrison-Low, A. D. Northern Lights: The Age of Scottish Lighthouses. National Museum of Scotland. 2010. 176p. Soft wraps. Northern Lights has been published to mark the 200th anniversary in 2011 of the world’s oldest rock lighthouse, on the Bell Rock or Inchcape Reef, off the east coast of Scotland. The Bell Rock Lighthouse, the world's oldest rock lighthouse situated off the coast of the county of Angus, was built by the famous Stevenson engineers, and has its 200th anniversary on 11 February 2011. Northern Lights celebrates that occasion. This fully illustrated book tells the story of Scotland's lighthouses through objects, charts and photographs, using National Museums Scotland's pre-eminent collection of sea-marking material from the Northern Lighthouse Board, and also items from the Stevenson family. For reasons explained in the book, historic items relating to the building of the earlier Eddystone Lighthouse, located in the English Channel, are also held by the museum, and John Smeaton's stone-built construction there must be seen as the inspiration for Robert Stevenson's structure. (M). Please inquire. 

10509. Medlicott, Gordon. An Illuminating Experience. Whittles. 2009. 144p. Soft wraps. Liberally illustrated. A welcome addition to the slowly growing library of Lighthouse Keepers' memoirs. The author's story begins in 1966 - a time when oil lights were rotated by a hand-wound clockwork mechanism and keepers handled explosive fog signals. Throughout the 1960s and '70s, despite having the technology to land men on the moon, some of our lighthouses were still operated by oil, not only for the main navigation light, but also in the keepers' living quarters. With some of the offshore stations lacking even the basic facilities of running water, a bathroom or heating life onboard was, to say the least, pretty basic. Little did the author realize that he would witness, and become part of, a new technological age that would sweep through the industry. Unmanned lighthouses being operated by remote control via telemetry links to a computer and satellite information provided by GPS. The narrative gives a great account of daily life working in the lighthouse service covering a long period including the mass-automation of stations and the end of manned lighthouses. In turn exhilarating, funny and sad. (M). $31.95. 

10488. Marc, Jacques F. Pacific Coast Steamship China. UBC Press. 2009. 182p. Hardcover.  300+ color and 80 b/w photographs. At the height of Pacific-coast steamship travel in the late 1800s and early 1900s, passengers enjoyed a sit-down dinner served on china with silver flatware. Today, the only places you can still find this china is at flea markets and antique shops or by diving at old dock sites and on shipwrecks. Pacific Coast Ship China identifies and dates shipping china used along the Pacific coast of North America. It identifies more than 280 china patterns used on vessels and in-shore establishments of shipping organizations registered in Alaska, Yukon Territory, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho and Hawaii; it describes patterns used in coastal, intercoastal and transpacific services. In addition to passenger vessels, it documents the china used by freighter operations, oil companies, government services and yacht clubs. This easy-to-use guide identifies almost 300 china patterns. It provides collectors, museum technicians, divers, history buffs and anyone else interested in identifying and dating Pacific-coast ship china with all the information they need. It also includes brief descriptions of 73 Pacific-coast shipping companies and government services including Lighthouse Service and Coast Guard. (M). $79.95.

       

10459. (DVD) Lakeshore Guardians - The Story of Nine Wisconsin Life-Saving Stations. 2010. 59 minutes. Written, shot, and edited by filmmaker Dan Larson who also produced the Keepers of the Door series. Dan Weaver composed and recorded the music score. Steve VanBekum provided voice-over narration. Between 1875 and 1896, nine U.S. Life-Saving Stations were completed along the Lake Michigan coast, stretching from Kenosha to Plum Island in Death’s Door Passage. Staffed by a keeper and a seven-man crew, these “guardians” saved countless mariners wrecked along the shore. Seven years in the making, this 59-minute documentary tells the story of their sacrifice and bravery. Larson has spent the past several years traveling the Lake Michigan coast shooting and documenting what remains of the United States Life-Saving Service. The result is a comprehensive video that includes such topics as the Sturgeon Bay Station’s rescue of the schooner Otter’s crew, the Service’s role in the loss of the Christmas Tree ship, the 1913 winter storm’s impact on the Plum Island Station and much more. (M). $24.95. Our price $23.45.

10470. (DVD) The Keepers of Cana Island Light & Keepers of the Door. 2006. (two documentaries in one) In the Keepers of Cana Island Light, actor Stephen King plays the part of Keeper Clifford Sanderson, who was Assistant Keeper at Cana Island From 1884-1892, and keeper from 1924-1933. Join him as he begins the story in 1867 when plans for the lighthouse were first discussed, and follow the lives and work of each of the eight keepers at Cana Island over the years. Keepers of the Door documents the many lighthouses of Door County, Wisconsin, and the many keepers who dutifully kept the lights burning. Beginning in 1836 at Pottowatomie Lighthouse on Rock Island and looks at twelve light stations, with interviews of relatives of the keepers, looks inside the light towers and homes, and more. (M). $29.95. Our price $28.45.

10448. (DVD) The Lightkeepers with Academy Award® winner Richard Dreyfuss (Jaws, The Goodbye Girl) stars with Emmy and Tony winner Blythe Danner (Meet the Fockers) and Oscar® nominee Bruce Dern (Coming Home) in this warmhearted tale of lost love and second chances. This highly anticipated movie was filmed on location at the Race Point Lighthouse on Cape Cod. The year is 1912. Vowing to swear off women for good, curmudgeonly Seth Atkins (Dreyfuss) takes refuge tending a remote Cape Cod lighthouse. Then, a mysterious stranger (Tom Wisdom, Pirate Radio) literally washes up in Seth's life, with a past full of secrets and a similar aversion to females. But the arrival of two beautiful, spirited women (Danner and Mamie Gummer) will test the men's resolve - and send all four of them sailing into uncharted romantic waters! Regular Price $27.95. Our Price $24.50. 

   

10490. Costello, Linda, and Bruce Foster, Wendy Edelson, Al Mitchell. Lighthouses – A Pop-Up Gallery of America's Most Beloved Beacons. Thunder Bay Press, 2007. Hardcover. From the busy Atlantic waters to the rugged Pacific coast, explore the country's most historic and beautiful lighthouses with amazing 3-D pop-ups. Lighthouses features more than 25 color photographs and original illustrations showcasing America's coastal guardians. From the historical to the technical, author Al Mitchell, a renowned expert in the field of lighthouse study, explains the important roles played by each beacon through the years. This unique tribute includes 5 amazing, architecturally accurate 3-D pop-ups designed by acclaimed paper engineer Linda Costello. Beautifully illustrated pop-ups stand approximately 9 1/2 inches tall and 5 inches in diameter and demonstrate each lighthouse's unique design and function. Pop-ups include some of the most famous landmarks in the country: Cape Hatteras Light, North Carolina's distinctive black-and-white light tower; Old Point Loma Light, the beacon for California's Gold rush traffic; and Florida's prominent Ponce de Leon Inlet Light. This is the ultimate book for admirers of lighthouses and architecture. (M). $28.95.

Lightships of the United States of America Volumes I, II, III by Thomas Schoenewolff:

The 3 volumes of Lightships of the United States of America consist of a comprehensive listing of all the lightships that served under the lighthouse service and the Coast Guard. Each ship is outlined with the technical specifications of service, officers, and crews of each ship. The data and information includes all of the research done by noted lightship historian Willard Flint, as well as from other sources across the country, organizations and historical archives, providing a comprehensive view of the history of each ship. These volumes provide the reader with a complete historical reference of the lightship service in this country. Also included are hundreds of photographs of the lightships including on-station photographs, mechanical drawings, officers, crews and more.

10453a. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume I – Northeast. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 368p. $61.

10453b. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume II – Southeast. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 146p.  $28.

10453c. Schoenewolff, Thomas. Lightships of the United States of America, Volume III – Gulf, Western, Great Lakes. RoseDog Books. 2010. Soft wraps. 188p.  $38.

10425. Majher, Patricia. Ladies of the Lights: Michigan Women in the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Univ. of Michigan Press. 2010. 120p. Soft wraps. Michigan once led the country in the number of lighthouses, and they're still a central part of the mystique and colorful countryside of the state. What even the region's lighthouse enthusiasts might not know is the rich history of female lighthouse keepers in the area. Fifty women served the sailing communities on Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior, as well as on the Detroit River, for more than 100 years. From Catherine Shook, who raised eight children while maintaining the Pointe Aux Barques light at the entrance to Saginaw Bay; to Eliza Truckey, who assumed responsibility for the lighthouse in Marquette while her husband fought for four years in the Civil War; to Elizabeth Whitney, whose combined service on Beaver Island and in Harbor Springs totaled forty-one years. The stories of Michigan's "ladies of the light" are inspiring. "Ladies of the Lights" pays long overdue homage to an overlooked part of Great Lakes maritime history. (M). Published at $22.95. Our price $21.50. 

  

10426. Richmond, Arthur P. Cape Cod Lighthouses and Lightships. Schiffer. 2010. 256p. Hard cover. This is an indispensable reference for the lighthouse enthusiast, required reading for those interested in maritime history, and a necessity for anyone who loves Cape Cod. Step back in time and observe the lighthouses and lightships that marked the shores and guided mariners through dangerous waters surrounding Cape Cod. Experience these maritime marvels and trace through the history of these lighthouses and lightships. Archived plans describe the details of these aids to navigation with more than 500 images, including some that have never before been published. Complete your journey with a visit to these historic spots, using the books comprehensive visitors’ guide. “Cape Cod Lighthouses and Lightships” is so thoroughly researched, so packed with individual narratives and visuals, that it is one of the most comprehensive books on Cape lighthouses to date. (M) $45. Our price $41.95.

10397. Collins, George M. To Guide, Guard, and Rescue: Building the Yaquina Lighthouses, Jetties, and Life-Saving Station. Newport. 2010. 112p. Soft wraps. An interesting new book, actually four tales in one; Chapter One details the establishment of the Yaquina Lighthouse on this site, which was short lived (only three years). The lighthouse here later served as a U.S. Life Saving station. Chapter Two details the construction of the more famous Yaquina Head Lighthouse. Chapter Three discusses the construction of the Yaquina Bay jetties. Chapter Four discusses the establishment and history of the U.S. Life Saving station at the former lighthouse facility. Includes extensive information on the construction, the keepers and men stationed there, the operation of the Light House Establishment, shipwrecks in the area, and much more. Well illustrated with over 100 b/w photos, maps and illustrations. (M). Publisher’s price $21.95. Our price $20.45.

10395. Lee, Ila G., Children of the Lighthouse. Bloomington. 2003. 125. Soft wraps. Children of the Lighthouse preserves the unique experiences of the author, living at a lighthouse during the Great Depression and Worls War II. The daughter of a lighthouse keeper, Lee grew up along the Pacific coast, occupying with her family different light stations in Oregon and Washington.  Featuring historical photographs and letters, this is a great opportunity to relive a bygone era. Great reading. (M). $13.95.

10343. Roberts, Mike. The Last Keeper at Split Rock. St. Cloud. 2010. 180p. Soft wraps. Mike Roberts was the last U.S. Coast Guard officer on duty at Split Rock Lighthouse, the Minnesota tourist destination near Two Harbors that draws more than 100,000 visitors a year. The St. Cloud-area resident has the distinction of being the person who extinguished the landmark's light for the last official time when it was decommissioned in 1969 by the Coast Guard. Evolving technology had made the landmark obsolete. More than 40 years later, Roberts returned to the lighthouse to celebrate its 100th year. This book chronicles his four-year enlistment in the U.S. Coast Guard from 1966-1970, most of which was spent on Lake Superior as a search-and-rescue crew member and as a lighthouse keeper. He notes that "There are tons of books written about lighthouse keepers, but very few actually written by lighthouse keepers." Roberts began telling his life stories to his children and grandchildren as they grew up and now he has published them for us to enjoy. These are his stories of life at Split Rock, of the great Superior, and of making ends meet on the North Shore. (M). $14.95.

2806. Cavallaro, Lenny and Lou Cook, Bob Jannoni. SOLVED: The Mystery of the General Arnold. Carver. 2007. 112 p. Soft wraps. In 1778, the brigantine General Arnold went aground on the White Flat off Plymouth, Massachusetts. More than 70 men froze to death in one of the most horrible naval disasters of the Revolutionary War. Almost two centuries later, the skeletal remains emerged from the waters. Was this the Arnold? The debate lasted for many years. Finally, in this work, the authors solve this mystery and relate the tale of this stricken vessel. (M). $8.95.

  

10302. Ferris, Donald L. Cape Cod’s Anthology of Shipwrecks- A Lifetime Exploring the Underwater Shipwrecks of Cape Cod. East Sandwich. 2010. 754p. Soft wraps. Cape Cod’s Anthology of Shipwrecks is the most extensive collection of stories featuring Cape Cod’s nautical past ever written. Exploring the fleet of sunken ships, that litter the ocean bottom off Cape Cod, Massachusetts, author and diver, Don Ferris, takes readers on a journey from one end of Cape Cod and the Islands to the other, as he explores over 75 diveable shipwrecks and describes their sinking, salvage and modern day state. The book features well over 100 photographs and is chock full of Cape Cod historical information and shipwreck lore. These well documented tales of Cape Cod tell the drama of men battling the raging ocean and powerful currents off the Cape’s shores, daring rescues and salvage attempts. It is also full of humorous stories of Mr. Ferris and his friends and their years spent underwater—tangling with everything from locating shipwrecks and artifacts, to fending off sharks. Here you will find the story of the Vanderbilt yacht, ALVA, the world’s most expensive yacht of her day. The steamer Horatio Hall, and her eclectic cargo, which sank off Chatham, MA. The freighter Port Hunter, full of clothing and munitions bound for the American troops in France. Her subsequent salvage and the loss of millions of dollars worth of goods, caused a senatorial scandal and investigation. The tragic loss of the City of Columbus who took over 100 souls to their graves, in clear sight of Martha’s Vineyard, plus many, many more stories. Quite well done, Wonderful reading whether a diver or not, filled with great Cape Cod lore. (M). $34.95. 

  

10166. Harrison, Timothy and Walter C. Plohocky, BMCS, USCG Ret., Thunder Bay Island Lighthouse and Life Saving Station. Foghorn Pub. 2010. 32p. Soft wraps. This new book tells 3 different stories of the life on the small island of Thunder Bay near Alpena, Michigan.  First is "A Season On Thunder Bay Island" by former US Coast Guard lighthouse keeper Walter C. Plohocky, telling of life on the island for one complete shipping season, March through December. Also included is a history of the lighthouse and the story of Capt John and Celia Persons, the Icons of Thunder Bay Island. Well illustrated with historic photographs. Soft cover. (M). $8.95.

10115. Benchley, Rob and Robert D. Felch. Keeping the Light – The Epic Move and Preservation of Nantucket’s Sankaty Head Lighthouse. 2009. Sconset Trust. 144p. DJ. A lighthouse has stood on Sankaty Head near the village of Siasconset since 1850, the third such aid built on the island. However, in recent years coastal erosion had brought the surf perilously close to the lighthouse, threatening to topple it into the sea with a future gale. Fortunately the ’Sconset Trust took on the project to oversee the light’s restoration and to raise funds to move the light tower safely away from the eroding cliffs. This epic historic preservation project was successful due to a tremendous island-wide outpouring of support. The new ’Sconset Trust book, Keeping the Light, documenting this historic move, has just been released. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of photographs, the book chronicles the formation of a plan, the move and the tower’s restoration, once again the famous "Blazing Star". Beautifully done, this will make a superb addition to anyone’s collection. (M). $98.

10180. Thompson, Kalee. Deadliest Sea: The Untold Story Behind the Greatest Rescue in Coast Guard History. New York. 2010. 309p. DJ. Deadliest Sea by Kalee Thompson is the spellbinding true story of the greatest rescue in U.S. Coast Guard history. It's no secret that commercial fishing on the Bering Sea is easily one of the world's most dangerous and deadly professions. For the men of the vessel 'Alaska Ranger', this fact presented itself on March 23, 2008, when the ship began taking water only to be fully submerged just a few hours later. In "Deadliest Sea," author Kalee Thompson offers readers the harrowing account of the Ranger's accident, and the daring rescue attempt by U.S. Coast Guard helicopter rescue teams  which succeeded in saving the lives of more than twenty of the crew members--thus becoming the single most successful cold-water rescue in Coast Guard history. A fascinating and gripping account for all. (M). Reduced $16.99

   

10121. St. Germain, Paul. Twin Lights of Thacher Island, Cape Ann. Arcadia. 2010. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Thacher Island was named for Anthony Thacher who, in 1635, lost his four children and other family members in a shipwreck during the most severe storm to ever hit the Massachusetts coast. Some time later beacons were established on the island to warn mariners away. In later times, the lighthouses there have played an important role in several wars, including the Revolutionary War and World Wars I and II, when the navy established a radio compass station and lookouts to protect the coast from enemy submarines. A ship bearing a U.S. president almost wrecked on Thacher Island, and the island was used as a witness protection site for a Mafia criminal. Twin Lights of Thacher Island, Cape Ann captures the history, adventures, and intimate stories from over 200 years of lighthouse keepers living on the island, including how the two towers were built and how scientific discoveries were applied to improve the lights over the years. This interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99. 

10122. Coast Guard Sector San Diego. The Coast Guard in San Diego. Arcadia. 2010. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage and recent photographs. Located a few miles north from the border of the United States and Mexico, the U.S. Coast Guard has maintained a continual presence in San Diego since 1935. It was in May of that year that a single air detachment, led by Cdr. Elmer F. Stone, began operating out of a commercial hangar at Lindbergh Field. From those humble beginnings, a base was constructed on 23 acres of tidelands adjacent to the airstrip and eventually formed into Sector San Diego. Through the years, their units and missions have evolved as new technology and changing world events dictated new missions for the Coast Guard. Today Coast Guard Sector San Diego stands as a model of interagency cooperation for the Department of Homeland Security as the Coast Guard works with other federal agencies to protect San Diego's maritime domain. This interesting volume draws images from the Coast Guard archives as well as public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, men, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99.

 

6697. Thompson, Frederic L., THE LIGHTSHIPS OF CAPE COD. 1996. 2nd printing. 112 pp. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. Illustrated with over 93 beautifully detailed photographs. Much sought after, this scarce volume chronicles the history of the lightships in this vital area. Wonderfully detailed b/w photographs enhance the author's vivid description of the history and life aboard these vessels. One of the only volumes ever written exclusively on this subject, this fine work will make a fine addition to any library (M). $14.95. (Wholesale discounts available)

29313. Ryder, Richard G. Seashore Sentinel: The Old Harbor Lifesaving Station on Cape Cod. West Barnstable. 2009. 120p. Soft wraps. This latest account of the history and life at Cape Cod’s Old Harbor Life-Saving Station updates his older work - OLD HARBOR STATION CAPE COD – now long out of print but still in demand. This extremely worthwhile account of the life-savers at the Old Harbor Life Saving Station in Chatham , Mass., is a one of a kind, chronicling not only much of the wrecks and work of the life savers, but particularly looking at the equipment issued to such a station at the time and the lives of the men living and working there. Includes many photographs, wreck accounts, life at the station, moving the station and much more. A most interesting chronicle. (M). $12.95.

1002. Crowell, Marnie Reed. Mark Island Light. Sunset, Maine. 2009. 27p. Soft wraps. Mark Island Light, officially known as the Deer Island Thorofare Lighthouse, was fitted with a fourth-order Fresnel lens showing a fixed white light and was first lighted on New Year's Day in 1858. The 25-foot tower was attached to a one-and-one-half-story wood-frame keeper's dwelling. In 1998, some 140 years after its light beamed for the first time, Mark Island Light entered another chapter in it ownership when it passed into the hands of Island Heritage Trust. To highlight the acquisition of the light, the author has published a comprehensive and fascinating history of the light, its keepers and operational details, as well as a record of the heroic keepers who lived the isolated life we tend to romanticize today. Included in Crowell's affectionate history are vintage and contemporary photographs and drawings and excerpts from journals, letters and newspapers. (M). $13.95. 

1007. Maginley, Charles D. and Bernard Collin. The Ships of Canada's Marine Services. Vanwell. 2001. 288p. DJ. With one of the longest coastlines in the world and a significant inland waterway, Canada possesses an unparalleled civilian fleet providing essential marine services. This detailed work presents an illustrated record of the historical and hard-working ships that have shaped their history and maritime heritage, current to the year 2001. The ships included belong to the Canadian Coast Guard and its predecessors, to the Customs Preventive Service, patrol vessels of the RCMP, and the civilian-crewed vessels of the Canadian Naval Auxiliary Service. These ships include hydrographic survey vessels, icebreakers, fisheries patrol boats, search and rescue craft both station-based and offshore, lighthouse supply vessels and buoy tenders, lightships, tugs, and northern exploration ships. Included are work histories, specifications and photographs (some quite rare) or paintings of each ship are given. Many ships are illustrated in rare old photographs digitally enhanced for clarity, in sketches and paintings by talented marine artists, and in a stunning 24-page colour section within the book. Ship histories have been compiled from many sources, both published and obscure, to provide as complete a record as possible. (M). $59.95.

1019. Foster, Colonel Frank C. and Lawrence H. Borts. Military Medals of the United States. Fountain Inn. 2010. 192p. Soft wraps. Military Medals of the United States, here in its seventh edition, is an authoritative reference work on the subject. Included are complete criteria for every Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine award since 1939. All decorations, service medals, and ribbons shown in b/w or full-color and accompanied by dates and campaigns as well as detailed descriptions on proper wear and display. The many illustrations make this book a truly beautiful reference work. The book also contains detailed information about the various devices worn on each ribbon, guides to the proper wear of medals and ribbons on the uniform, and much more. There is even a special section on United Nations mission medals. Included are: Criteria for all medals listed in full detail with dates and campaigns; Superb front and back color pictures of all U.S. Military decorations, service medals, marksmanship medals and ribbons, plus commonly awarded foreign medals; Separate color ribbon display in correct order of precedence for Army, Navy, Marine, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Merchant Marine awards since 1939; Complete chapter on devices for awards and ribbons – cross referenced with medals; Complete section on wear and display of U.S. Military Medals for all branches; Valuable section on how to claim your medals from the government. (M). $24.95.

  

29371. Murphy, Mary. Preservation Values in the United States: A Case Study of Three Lighthouses. Masters Thesis. Texas Tech University. 2007. 142p. This study is an analysis of the preservation values evident in three historic lighthouses: The Roanoke River Lighthouse in Plymouth, North Carolina; the Old Plantation Flats Lighthouse in Cape Charles, Virginia; and the Old Roanoke River Lighthouse in Edenton, North Carolina. These three lighthouses are compared and analyzed according to the preservation values set forth by Austrian historian Alois Riegl in his essay "The Meaning of Monuments and Their Historical Development" and the values implied in the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. This study serves four purposes: First, this study establishes the relationship between Riegl's preservation theory and the current preservation guidelines in the United States. Second, this study presents the histories and current conditions of three related historic lighthouses together in a single work. Third, this study makes a recommendation of treatment for the Roanoke River Lighthouse in Edenton based on Riegl's preservation theory. Fourth, this study concludes with a summary regarding the current state of preservation theory in the United States, and of lighthouse preservation in particular. Filled with photographs, drawings and illustrations. Worthwhile reading, and an interesting source of reference for those interested in similar restorations. Available in: High quality paperback ($124)  spiral bound ($32) or as PDF on disc ($24).

29325. Karentz, Varoujan. Beavertail Light Station on Conanicut Island. Booksurge. 2008. 242p. Soft wraps. For over 250 years, America’s 3rd oldest lighthouse has stood as a sentinel at the entrance of Rhode Island's Narragansett Bay. The author tells the story of technological innovation and federal bureaucratic conflict as four different organizations, beginning in 1749, attempt to improve operations and reliability of the light station there. Woven into this history, the author follows the early slave trade and Colonists who insisted that the lighthouse be built, and describes the work ethics and reporting requirements of the generations of 'Keepers' who tended the light. (M). $24.99

29411. Osmers, Henry. On Eagle’s Beak - A History of the Montauk Point Lighthouse. Outskirts Press. 2008. Soft wraps. 371p. A history of Montauk Point Lighthouse has been long overdue! Henry Osmers fills the void with a chronicle that is thorough and appealing. The author blends scholarly research with supreme storytelling skills to chronicle this graceful treasure perched atop Turtle Hill, at the eastern tip of Long Island. On Eagle's Beak details many facets of the Montauk story, from the settlement of the peninsula and construction of the light station, to the keepers who staffed it until automation and its modern day operation as a museum. Especially noteworthy is Osmers' coverage of Montauk Light's long struggle with erosion, a problem facing many lighthouses in the nation. With more than 70 photographs, illustrations and graphs, as well as scores of anecdotes culled from diaries, newspapers and ledgers, “On Eagle’s Beak” is perfect for devoted lighthouse aficionados and casual admirers alike. (M). $19.95.

29410. Osmers, Henry. Living on the Edge - Life at the Montauk Point Lighthouse 1930-1945. The story of the Montauk Point Lighthouse is also a profoundly human one. Dozens of keepers and their families called the lighthouse home over the years. Theirs was an often lonely existence, and Osmer does justice to their experiences with two chapters detailing notable keeperships under both civilian leadership and, later, Coast Guard administration. Also sprinkled throughout are reflections of the lighthouse’s numerous visitors over the years – notably an 1861 visit to the Point by Walt Whitman, who wrote a laudatory poem on Montauk, from which the book takes its title. Modernization in recent times ended the era of the lighthouse keeper, and the Montauk Point Lighthouse, now automated, became a museum in 1987. (M). $19.95.

29329. Harrison, Timothy E. Ghost Lights of Michigan – Lost & Forgotten Lighthouses of the Great Lake State. FogHorn Publishing. 2009. 121p. Soft wraps. Michigan has the distinction of having more lighthouses than any other state. Fortunately, many of the state's historic beacons still stand. However, some lighthouses were destroyed and have literally been lost in the pages of time and forgotten by most. Others have been significantly altered and few people are aware of their original appearance. Researched and written by Timothy Harrison, editor of Lighthouse Digest magazine, this is like a time machine taking you back in history to a forgotten era. You will be captivated by the informative text and rare and historic images provided by Harrison, which are all that remain as a reminder of the Ghost Lights of Michigan. (M). $12.95.

29324. Weymouth, Kent. Lighthouses of the Golden State – California’s Shining Beacons. Sacramento. 2008. 200p. Soft wraps. With a population of about 200 people Yerba Buena was a sleepy little town in 1846. The following year, Yerba Buena would become San Francisco. With the discovery of gold at Sutter's mill by James Marshall in 1848, a rush to California began that would swell the population of San Francisco to more than 36 thousand by 1850. Risking their lives for the promise of fortune, men traveled from all over the world to this new prosperous land, at a time when the coast of California and the waters surrounding it were unexplored, dangerous and unprotected. Magnificent structures would rise in the decades to follow, built by brave and adventurous souls. At these isolated outposts, hearty individuals were stationed as light-keepers to protect the ships bringing commerce, supplies and the peoples that would build the west. Step back in time to an era of adventure, hardship, loneliness and isolation, when lighthouses rose on the shores of the Golden State. Exhaustively researched and thus thoroughly informative, Lighthouses of the Golden State offers up a truly complete and detailed history of the construction, purpose, and current condition of the towering structures. Weymouth covers the individual history of dozens of lighthouses, and extensively specifies the reason that each particular lighthouse was built, what the operating procedures for each were, and general points of information and interest about them. Well illustrated. (M). $19.95. 

29310. Helvarg, David. Rescue Warriors: The U.S. Coast Guard, America's Forgotten Heroes. Thomas Dunne Books. 2009. 356p. DJ. The men and women of the Coast Guard are the forgotten heroes of the armed services, writes journalist David Helvarg. Since its founding more than two hundred years ago, the United States Coast Guard has rescued over a million people. On any given day, “Coasties” respond to 125 distress calls and save over a dozen lives. Yet despite having more than 50,000 active-duty and reserve members on every ocean and on our nation’s coasts, great lakes, and rivers, most of us know very little about this often neglected but crucial branch of the military. In Rescue Warriors, award-winning journalist David Helvarg brings us into the daily lives of Coasties, filled with a salty maritime mix of altruism and adrenaline, as well as dozens of death-defying rescues at sea and on hurricane-ravaged shores. The definitive book on America’s “forgotten heroes.” (M). $25.95

29303. Meininger, William F. Recollections of Thirty-Two Years in the U.S. Coast Guard, and Other Ramblings. Authorhouse. 2008. 383p. Soft wraps. Mr. Meininger was born and raised in the Midwest and joined the Coast Guard in 1961. He served on several ships in both the north Atlantic and south Pacific. Returning from overseas in 1965, he was assigned to a small boat rescue station and later a patrol boat. He attended Officers Candidate School in 1970 and completed naval flight training receiving his wings in 1971. He then served as a search and rescue pilot at Cape May, NJ; Kodiak, AK; Clearwater, FL; Astoria, OR and Detroit, MI. He spent his last five years as a staff officer assigned to Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington, DC. retiring after thirty-two years of service in 1993. The author notes that “this is a collection of humorous stories I recall from my time in the service, and shortly thereafter. It is my nature to poke fun at things I find funny, or in some cases, sad. Most, almost all, of these recollections are accurate.” Wonderful account of the author’s thirty two year career in the Coast Guard, well written, funny, a treat to read. (M). $19.95.

29309. Biggs, Jerry. Rescue and Refuge: Florida . Trent ’s Publishing. 2008. 122p. Soft wraps. Lavishly illustrated with 122 vintage and contemporary black and white and color photos, paintings and more. Rescue And Refuge: Florida was written by Jerry Biggs to fill a missing gap in Florida 's maritime lore. The U.S. Life-Saving Service, and its successor, the U.S. Coast Guard contributed greatly in establishing Florida 's shoreline frontier. This book covers all of Florida 's coastal stations with true-life heroic rescue tales of shipwreck survivors, homicide on the high seas, hurricanes, primitive living conditions, “long periods of isolation broken by moments of sheer terror”. But there were good times also and a few chuckles to relieve the tension. There are many factual discrepancies, but still one of the few sources of information on the subject. Almost every page is beautifully illustrated with rare vintage views of the men and the stations that they manned. (M). $21.95.

29261. Borch, Fred L. and Charles P. McDowell. Sea Service Medals – Military Awards and Decorations of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Annapolis. 2009. 184p. DJ. Sea Service Medals is the first and only complete historical examination of all the personal awards, decorations and medals that may be awarded to Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel for heroism, achievement and service. As a comprehensive history of all awards and decorations of the United States' three sea services, this book serves as a valuable guide to the rich traditions of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. It provides little-known historical information on the background and development of each award and decoration, along with details of its design and award criteria. The decorations examined include well-known awards for combat heroism such as the Navy Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross, and the Silver Star. Non-combat heroism awards such as the Navy and Marine Corps Medal and Coast Guard Medal are also discussed. All decorations and medals for achievement and service are examined, ranging from the Navy and Coast Guard Distinguished Service Medals, the Legion of Merit, and the Meritorious Service Medal to the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Coast Guard Achievement Medal, and Combat Action Ribbon. Fifty full color photographs of sea service awards, including illustrations of never-before-published rare Navy Medals of Honor, provide context for this unique history. (M). $34.95. Our Price $31.46. 

29307. Cook, David E. The Light-Keepers of Lake Champlain. Mayfield. 2009. 232p. Soft wraps. A biographical anthology of at least 146 men and women who maintained the light stations of Lake Champlain before they were all automated, this detailed work is filled with lots of great historical and family history of lighthouse keeping on Lake Champlain's New York and Vermont shorelines. Includes a listing both chronologically and an alphabetical of the lighthouse keepers. In addition to listings of the many keepers over the years, includes a biography of each, stations served and great information about the station and his activities and occurrences there. Illustrated with photos when available. Packed full of information. (M). $16.95.

29236. Isom, James C. HISTORY OF THE NEW DUNGENESS LIGHTHOUSE. New Dungeness Chapter, United States Lighthouse Society. 2000. 92p. Soft wraps. The New Dungeness Light Station is one of the oldest lighthouses in the Northwest. It is located at the tip of the nearly 5 mile long Dungeness Spit in Sequim, Washington. The Lighthouse has been in continuous operation, providing navigational aids since its completion in 1857. Several of the original buildings remain intact. Well illustrated with vintage photos, maps and diagrams, this comprehensive work details the long history of this important light station, its keepers and their families, and  the changes to the light station and the new more effective navigational aids that were installed over the years to keep pace with the demands of ships plying the waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Chapters include: Coastal explorations; Land claims; Commerce and the spit; Indian life; United States Lighthouse Service; New Dungeness Lighthouse; Lens, lamps, lanterns; Fog signals; Life at the lighthouse; Chronology and more. (M). $21.95

 

  

28348. Wilkinson, William D. and CDR Timothy R. Dring, USNR (Retired). American Coastal Rescue Craft - A Design History Of Coastal Rescue Craft Used By The United States Life-Saving Service And The United States Coast Guard. University Press. 2009. 185p. Unjacketed cloth. With CD-ROM with 323 b/w illustrations. Long awaited, this exhaustive reference work describes detailed history and technical design information on every type of rescue craft ever used by the U.S. Life Saving Service (USLSS) and the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) from the 1800s to current day. By looking at these vessels, many of which featured innovative designs, the authors shed light on the brave men and women who served in these heroic services. The first of its kind ever to be published in the United States on this topic, the book and accompanying CD provide detailed information, drawings, and photographs (many of which have never before appeared in print) for each type of surfboat, lifeboat, and utility craft, along with a complete list of every boat ever built and assigned coastal rescue station(s). Included are motorized, wind-powered and human-powered vessels. The book is organized into two major sections: 1) a general, historical narrative, and 2) detailed technical appendices. This college text-sized book is 185 pages in length, with about 140 photos and diagrams. In addition, a reference/appendix section on a co-packaged CD will include 323 additional photos and diagrams. The book is co-authored by William D. Wilkinson, Director Emeritus of the Mariners Museum in Newport News , VA , and CDR Timothy R. Dring, USNR (Retired). Mr. Wilkinson has been engaged since the 1950s in the historical research of small craft used for rescue purposes, and is a well-recognized expert in this field. He is currently an official historical consultant to the USCG on this subject. CDR Dring, although not a professional historian, has had previous experience in the Navy working closely with the Coast Guard on harbor and coastal defense, and has a great interest in and respect for the humanitarian rescue operations this Service conducts with specialized small craft. The extensive research that went into this book, including reference to original USLSS and USCG documents held by the National Archives, has had the full support of the USCG’s Historian, Dr. Robert Browning, and his staff. The most comprehensive work on Coastal Rescue Craft used by the United States Life-Saving Service and the United States Coast Guard ever published. (M). $125. Order now as only a limited number have been printed. 

 

6281. vanRoden, Mary. Nauset Light, A Personal History - the1875 Lightkeeper’s House and the1892 Oil House. Lyme , NH . 1995. 82pp. Soft wraps. This wonderful book by the recent owner of the Keepers Quarters at Cape Cod’s Nauset Light Station presents a personal and detailed look at life at this exposed location, as well as the action of the sea and efforts to preserve the buildings. Illustrated with wonderful detailed historical photographs, drawings and more -  wonderful reading. (M)  $19.95.

25237. Quinn, William P., SHIPWRECKS ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST – A Remarkable Collection of Photographs of Maritime Accidents from Maine to Florida . Beverly . 2004. DJ. 244p. Illustrated with over 260 photographs. News photographer Bill Quinn has been taking and collecting photographs of shipwrecks since he filmed the sinking of the Andrea Doria in 1956. For nearly half a century he has added to his remarkable archive, and his books represent some of the largest collections of shipwreck images in print. First published in 1988 and long out of print, Shipwrecks Along The Atlantic Coast has been reedited and redesigned for this new edition. The waters along the Atlantic Coast have claimed thousands of ships over the years. In this classic work, noted news photographer, historian and author Bill Quinn features hundreds of photographs of schooners and square riggers stranded, from the 1870’s to the 1980’s, from rock bound Maine down past the sandy shores of Cape Cod, through the sounds of Sandy Hook , New Jersey and on down the coast to Florida . With detailed text, the author describes numerous wrecks and the work of the Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard over the years. Notable wrecks Include the loss of the General Slocum, the City of Worcester , the Andria Doria, Normandie fire, Amerique fire, wrecks on the many sandy capes on the coast, Diamond Shoal Light Vessel No. 69, and many more. Exceptional vintage photographs and riveting reading. (M). $29.95 Our Price $21.95.

  

29231. (DVD) Portland Head Light and the Lighthouses of Maine's Casco Bay. Portland Head Light is the first and the oldest of all Maine's lighthouses, located in Casco Bay at the entrance of Portland Harbor. There was once seven lighthouses (Portland Breakwater, Spring Point Ledge, Ram Island Ledge, Halfway Rock, Portland Head, Cape Elizabeth East and Cape Elizabeth West) and one lightship that marked the waters of Casco Bay and Portland Harbor. Learn the stories surrounding the keepers and their descendants, their hardships and the lives that they led. (M). $19.95. 

29205. Hawley, Jonathan P. Point Betsie - Lightkeeping and Lifesaving on Northeastern Lake Michigan . Ann Arbor . 2008. 250p. Soft wraps. 61 b&w photographs. Point Betsie: Lightkeeping and Lifesaving on Northeastern Lake Michigan is the compelling story of a key Great Lakes lighthouse whose beam has pierced night skies for 150 years. This rich history recounts the efforts of the U.S. Lighthouse Service, the U.S. Life-Saving Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard on Lake Michigan 's wreck-strewn northeastern coast, near the treacherous Manitou Passage. Much of Point Betsie's story is told in the accounts of dedicated keepers who served there with their families since 1858. Photographs also chronicle the lighthouse's expanding services through the years and the site's transition from early isolation to today's frequently visited attraction on Lake Michigan 's northeastern shore. The author devotes equal attention to the courageous lifesaving crews that served mariners off Point Betsie from 1877 to 1937. Keepers' logs bring to life the heroic rescues from wrecks that surfmen discovered while conducting their lonely night-time beach patrols, and document Point Betsie's central but previously untold role in the area's important maritime and social history. An illustrated, thoroughly researched history of dedicated lightkeeping and courageous lifesaving at Lake Michigan 's famed Point Betsie. (M). $29.95.

2986. Kagawa, Ron M. and J. Richard Kellam. Cobb's Island, Virginia : The Last Sentinel. Virginia Beach. 2003. 128 p. DJ. This one is definitely a sleeper – once I picked it up I was unable to put it down. Cobb's Island, Virginia: The Last Sentinel, co-written by Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture Ron Kagawa and J. Richard Kellam, charts the history of the now-barren Virginia barrier island that was once a flourishing hunting and fishing resort and home to the first U.S. Life Saving Service facility there. However, 99% of the history there relates directly to the Life Saving Service and early Coast Guard there. From cover to cover, the authors trace the work of the life-savers on the island, and particularly the history of the 1875-76 life-saving station and later Coast Guard stations there,  their modifications over the years and finally moving of the Coast Guard station in its entirety to the mainland between 1997-2001. The book is chock full of vintage photographs, architectural plans and much more. Well worth a place in your library. The book is now out of print but we have been able to obtain a quantity of copies, new, never opened. (M). $38.95

29173. Chance, Toby and Peter Williams. Lighthouses – The Race to Illuminate the World. London. 2008. 272p. DJ. Illustrated. Written by Toby Chance, James Chance's great-great-grandson and grandson of Sir Hugh Chance, the last Chairman of an independent Chance Brothers, Lighthouses attempts to fill the gap in lighthouse history concerning the development of illumination technology during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The main characters are James Chance, who started the lighthouse department at the firm founded by his uncle Lucas Chance in 1822; and Sir David Brewster, a radical Scottish optical scientist whose entreaties to the British establishment to take the lighthouse question seriously from the 1820s were largely ignored until a Royal Commission on lighthouse reported in 1861. During this time Britain lost its lead in lighthouse technology to the French, mainly due to the invention in 1819 of what has come to be known as the Fresnel lens, named after its inventor Augustin Fresnel. Fresnel, like Brewster, was an optical physicist but unlike Brewster was entrenched in the French scientific establishment and was hired by the Astronomer Royal to head up the French lighthouse service's investigations into improved methods of lighthouse illumination. The true-life story that follows is of one man and his family's unexpected role in an exciting race to perfect this technology, against European rivals and colleagues, as they strive to regain for Britain the leadership position she had lost to the French in the 1820s. A must for serious lighthouse enthusiasts. (M). $26.99

29199. Noble, Dennis L. and Truman R. Strobridge. Captain “Hell Roaring" Mike Healy - From American Slave to Arctic Hero. Gainsville. 2009. 352p. DJ. Captain “HeLL Roaring" Mike HeaLy remains One of the Coast Guard's great heroes. In the late 1880s, many lives in northern and western maritime Alaska rested in the capable hands of Michael A. Healy (1839-1904), through his service to the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service. Healy arrested lawbreakers, put down mutinies aboard merchant ships, fought the smuggling of illegal liquor and firearms, rescued shipwrecked sailors from a harsh and unforgiving environment, brought medical aid to isolated villages, prevented the wholesale slaughter of marine wildlife, and explored unknown waters and lands. Captain Healy's dramatic feats in the far north were so widely reported that a New York newspaper once declared him the "most famous man in America:' But Healy hid a secret that contributed to his legacy as a lonely, tragic figure. In 1896, Healy was brought to trial on charges ranging from conduct unbecoming an officer to endangerment of his vessel for reason of intoxication. As punishment, he was put ashore on half pay with no command and dropped to the bottom of the Captain's list. Eventually, he again rose to his former high position in the service by the time of his death in 1904. Sixty-seven years later, in 1971, the U.S. Coast Guard learned that Healy was born a slave in Georgia who ran away to sea at age fifteen and spent the rest of his life passing for white. This is the rare biography that encompasses both sea adventure and the height of human achievement against all odds. (M). $34.95

29201. Butler, Karen. Nantucket Lights: An Illustrated History of the Island’s Legendary Beacons. Nantucket. 1996. (151 pp. / 148 illus.) DJ. Lavishly illustrated, Nantucket Lights tells the story of the island’s lighthouses and lightships and the men and women who faithfully kept them. This is one of the most comprehensive and attractive books ever done on the lighthouses of Nantucket. Dazzling images including fascinating historic illustrations as well as recent photographs and paintings, and a carefully researched text illuminate an important aspect of Nantucket’s maritime past. Nantucket's three lighthouses all have fascinating history -- little Brant Point Light, which has been rebuilt more than any other American lighthouse; remote Great Point Light, completely destroyed in a storm in 1984 but rebuilt only two years later; and Sankaty Head Light, the famous "Blazing Star." There's also an excellent chapter on the Nantucket Lightship. Even if you've never been to the "Far Away Island," this book is a must. (M). $24.95.

29202. Hubbard, Sharon, with photography by Dan Driscoll. Quarterboards: A Unique Art Form. Nantucket. 2008. 100p. DJ. Quarterboards explores the tradition on Nantucket of naming homes and adorning them with the type of stunning signs found on ships. ‘Sconset’s 1680 house Shanunga, for example, takes its name from the quarter board salvaged from the wreck of a schooner in 1852. Lavishly illustrated with striking photography throughout, capturing the unique charm of Nantucket’s historic homes, bringing the deftly woven narrative filled with colorful characters and fascinating anecdotes to life. (M). Published at $39.95. Our price $36.95.

29203. Philbrick, Nathaniel. Away Off Shore: Nantucket Island and Its People, 1602-1890. Nantucket. 1993. 273p. Soft wraps. This local best-seller focuses on the real people – great and obscure, famous and infamous – behind the island at the center of a whaling empire. “For everyone who loves Nantucket, this is the indispensable book.” (M). $19.95.

29200. na. Cornfield Point Light Vessel LV-51 – A Connecticut State Archaeological Preserve. Published for the Connecticut State Historical Preservation Office by Historical Perspectives, Inc. c.2006. 24p. Soft wraps. Quite a nice publication, Details the history of Light Vessel No. 51 including her recent discovery in Long Island Sound off Old Saybrook. After serving for 27 years, on April 14, 1919 she was rammed by an oil barge and sank within eight minutes. The crew disembarked to the lifeboat and were picked up by a tug. Booklet includes chapters on lightship history, design and technology, LV No. 51, Life on board, Reminiscences of a retired light vessel crewman, Sister ships, The sinking of light vessel No. 51, Underwater survey of the wreck, and more. Thoroughly illustrated. Well done. (M). $12.95.

4571. Shomette, Donald G., SHIPWRECKS ON THE CHESAPEAKE - Maritime Disasters on Chesapeake Bay and its Tributaries 1608-1978. Tidewater. 1982. 324pp.  7th printing. 2007. 324 p. DJ. Fascinating, detailed accounts of the wrecks and rescues of the area, full of information and stories that will fascinate any reader interested in the Chesapeake and her ships as well as maritime history in general. Covers the 370 year period from the 1600’s to date. Illustrated. With large chronological index of vessels lost in the area. (M)  $19.95.

2999. Frump, Robert. Two Tankers Down: The Greatest Small-Boat Rescue in U.S. Coast Guard History. The Lyons Press. 2008,  212p.  In the tradition of The Perfect Storm, this is a too rarely told, riveting story of a legendary rescue at sea. Two Tankers Down is an improbable true story of men against the sea. In a fierce nor’easter offshore Cape Cod on Feb. 18, 1952, two tankers broke in half. The two ill-fated tankers, SS Pendleton and SS Fort Mercer, were T-2s, a ship type mass produced during World War II when the United States had to build a bridge across two oceans. The U.S. Coast Guard rescued 70 of the crew amid deadly dangers. Noted maritime author Bob Frump has rescued this all but forgotten story that should be told as long as men go down to the sea in ships. Bernie Webber was the least likely candidate to execute the greatest small-boat rescue in American history. The trouble-prone son of a Baptist minister, he’d been well on his way to becoming a juvenile delinquent - until he went to sea. And then, on the night of February 18, 1952, in a raging blizzard off the coast of Cape Cod, Webber, now a young lifeboat coxswain with the U.S. Coast Guard, and his crew performed a miracle. Two big oil tankers had split in two in raging seas, and nothing—not a big cutter, not a sea plane, not a chopper—could reach them in time. Only Webber and his crew of three men,  had a chance. He knew they would probably die on this mission. They were, after all, in an unassuming thirty-six-foot rescue boat that didn’t even have a name but for the “CG 36500” on its side. But he loved this boat—and he knew the inauspicious Coast Guard motto: “You have to go out. You don’t have to come back.” Webber and his crew took the CG 36500 out in sixty-foot waves and saved thirty lives. He and his men won the rarely bestowed Coast Guard Gold Medal for Valor and a place in history that shapes the Coast Guard culture to this day. Two Tankers Down tells their story, capturing the full drama of one of the most gripping sea rescue stories of all time. (M). $16.95

29198. Mattsson, Algot. Out of the Fog - The Sinking of Andrea Doria. Cornell Maritime Press. 2003. 168p. DJ. A trace of  the unsolved mystery seems to follow all ship sinkings through history. This interest is especially keen in the case of the collision between Stockholm and Andrea Doria, two passenger liners that collided at the edge of the fogbank in 1956, even though both were equipped with radar and officers on both ships were aware of the presence of the other. Stockholm was badly damaged but able to return to New York under its own power. Andrea Doria sank soon after the collision. The preliminary hearing held after the tragedy raised as many questions as it answered, as the two companies who owned the ships chose to settle out of court before all the testimony had been given. With no documented resolution, some of those questions remain to this day, but this book provides information and insights not previously available. Out of the Fog describes the events leading up to the collision from the perspective of both ships. The collision itself is covered, as is the heroic and largely successful rescue effort that followed. The book contains testimony given at the hearing, and an appendix provides a legal opinion from an attorney who was directly involved with the case. Well illustrated. (M). $24.95.

29105. Chewning, Alpheus. Virginia Beach Shipwrecks. 2008. History Press. Soft wraps. 128p. 40 b/w photos. The waters of coastal Virginia swirl with tales both tragic and heroic. Join Virginia Beach native Alpheus Chewning as he recounts harrowing stories of storms at sea, loss of life and fortune and the heroism of the United States Life-Saving Service. Marvel at the blunders and bungles that have plagued the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel and learn about the U-boats that lurked off the coast during World War II. Extensively researched and filled with fascinating details, "Virginia Beach Shipwrecks" is a treasure for sea lovers of all ages. (M). $19.99.

  

29190. Eldridge, Dana. Once Upon Cape Cod; From Cockle Cove to the Powder Hole. Brewster. 1997. 112p. Soft wraps. A group of essays describing Dana Eldridge's early years on Cape Cod in the 30’s – so very different from today’s Cape. Written with humor and warmth, this is a must read for anyone with a love of all things Cape. This is a book of essays where time stands still, the way it should. His boyhood adventures remind you of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He had loving, laconic parents, and perfect grandparents. The whole watery world of Cape Cod was full of freedom and adventure for a boy. Here is the classic theme of local, small town life before we began to run away from it. (M). $10.95. 

9191. Eldridge, Dana. Cape Cod Lucky -  In Another Time. Brewster. 2000. 170p. Soft wraps. This sequel to Once Upon Cape Cod treats the reader to more insights and antics of growing up on Cape Cod. Dana Eldridge's unique prose brings us back to a time when young people explored and played with a freedom we rarely see today. This is a story of growing up on the Cape in the mid 40’s and 50’s – one of the last remnants of the unhurried life of the nineteenth century. That Cape is gone now, but Eldridge brings it vividly to life. You’ll smell the salt wind, you’ll hear the surf roaring on the bar, and you’ll laugh out loud at the wonderfully wry stories that fill this book. (M). $12.95.

  

29163. James, Barry C. Lighting the Way - A History of the Copper Harbor Lighthouse. Copper Harbor. 2000. 128p. Soft wraps. Action providing improved navigational aids at Copper Harbor followed closely upon the Keweenaw copper rush. The shipwreck of the John Jacob Astor in 1844 and rapidly expanding Lake Superior shipping traffic influenced President Polk and Congress to authorize construction of the Copper Harbor Lighthouse in 1847. For $4,800, Charles Rude built the original 65-foot-tall split stone, whitewashed tower on Hays Point between 1848-1849 about of the steel tower. A new lighthouse was built in 1866, incorporating the light towers and keeper’s dwelling in the same building. The present 62-foot steel tower was erected in 1933, with the light being converted to electricity in 1937. Detailed history includes all aspects of the operation of the station with a great deal on the work and life of the keepers there. Well illustrated with vintage photos. (M). 16.95. 

6641. Wood, Vincent L., PLUM ISLAND RECOLLECTIONS - Views and Reminiscences of Plum Island c.1900 Recounting the Deeds of Capt. Thomas J. Maddock and the Crew of the U. S. Merrimack River Life-Saving Station, Plum Island, Massachusetts. Newburyport . 1995. 81p. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. Whatever your interest, you are sure to enjoy this readable account of every day life at a station of the U. S. Life-Saving Service. This wonderful account of life as Keeper of the Merrimack River Life-Saving Station brings together over 80 never before published vintage photographs made from the family’s archives of glass plate negatives. Taken by Mr. Wood’s grandfather, these negatives provide unusually clear, crisp views which have been faithfully reproduced in a high quality format. Using these views, along with personal notes and family memories, Mr. Wood presents a rare portrait of station life and training in 1910. This interesting account is only available here and is priced unusually low considering the rare accounts and quality photographs, well worth the retail price. A wonderful addition to your library. (M).  $19.95.

2998. Harrison, Timothy E. Lighthouses of Bar Harbor and the Acadia Region. Arcadia. 2009. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. With the exception of Mount Desert Island’s Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse, the lighthouses of Bar Harbor and the Acadia region are among the most remote and lesser-known lighthouses of Maine. As the vessel traffic changed in these areas in the early 1900s, some of these lighthouses were sold into private ownership while others became less important as aids to navigation. Since the structures were located on remote islands or in a highly restricted military installation, the photographs and historical firsthand memories of most of these lighthouses have remained elusive and seemingly lost in the dusty pages of time. Through vintage photographs, Lighthouses of Bar Harbor and the Acadia Region uncovers the history of these structures that kept watch over Maine’s rocky coast. Superb photographs of the stations, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99.

29109. Ostrom, Thomas P. The United States Coast Guard on the Great Lakes - A History. Elderberry Press. 2007. Soft wraps. 223p. The United States Coast Guard traces its origins to 1790, but was not officially named until 1915. At last there is one definitive volume, though a bit crude, describing its history on The Great Lakes from inception to the present. The author, Thomas P. Ostrom, served in the U.S.C.G.R. from 1961-69, and had basic and advanced training at the U.S.C.G. Base, Alameda, California. He served subsequently in the Port Security Reserve Unit in Duluth, Minnesota, and participated in monthly and active duty assignments each summer, earning petty officer rank. Chapters include: A Brief Coast Guard History (1790 to 2006), Predecessors on the Great Lakes (1790-1915), The Coast Guard Emerges (1915-1939), World War II to the Present (1945 to 2006), Station Duluth (1866 to 2006), The U.S.C.G. Reserve and Auxiliary, Aids to Navigation, Great Lakes Light Stations, Great Lakes Ice Breakers, Buoy Tenders on the Lakes, Life Saving, Environmental Protection, Law Enforcement, Port Security, National Defense, and Commerce, An Overview of the Ninth Coast Guard District, Coast Guard Command Leadership, and more. (M). $19.95.

29142. Holmes, Richard. RHODE ISLAND LIGHTHOUSES – A Pictorial History. 2008. 212p. Soft wraps. A complete pictorial guide of the past and present Rhode Island light stations, with vintage photographs, prints and postcard views and a brief history and description of each. With hundreds of illustrations. (M). $24.95.

28454. Patterson, Janice B. Cleveland's Lighthouses. Arcadia. 2009. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Missionary-geographer John Heckewelder was prophetic in the 1790s when he mapped the place where the Cuyahoga River flows into Lake Erie. He wrote, “Cujahaga will hereafter be a place of great importance.” In 1796, surveyors arrived to plot a new town and named it after their superintendent, Moses Cleveland. Soon Cleveland was a magnet for inventors and entrepreneurs. By 1829–1830, a lighthouse was necessary to support lake traffic spurred by shipbuilding, shipping, and population growth. A succession of taller, brighter structures has guided mariners into the Cleveland harbor, creating a splendid history. Remarkable people have tended these sometimes-silent sentinels through decades of calm nights and dramatic storms, subtly contributing to the region’s growth and prosperity. Also included is Cleveland’s Life Saving Service and Coast Guard history, drawing from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the stations, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99.

2946. Chase, Wanton. Boyhood Life at Rose Island [Lighthouse]. Rose Island Beacon. Rose Island Lighthouse Foundation. Number 1. December 2001. 26p. Soft wraps. Wonderful out of print booklet recalling the boyhood life at Rose Island Lighthouse by Wanton Chase, who passed away this past December at 99 years of age. This high gloss page booklet details his memories of life growing up at the lighthouse in the early 1900s. Because he was a “sickly baby” he was sent to live at the Rose Island lighthouse with his grandparents from 1910 to 1918. Wonderful reading. (M). $9.95.

2911. Hudson, Gary J. They Had to Go Out. Xlibris. 2008. 173p. Soft wraps. Gary Hudson knows all too well that he could have been among the five Coast Guard crewmen who drowned during an attempted rescue on a wretched night in January of 1961. Just a week before the tragedy, Hudson had been transferred away from the Coast Guard rescue station at Point Adams near the mouth of the Columbia River. Otherwise, he could have been on one of the three Coast Guard boats attempting to aid a fishing vessel that sank. “They were all my shipmates,” Hudson said of the Coast Guard victims and survivors. “I knew them all.” For several years after the disaster, Hudson drove a rescue boat over the same treacherous waters at the Columbia River bar, and rescued a few boaters himself. He couldn’t stop thinking about his lost comrades. Hudson, 68, who now lives near Toledo, decided to do more than remember - he has now written this book to set the record straight about what happened. “They Had to Go Out” includes a detailed account of the worst loss of life the Coast Guard suffered on the Columbia River in a single incident. The book is heavy on facts about the rescue boats’ strengths — and weaknesses that may have been factors in the deaths. He spent four years interviewing survivors and going through the official records from the sinking. All this, and the many photos included, makes “They Had to Go Out” a fascinating read. (M). 19.99. 

2984. Metzer, Patty. Keeper of the Light. Focus Pub., Bemidji. 1997. 2nd. 368p. Soft wraps. Colin McRae seems to have found his life's fulfillment in his position as keeper at Highland Lighthouse in North Truro on Cape Cod. His life changes when he must travel into Provincetown to find a housekeeper and companion for his ailing sister. The only person available is a young, mysterious girl who is thought of as the town 'dummy' because she is mute. Life at Highland Light would never be the same. A story with strong characterization, unpredictable plot and an intriguing 1797 Cape Cod setting. Readers will not be disappointed. (M). $12.95. 

2097. Egan, Leona Rust. PROVINCETOWN AS A STAGE. Parnassus, Orleans. 1994. 296p. DJ. In 1916 this remote fishing village extending 25 miles into the Atlantic was teeming with unprecedented numbers of tourists; there were battleships from Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet in the harbor, and a significant segment of Greenwich Village’s Avant-Garde was there. By all contemporary accounts, never before in America had so many people who wrote, painted, or acted been thrown together in one small place. Of great significance to American theatre was a young struggling playwright named Eugene O’Neill, who settled in the old Peaked Hill Bars Life-Saving Station, where he remained for nine years that was to culminate in a Nobel Prize. O’Neil’s life in Provincetown, in the station and his career are the focus of this interesting book. (M).                                                                                                                                                             $14.95.

2936. Halperin, James L. and Gregory J. Rohan. The Collector’s Handbook – Tax Planning, Strategy, and Estate Advise from Collectibles Experts for Collectors and their Heirs. Dallas. 2008. 4th. 120p. Soft wraps. The Collector’s Handbook is a step-by-step guide to tax and estate planning for collectors. From record keeping to disposition methods, this handy primer cuts right to the chase on every topic. It is mostly written to the active collector, but pertinent chapters also have “Tips for Heirs” sections to aid non-collectors in avoiding common pitfalls when inheriting a collection (and once you've read this book, its convenient size makes it perfect for inclusion alongside your collection in a bank vault or safe deposit box). Whatever your motivations in collecting, this book will help make you a more intelligent collector. Nearly every collection involves making reasonable financial decisions; doing so repeatedly will improve the monetary value you or your heirs ultimately reap from your collecting endeavors, as well as increase your satisfaction. Making your hobby more productive and rewarding is easiest done while you are actively pursuing these pieces of history. This booklet is written by three owners of Heritage Coin, the world’s largest and most respected rare coin dealer and auctioneer, and offers sound advice and the experience gained from billions of dollars in collectible transactions over four decades. Chapters include record keeping, caring for your collection, safeguarding your collection, tax options for estate planning, charitable giving, art attribution and authentication, having your collection appraised, selling your collection, insurance companies offering collectible coverage, and more. A wealth of sound and practical information, written in a clear and concise manner. Must reading for every serious collector! (M). $16.95.

      

2908.  Hanable, William S. Lighthouses and Lifesaving on Washington's Outer Coast. Arcadia. 2008. 128p. Soft wraps. 180 vintage photographs. Washington’s storm-ridden outer coast stretches from Cape Disappointment, at the mouth of the Columbia River, to Cape Flattery, at the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a distance of about 150 miles. Historians have labeled these waters “the Graveyard of the Pacific” and “the Unforgiving Coast.” Despite their hazards, sea routes to, from, and along the coast have been busy. Maritime fur traders and explorers, warships, Gold Rush shipping, passenger vessels, lumber carriers, break-bulk freighters, container ships, and tankers have plied these waters. Concurrently, fisheries developed along the coast, adding to the number of vessels at risk. To assist mariners sailing these waters, the United States built its first lighthouse on the Washington coast at Cape Disappointment in 1856. Additional lighthouses, lightships, and lifesaving stations soon followed. With more than 180 images from archives throughout the Pacific Northwest, this collection documents their history. This interesting volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $21.99.

2907. Barnette, Michael. Florida's Shipwrecks. Arcadia. 2008. 128p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. The Sunshine State has a rich maritime history spanning more than five centuries. Tragically, part of that history includes thousands of ships that have met their fates in Florida waters. Potentially more than 5,000 shipwrecks reside off Florida’s 1,200 miles of coastline, with hundreds more lost in the state’s interior rivers. In and of itself, the Florida Keys archipelago, consisting of approximately 1,700 islands stretching 200 miles, is littered with the remains of close to 1,000 shipwrecks. In fact, many features of the Florida Keys were named after various shipwreck events, such as Fowey Rocks, which earned its name after the 1748 wrecking of the British warship HMS Fowey, and Alligator Reef, where the schooner USS Alligator met her demise in 1822. Florida’s Shipwrecks utilizes captivating images to illustrate dramatic stories of danger and peril at sea, introducing readers to a fascinating cross-section of Florida’s shipwreck history. This interesting volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28452. Terras, Donald J. Lighthouses of Chicago Harbor – Their History, Architecture and Lore. Evanston. 2006. 96p. Soft wraps. Since 1831 Chicago’s harbor has been home to a succession of lighthouses to grant safe access to one of the great historical port cities of the country. This beautifully illustrated book tells the story of the structures, the keepers, and the role that they played in Chicago’s development. Wonderfully illustrated with numerous vintage images, many beautifully reproduced in full page views. One of the first that you will encounter as you thumb through the pages is a full page color image of an 1848 Pleasonton map of Great Lakes lighthouses – a spectacular map by this early overseer of lighthouse construction in the United States. Other rare views include many keeper photos, lamps and equipment and much more. Well worth the price for these images alone. (M). $19.95.

28426. Steinberg, Maurice “Moe” RM 3/c. A Sailor at War: On the Greenland Patrol - WWII.  Xlibris. 2002. 178p. Soft wraps. A wonderful memoir of Radioman 3/c Maurice Steinberg’s experiences of World War II – from boot camp, to becoming a Morse Code radio operator on board a 240-foot Coast Guard convoy escort, and anti-submarine duto in the North Atlantic. U-boats remained a constant threat as his vessel patrolled the North Atlantic routes. This is part of the story of the Greenland Patrol, and life aboard a Coast Guard vessel. Wonderfully written in a down-to-earth style that every veteran and civilian alike will appreciate. (M). $24.95.

28418. Patten, Juliana Fern. Another Side of World War II: A Coast Guard Lieutenant in the South Pacific. Shippensburg. 2006. 156p. Autographed by the author. Another Side Of World War II is the engaging personal story of one man's experiences of World War II in the South Pacific Theatre. Coast Guard Lieutenant Jules Fern’s letters, spanning two years at sea in the South Pacific, offer a poignant view of life aboard ship during World War II. Compiled from his letters, logs, and photographs of the time, this account penned by his daughter after his death, provides readers with an intimate and vivid detailing of events from the perspective of someone deeply involved with the progression of the war. A welcome contribution to the growing library of World War II military memoirs an and biographies, Another Side Of World War II is very highly recommended to all readers with an interest in first-hand accounts, as well as those in search of a better understanding of World War II and America's participation in the South Pacific combat zones. Well illustrated with his photos taken at the time, orders, messages and more. (M). 16.95.

  

28359. Rogerson, Bruce et al. Point Cabrillo Light Station. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. Point Cabrillo Lighthouse, on the rugged coast of Mendocino County in Northern California, was first lit as an aid to navigation on June 10, 1909. The light station continues to serve mariners and is regarded as one of the crown jewels of lighthouses on the West Coast. In July 1850, just north of the future site of the lighthouse, the clipper brig Frolic wrecked in its journey from China to Gold Rush–era San Francisco. European settlers in search of salvage from the cargo found instead Mendocino’s vast strands of virgin redwood timber stretching inland from the coast. Getting this valuable lumber to market in the mid-19th century required ships, and ships needed lighthouses to guide them. In 1909, the light known today as Point Cabrillo was built on a windswept promontory two miles north of the village of Mendocino. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the station, keepers, equipment  and more, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28367. Semones, JoAnn. Shipwrecks, Scalawags, And Scavengers -  The Storied Waters Of Pigeon Point. Glencannon Press. 2007. 160p. DJ. Over 70 photos and illustrations. Pigeon Point - Those lucky enough to survive the bloodiest of shipwrecks at Pigeon Point say the San Juan, an old steamer, was doomed from the moment it collided with an oil tanker just before midnight on Aug. 29, 1929. "We heard the crash and the lights went out," said the San Juan's second officer. "Then, in a second, I got covered with water and the vessel sank from under me." Fifty-five passengers and 20 crewmen perished in the fog as the waves overtook the splintered steamer. Just one child survived the wreck as his mother threw him onto the deck of the oil tanker, itself damaged from the collision. Such tales haunt the pages of "Shipwrecks, Scalawags, and Scavengers: The Storied Waters of Pigeon Point." Between 1853 and 1953, ships of all types – clipper ships, barks, schooners, steamers — sailing the central California Coast fell victim to Pigeon Point’s unpredictable weather and rocky shoreline. Author and historian JoAnn Semones offers the first- ever history of shipwrecks at San Mateo County's notoriously treacherous Pigeon Point, using rare photographs and historic accounts from the people whose lives were altered by their experiences there. (M). $24.95. 

28261. Harrison, Timothy. Lighthouses of the Sunrise County. Foghorn Publishing. 2008. 189p. Soft wraps. The most complete photographic book ever published about the eleven lighthouses where the rays of the sun first touch the coast of the United States of America - Maine's Washington County. This detailed work by noted lighthouse historian and writer Tim Harrison utilizes hundreds of early photographs to detail the lives of the keepers of the lighthouses at some of Maine's most pictures and remote light stations from the days of the U.S. Lighthouse Service to the days of U.S Coast Guard and then to the present. Superb accounts by keeper and their families and descendents make this a most interesting read. Includes many early, rare photos, memories and storied about the keepers and their families, their pets, work and improvements to the station over the years, and much more. Includes an entire chapter on Connie Small, the "First Lady of Light."  Light stations include Avery Rock, Libby Island, Little River, Lubec Channel, Moose Peak, Narraguagus, Nash Island, Petit Manan, St. Croix River, West Quoddy Head and Whitlock's Mill. Great reading, well worth the price for the images alone! (M). $18.95. 

28319. Peterson, Harold L., THE AMERICAN SWORD 1775 – 1945  – A survey of the Swords Worn by the Uniformed Forces of the United States from the Revolution to the close of World War II. Dover. 2003. Soft wraps. A complete classification and description of all the major types of swords worn by the armed forces of the United States , the Revenue Cutter Service the Public Health Service, cadets, diplomat. Includes a directory of 400 American sword makers, the evolution of scabbards, sword nomenclature, silver hilted and presentation swords, and a complete classification and description of all of the major types of swords worn by the services, dealers and inspectors. Enhanced with more than 400 illustrations of swords from rare documents, plus much more. Includes 186 halftones of swords, b/w plates and drawings. Original blue cloth with silver stamping and vignette on front cover. An excellent reference. (M).  Please inquire for pricing.

28365. Shaw, David W. The Sea Shall Embrace Them - The Tragic Story of the Steamship Arctic. Free Press. 2002. DJ. 241p. The 1854 collision at sea between the American ship Arctic and the Vesta, a much smaller French steamship, set in motion one of the most harrowing events in maritime history. David W. Shaw has based this fascinating account on the firsthand testimony of the few who survived the wreck, including the Arctic's heroic captain, James C. Luce, who was forced to fight his mutinous crew as they took the lifeboats and left hundreds of passengers to suffer a cruel and painful death. Not only did 400 people -- including Luce's own frail son -- die by daybreak, but the wreck also ended the domination of the seas by the American maritime fleet for the rest of the nineteenth century. Utterly compelling, The Sea Shall Embrace Them is a stirring slice of heretofore little-known American history. Beautifully written, it puts the reader on deck as a ship full of men, women, and children do battle both with a mighty ocean and with their own baser instincts. (M). Published at $24.95. Our price $22.95.

28375. Hodgkins, John. A Soldier's Son: An American Boyhood during World War II. Down East Books. 2006. 325p. Soft wraps. John Hodgkins was eight years old when his father was drafted into the army and left for Europe to fight in World War II. After his return, John's father never spoke much about the war, but John knew he'd kept a diary. After his father's death, John opened his diary and two boxes of memorabilia. What began as John's attempt to tell his father's story became the story of his own life. This memoir recounts what life was like on the home front of Temple, Maine, during the war -- as well as what life was like on the front lines, thanks to what John learned from his father's letters home and his war diary. It also provides a firsthand look at the hardscrabble lives of rural Mainers and a way of living that is now mostly gone. (M). $16.95.

8298. Bachelder, Peter Dow and Mason Philip Smith. FOUR SHORT BLASTS – The Gale of 1898 and the Loss of the Steamer Portland . 1998. 138p. Soft wraps. Cleanly written, this interesting account details the mysterious disappearance of the state of the art steamer, S.S. Portland, in November of 1898.  Since there were no survivors, sources are newspaper articles of the day and interviews with survivors of the gale in other craft. The authors provide details of the storm itself, the tragic foundering of the Portland , the storm's effect ashore, the official investigation of the sinking and ongoing legends which exist to this day. Illustrations and photographs are plentiful and poignant. In addition to a helpful index and bibliography, the authors have provided appendices—lists of victims as well as vessels lost or damaged in the gale, an amazing 3000 or more schooners, yachts, steamers and barges between New Jersey and Nova Scotia. Although the loss of the steamer and 140 passengers and crew is the primary subject, Four Short Blasts contains fascinating tangential stories, about the U. S. Life-Saving Service (long defunct) which at the time of the storm had 13 stations along the shore of Cape Cod . $17.95. 

28240. Buker, Commander George E., THE METAL LIFE CAR- The Inventor, the Impostor, and the Business of Lifesaving. University of Alabama Press. 2008. DJ. 224p, 17 illustrations. This title presents the fascinating story of American ingenuity and its struggle against bureaucracy and chicanery. For centuries sailing vessels crept along the coastline, ready to flee ashore in case of danger or trouble; this worked well until weather or poor sailing drove these ships against an unforgiving coast. Joseph Francis, born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1801, was an inventor who also had the ability to organize a business to produce his inventions and the salesmanship to sell his products. His metal lifeboats, first used in survey expeditions in Asia Minor and Central America, came into demand among the world's merchant marine, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Revenue Service. His corrugated "life car" would become an important tool of the U.S. Life-Saving Service. The metal boats also played an important role in the Third Seminole War in Florida. Francis' metal pontoon army wagons served in the trans-Mississippi campaigns against the Indians. In Europe, he was acclaimed as a genius and sold patent rights to shipyards in Liverpool and the Woolwich Arsenal in England, Le Havre seaport in France, in the free city of Hamburg, and in the Russian Empire. But while Francis was busy in Europe, Captain Douglass Ottinger, U.S. Revenue Marine Service, claimed to be the inventor of Francis' life car and obtained support in the U.S. Congress and the Patent Office for his claim. Francis had to battle for decades to prove his rights, and Americans remained generally unfamiliar with his devices, thereby condemning Civil War armies to inferior copies while Europe was using, and acclaiming, his inventions. Long awaited account of the work of this important life-saving equipment inventor. (M). $29.95.

28308. Ellsberg, Commander Edward. On the Bottom. Flat Hammock Press. 2004. 256 pages w/ photos, with added CD, & DVD. With an introduction by Edward L. Beach, Captain, U. S. Navy (Retired). First published in 1929, this enthralling work has become one of the greatest true stories of adventure, dogged determination, courage and loyalty ever written. On the evening of September 25, 1925 the U.S. Navy Submarine S-51 was rammed by the steamship SS City of Rome in open seas off Block Island, Rhode Island, and sank in 132 feet of water, with the loss of 33 lives. This disaster evoked such a storm of popular indignation against the Navy Department that something had to be done. It was felt that at all costs a determined attempt must be made to raise the S-51, if only to restore public confidence. No vessel had ever been raised from such a depth, and to the technical mind the thing was impossible. The task of salvaging the submarine fell to Lieutenant Commander Edward Ellsberg and a group of naval divers scavenged from all over the fleet. It was done painstakingly over a nine month period and involved obstacle after obstacle, all the while battling rough seas, icy waters, and "the bends." Working in hard hats with lead boots, in minimal light, while dragging air lines behind them, each diver had about an hour of exhausting and terrifying work before a lengthy decompression process. It is no exaggeration to say that the impossible was achieved. Originally published in 1929, this magnificent account of the struggle on the ocean floor to salvage the sunken U.S. Navy submarine, S-51, has become a modern classic of the sea. What was not included in Edward Ellsberg’s gripping account are specifics of the accident, the aftermath, and the extent that the event touched the nation. This expanded edition presents this and more by including an introduction, a publisher’s preface, additional photographs, an afterword, and appendixes. Also added is a recording of the period song "Sinking of the Submarine S-51," an oral history by Commander Ellsberg, and a video disc of rare on scene newsreel footage. "A marvelous tale, filled with moments of horrified expectancy, of glad thrills, of impossible deeds and endurances, of achievements that smack of magic." (The New York Times). (M). $34.95

Due in soon:

28129. Galluzzo, John. Lifesavers of the South Shore – A History of Rescue and Loss. History Press. 2008. DJ. 128p. However cruelly the rocks of Massachusetts 's South Shore have treated storm-driven sailors, there can be no questioning the selflessness and courage of the keepers and surfmen who played host to the no man's land between frozen beach and gale-tossed sea. Read John Galluzzo's enthralling account of the Life-Saving Service and meet legends like Joshua James, whose surfboat, Nantasket, once saved twenty-nine men from six boats in a grueling thirty-six hours. Chart a course through the service's history, from its humble beginning in the refuge huts built after the American Revolution until its absorption into the U.S. Coast Guard in the twentieth century. (M). $19.99.

28300. DeWire, Elinore. LIGHTHOUSES OF THE SOUTH – Your Guide to the Lighthouses of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Stillwater . 2004. 160 p. DJ. A Pictorial Discovery Guide. A fresh look at the history and technological evolution of lighthouses in the area, the development of apparatus, architecture, construction and maintenance on their remote sites, the daily life of the keepers and much more. The author presents an exciting history illustrated with stunning photographs, historical anecdotes, architectural details and local legends. Lavishly illustrated, an excellent text on the subject and guide for the area. (M). Published at $29.95. Our Price $21.95.

28310. Ransom, Candice. Rescue on the Outer Banks. Millbrook Press. 2002. 48p. Soft wraps. Illustrated by Karen Ritz. Superb and artwork introduces young readers to Life Saving Service history through this fictionalized story based on the exploits of the Pea Island Lifesavers. On October 11, 1896, ten-year-old Sam Deal and his horse, Ginger, watch as the brave surfmen of Pea Island struggle to save the lives of nine people stranded on a shipwreck. Sam has dreamt of becoming a surfman just like the all-African-American crew, and this is his chance. Can he and Ginger help the crew rescue the victims, or will they be lost forever? Written in a story format, this account relates events that really happened, followed by a brief summary of the historical event to further explain the significance it had on history. Wonderful for your children, and for yourself just for the illustrations. (M). $14.95.

Nominated for the 2008 Foundation for Coast Guard History book award:

27268. Claflin, James W. HISTORIC NANTUCKET: SURFSIDE LIFE-SAVING STATION - A History of Nantucket’s Life-Saving Stations. Volume I. Worcester. 2007. 79 p. Soft wraps. Special edition, signed and numbered of 500, includes pasted in wood chip from Surfside Life-Saving Station. Historic Nantucket: Surfside Life-Saving Station is one of a continuing series of booklets that tell the story of historic lighthouses, lightships and life-saving stations along the New England Coast . The Nantucket coastline has long been one of the most dangerous areas along the New England coast. Over the years four life-saving stations and eight Massachusetts Humane Society stations stood guard over the island’s shores, standing ready to combat the seas in an effort to rescue shipwrecked mariners in their time of need. With thousands of vessels plying the dangerous waters, the chance of a shipping disaster was always great. Hundreds of shipwrecks did indeed occur off the coast with startling losses. Using descriptive text and a variety of vintage images from private as well as museum collections, we get a rare glimpse into the history of the area and the lives of these dedicated government men and women. Author James Claflin combines an extensively researched text with his exquisite collection of vintage photographs, many previously unpublished, to tell the story of this important piece of history. (M). $8.95.

28198. Groot, E. P., The United States Life-Saving Service in Ocean County. Excerpts From Annual Reports of the United States Life Saving Service for the Fiscal Years Ending June 30,  1876-1914. Ocean County Historical Society. 2005. 368p. Stiff wraps. This is a carefully prepared and attractively presented narrative of the Life-Saving Service in Ocean County from 1876 to 1914. After witnessing a shipwreck on the coast of Long Beach Island and the loss of all thirteen lives in 1839, W. A. Newell was prompted as a Congressman in 1848 to appeal for funds to establish a federal life-saving system.  This book tells the story of that system, its function, and activities at Ocean County’s eight life saving stations. Included are numerous accounts of wrecks and rescue efforts taken from original reposts and other sources, as well as extensive statistical information on maritime accidents and developments in life-saving technique.  The book contains extensive notes on the U.S. Life Saving Service, locations and manning of stations, activities and narratives of life saving crews, tabular summaries of maritime accidents, an index of vessel names, and various maps and pictures. Excellent reference and reading. Rare. (M). $88.

28169. Thurlow, Sandra Henderson and Deanna Wintercorn. GILBERT’S BAR HOUSE OF REFUGE – Home of History. Stuart. 2008. 96p. Soft wraps. The Houses of Refuge in Florida were a series of stations operated by the United States Life Saving Service along the coast of Florida to rescue and shelter ship-wrecked sailors. Five houses were built on the east coast in 1876, with five more added in 1885. There was also two Life Saving Stations built, one just south of the Jupiter Inlet, the other on the Gulf coast on Santa Rosa Island near Pensacola. The houses were manned by civilian keepers, contractors who lived in the houses with their families. Most of these houses remained in service as life-saving stations until 1915 or later. Some of the locations became United States Coast Guard stations after the Life Saving Service was merged into the Coast Guard in 1915.Today, only one remains – Gilbert’s Bar. This rare and wonderful account of the life and work at these lonely outposts is long overdue. (M). $16.95.

28238. Bathurst, Bella. The Wreckers – A Story of Killing Seas and Plundered Shipwreck, from the Eighteenth Century to the Present Day. Boston. 2005. 326p. DJ. Bella Bathurst's first book, the acclaimed The Lighthouse Stevensons, told the story of Scottish lighthouse construction by the ancestors of Robert Louis Stevenson. Now she returns to the sea to search out the darker side of those lights, detailing the secret history of shipwrecks and the predatory scavengers who live off the spoils. Even today, Britain's coastline remains a dangerous place. An island soaked by four separate seas, with shifting sand banks to the east, veiled reefs to the west, powerful currents above, and the world's busiest shipping channel below, the country's offshore waters are strewn with shipwrecks. For villagers scratching out an existence along Britain's shores, those wrecks have been more than simply an act of God; in many cases, they have been the difference between living well and just getting by. Some plunderers were held to be so skilled that they could strip a ship from stem to stern before the Coast Guard had even left port, some were rumored to lure ships onto the rocks with false lights, and some simply waited for winter gales to do their work. From all around Britain, Bathurst has uncovered the hidden history of ships and shipwreck victims, from shoreline orgies so Dionysian that few participants survived the morning to humble homes fitted with silver candelabra, to coastlines rigged like stage sets to villages where everyone owns identical tennis shoes. Spanning three hundred years of history, The Wreckers examines the myths, the realities, and the superstitions of shipwrecks and uncovers the darker side of life on Britain's shores. (M). Published at $25. Our Price $16.95.

       

28192. Raffield, John C. UNITED STATES COAST GUARD STATION ~ PANAMA CITY -  A Seventy Two Year History 1933-2005. Jacksonville. 2005. 111p. Soft wraps. United States Coast Guard Station ~ Panama City, A Seventy Two Year History," was the first and only documented Coast Guard history for Panama City and Bay County since the United States Coast Guard’s arrival in 1933. The station featured nine C.G. Cutters, four C.G. manned Lighthouses, and WW II Coastal Defense Gun Emplacements at the Pass, K-9 and mounted beach patrols, and the forty LSTs that conducted their two-week shakedown exercises in the Gulf, and anchored in St. Andrews Bay for ‘safe harbor’ at night to escape the German U-boats activity in the Gulf. Growing up in Panama City, the author had both direct and indirect relationship with the Coast Guard crews, CG Auxiliary personnel, and retirees. Over the years, Coast Guard retirees have made Panama City their new home, and made boating at one level or another, their business. The author has always had a fondness for the beaches, water, boats, and has felt a friendship with the Coast Guard as his dad had throughout WW II as a member of the CG Auxiliary, and having lived in the old Coast Guard Headquarters ~ barracks as a child. In this privately published work, the author presents a detailed history of Coast Guard Station – Panama City including the men and facilities, history of cutters assigned there over the years, harbor defenses and beach patrols, lighthouses in the area, LSTs and World War II activities, and more. Thoroughly illustrated with photographs. (M). $58.

28202. Raffield, John C. BIRTH PLACES OF U.S. COAST GUARD CUTTERS, SMALL BOATS, AND STATIONS – PANAMA CITY, FL. - A Seventy Four Year History 1933-2007. Jacksonville. 2007. 292p. Soft wraps. Birth Places Of U.S. Coast Guard Cutters evolved as an additional detailed Coast Guard history – a companion to the author’s earlier work United States Coast Guard Station ~ Panama City. In this work he includes additional CG Cutters, bringing the total U.S. Coast Guard Cutters to eleven being homeported in Panama City. Through the years, there have been four different Station locations, and the eleven cutters, four small boats, and four aids to navigation boats making their berths in seven different locations in St. Andrews Bay. The author felt the need to complete a more in depth look into the cutters and boats. The author felt that the new historical information and photos needed to be documented before all the existing personal historical resources “Cross The Bar,” resulting in their accounts of local Coast Guard history being lost to Station-Panama City, Panama City, and Bay County. Growing up in Panama City, the author had both direct and indirect relationship with the Coast Guard crews, CG Auxiliary personnel, and retirees. Over the years, Coast Guard retirees have made Panama City their new home, and made boating at one level or another, their business. The author has always had a fondness for the beaches, water, boats, and has felt a friendship with the Coast Guard as his dad had throughout WW II as a member of the CG Auxiliary, and having lived in the old Coast Guard Headquarters ~ barracks as a child. In this privately published work, the author presents a detailed history of the vessels of U.S. Coast Guard Station – Panama City. Thoroughly illustrated with photographs. (M). $68.

28196. Hill, Peter. Stargazing. Knopf. 2004. 275p. DJ. When Peter Hill, a student at Dundee College of Art, answered an advertisement seeking relief lighthouse keepers, little did he imagine that within a month he would be living with three men he didn't know in a lighthouse on Pladda, a small remote island off the west coast of Scotland . The year was 1973, Hill was nineteen, and he was to spend the next six months in various lighthouses, "keeping" with all manner of unusual and fascinating people. The resulting book is a charming and beautifully written memoir that is not only a heartfelt lament for Hill's own youth and innocence but also for a simpler and more honest age, for the life of the keepers kept awake by the spray and the cold wind, and mush more. (VG+). Published at $29.95. Our Price $14.95.

   

28209. Morris, Patricia. Georgia's Lighthouses. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. When British general James Oglethorpe landed on Georgia ’s coast in 1733, he realized that the success of his new colony, Savannah , depended largely on its establishment and development as a commercial port. Only three years later, in 1736, the first lighthouse was built on Tybee Island . Beginning there at the mouth of the Savannah River , this volume travels down the coast, telling the very different stories of the Cockspur Light, Sapelo Light, St. Simons Light, and Cumberland Light, which is now located on a private island. Rich in history, these lighthouses help to define the story of Georgia ’s 100-mile coastline. Of the lighthouses built, only five remain today; two are operational lights— Tybee Island and St. Simons Island . Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28210. Grand Traverse Lighthouse Museum.  Grand Traverse Lighthouse. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. The Grand Traverse Lighthouse sits majestically at the entrance of Grand Traverse Bay , guiding vessels between Chicago and the Straits of Mackinac. For over 150 years, it has been an important beacon for all who have plied the waters of Lake Michigan . The original 1852 lighthouse was used for six years before being torn down. In 1858, a larger lighthouse with an attached nine-sided tower was erected on a site farther west. Over the course of its history, 66 lighthouse keepers, assistant keepers, and U.S. Coast Guard personnel have maintained the light. Today visitors tour the restored lighthouse, which is now a living museum filled with displays and exhibits depicting a simpler way of life. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

  

28211. Fahlen, Kim and Karen Scanlon. Lighthouses of San Diego. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. As his ship rounded the high point off Point Loma, San Diego , in 1859, Richard Henry Dana wrote, “We were greeted by the cheering presence of a light-house.” In reality, beams from San Diego ’s first lighthouse were repeatedly lost in cloud and fog, and all too soon came agitation for a more effective light at a lower elevation. By 1891, two new lighthouses were constructed to achieve what one could not—a major light on the low tip of Point Loma and a secondary light at Ballast Point. Although abandonment of the first lighthouse structure was nearly catastrophic, it still survives today to charm millions of visitors. Now, and long overdue, are new glimpses of the famous and lesser-known lighthouses of San Diego thanks to the memories and photographs belonging to families of the men who kept the lights burning. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28212. Fahlen, Kim and Karen Scanlon. Lighthouses of San Diego. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 15 p. Soft wraps. San Diego ’s first lighthouse on top of Point Loma was replaced by 1891 with two others, at the base of the cliff and on Ballast Point, where their beams were less affected by fog and low clouds. In this collection of vintage-photograph postcards, the authors explore these historic beacons’ pasts. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb views, well worth it. (M). $7.99.

  

28213. Veronico, Betty S. Lighthouses of the Bay Area. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. The 1848 discovery of gold in the hills of California brought prospectors and adventurers west; many came across the country on the treacherous western trails, while others came by sea. The rugged coast of California and the dangers of the San Francisco Bay waters claimed many ships and their passengers. The loss of these ships and the ever-increasing number of vessels converging in the San Francisco Bay made it evident that navigational aids were desperately needed. To enhance maritime safety in the region, the San Francisco Bay ’s first light, located on Alcatraz Island , began construction in 1852. Light stations soon followed at Fort Point, Point Bonita, and the Farallon Islands . An additional 15 lights later served the bay, and two lightships were stationed outside the Golden Gate . Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $21.99. 

28214. Veronico, Betty S. Lighthouses of the Bay Area. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 15 p. Soft wraps. The San Francisco Bay ’s first light, on Alcatraz Island , began construction in 1852. Light stations soon followed at Fort Point, Point Bonita, and the Farallon Islands . An additional 15 lights later served the bay, and a lightship was stationed outside the Golden Gate . In this collection of vintage-photograph postcards, the authors explore these historic beacons’ pasts. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb views, well worth it. (M). $7.99. Due out in August.

     

28215. Taylor, Cathy. Maryland's Lighthouses. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. In Colonial times, as the Chesapeake Bay and larger rivers became vital shipping channels, the need arose to mark Maryland ’s dangerous shoals and waterways. Lighthouses sprang up throughout the 1800s and early 1900s, including wood-framed cottages placed upon screw pile foundations that stood offshore in the unforgiving waters. Most of these unique structures did not survive, lost tragically to ice that also occasionally claimed the lives of the keepers who faithfully tended them and rescued mariners in trouble. With the advent of electricity and GPS, many beacons succumbed to vandalism and neglect, leaving a fraction remaining. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28216. Clary, Margie Willis and Kim McDermott. South Carolina Lighthouses. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. Boasting one of the oldest lighthouses in North America and the most working lighthouses today, South Carolina has a long seafaring history. In 1767, the Morris Island Lighthouse was built at the entrance to Charleston Harbor , and before 1860, there were lighthouses in Georgetown , Cape Romain , Bull’s Bay, and Hunting Island . During the Civil War, all lighthouses on the eastern coast were darkened. Many were destroyed. After the war, towers that had been damaged were repaired, and additional lights were erected on Daufuskie and Hilton Head Islands . In 1962, the new Charleston Light on Sullivan’s Island replaced the Morris Island Lighthouse, which was suffering from erosion by the ever-encroaching sea. The new light contained an elevator and two rotating beacons capable of producing 28 million candlepower, a light that can be seen 26 miles out to sea. At that time, it was considered one of the most powerful lights in the Western Hemisphere . Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

28217. Clary, Margie Willis and Kim McDermott. South Carolina Lighthouses. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 15 p. Soft wraps. With one of the oldest lighthouses in the country and the most working lighthouses today, South Carolina boasts a rich lighthouse history. In this collection of vintage-photograph postcards, the authors explore these historic beacons’ pasts. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb views, well worth it. (M). $7.99.

28218. Author(s): The Air Station Elizabeth City Wardroom. Coast Guard Base Elizabeth City. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. Situated on the northern end of North Carolina ’s Outer Banks, Elizabeth City has a strong aviation tradition. The Wright brothers used the “ Harbor of Hospitality ” as a final way station before traveling on to Kitty Hawk . This coastal town has been the center of United States Coast Guard Aviation since the establishment of the only Coast Guard–owned airport in 1939. Coast Guard Base Elizabeth City began as an installation of six seaplanes operating off of the Pasquotank River . During World War II, the population ballooned to 8,000 assigned personnel. Post-war USCG Aviation expansion saw the addition of many maintenance functions that led to the creation of the Aviation Repair and Supply Base, the center of USCG Aviation maintenance. The base was expanded with a separate air station, the Aviation Technical Training Center , CG Aviation’s schoolhouse, Support Center Elizabeth City , and Small Boat Station Elizabeth City . The mission of providing the finest aviation maintenance to Coast Guard Aviation and the highest level of service to mariners of the Virginia Capes and Outer Banks remains an integral part of the installation. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99. Due out in September.

 

28155. Campbell, Lyall. Sable Island Shipwrecks - Disaster and Survival at the North Atlantic Graveyard. Nimbus. 1994. 200p. Illustrated. More than 500 ships have gone aground in this "graveyard of the Atlantic" since 1583 when one of Sir Humphrey Gilbert's ships, the "Delight", went down. Campbell has studied the marine disasters around Sable Island and tells many of their stories. This best-selling book tells of disaster, danger, rescue, and survival, and the people who provided care and safe haven for those unlucky enough to be shipwrecked in the Graveyard of the North Atlantic. $17.95.

28162. Floca, Brian. LIGHTSHIP. New York. 2007. 40p. DJ. This is a truly beautiful picture book about a subject most young readers may never have encountered. Author-illustrator Floca, in brisk but poetic words and stunning watercolors that are both witty and informative, tells the story of the red-hulled Ambrose Light. Young adventurers are sure to be drawn into the life of the crew and its cat, as the ship weathers fog, storms, and close encounters with other vessels, while all the time she "holds her one sure spot." From the shining lights high on the masts to the domain of the engineer deep in the hull, Floca's research lets readers explore the equipment of a lightship and the perils of the sea. Though each picture deserves attention, especially striking are the ones of the scarlet hull in a snowstorm (through portholes, cat and cook are seen snug below) and of the huge black shape of the S.S. Ardizzone (a tribute to the English illustrator) looming over the Ambrose as a crewman shouts his warning. (M). $19.95.

27302. Powers, Dennis M. SENTINEL OF THE SEAS – Life and Death at the Most Dangerous Lighthouse Ever Built. Citadel Press. 2007. 380p. DJ. Miles off the coast of northern California lies a mariner’s nightmare. Concealed by roiling sea and thick fog, the jagged edges of a submerged volcanic mountain chain await approaching vessels like predators in the mist. This is one of the most hazardous reefs off the West Coast. And for over a century, it has been home to the most remote, most expensive, and most dangerous lighthouse ever built in America. In Sentinel of the Seas, Dennis M. Powers chronicles the heroic stories of men and women who have gone where land and sea collide. To build the St. George Reef Lighthouse, Alexander Ballantyne—probably the only man alive who was qualified and brave enough to supervise such a project—faced incredible hurdles, including the haul of six-ton granite blocks onto a spit of washed-over land from a quarry seventy-five miles away. In 1937 George Roux, the tough, longtime head lighthouse keeper, was trapped for two months by howling winds and stories-high waves with his crew on the verge of mutiny. In 1951 a rogue wave capsized a Coast Guard launch being lowered from the lighthouse, challenging keeper Fred Permenter to attempt a nearly impossible rescue that would win him a place in Coast Guard history. Based on five years of research drawing on the National Archives, original journals, and personal interviews, Sentinel of the Seas is the first book to capture the tumultuous history of this astounding engineering feat and the lives that have been influenced by it. (M). $21.95.

 

2873. na. H. K. CUMMINGS REVISITED, 1887-1905. Vol. I. Intro. by Henry Scammell. Bobi Eldridge (Coordinator). Snow Library. Orleans. 2004. 35p. Soft wraps. Superbly reproduced images from the collection of 750 glass plate photographs taken by H. K. Cummings at the turn of the previous century. Henry Knowles Cummings, born in the last year of the Civil War, discovered the fascination of photography the years from 1885 to 1905. His photos bore images of the town as it then was, streets and buildings, horses and rigs, and people and dogs. Other plates held images made by the ever present sea. He pointed his camera everywhere, at the treeless moors of the Outer Cape, at the wooden sailing ships storm-smashed against the shore, at the crews of life-saving stations. That was H. K. Cummings pursuing his avocation, as two or three of his Orleans contemporaries did. On the counter of his dry good store on Main Street, he kept a pile of prints from his negatives, which he sold for 25 cents each. By the time of his death in the 1950s, at 87, Cummings the photographer had amassed about 1,000 views of Orleans scenes and people. His plates and some of his prints are preserved now at the Snow Library, a valuable record in the history of the town. Volume I contains thirty three impressions including Chatham Twin Lights, the wreck of the Kate Harding (December 1892), Orleans Life-Saving crew, town views and much more. A joy to peruse through, beautifully done. (M). $17.95. 

2874. na. H. K. CUMMINGS REVISITED, 1887-1905. Vol. II: Working. Intro. by Henry Scammell. Bobi Eldridge (Coordinator). Snow Library. Orleans. 2006. 35p. Soft wraps. Superbly reproduced images from the collection of 750 glass plate photographs taken by H. K. Cummings at the turn of the previous century. Henry Knowles Cummings, born in the last year of the Civil War, discovered the fascination of photography the years from 1885 to 1905. His photos bore images of the town as it then was, streets and buildings, horses and rigs, and people and dogs. Other plates held images made by the ever present sea. He pointed his camera everywhere, at the treeless moors of the Outer Cape, at the wooden sailing ships storm-smashed against the shore, at the crews of life-saving stations. That was H. K. Cummings pursuing his avocation, as two or three of his Orleans contemporaries did. On the counter of his dry good store on Main Street, he kept a pile of prints from his negatives, which he sold for 25 cents each. By the time of his death in the 1950s, at 87, Cummings the photographer had amassed about 1,000 views of Orleans scenes and people. His plates and some of his prints are preserved now at the Snow Library, a valuable record in the history of the town. Volume II contains thirty three impressions including Wellfleet Lighthouse, wreck of Charles A Campbell, Orleans Life Saving crew, Orleans Cable Station, salt works, town views and much more. A joy to peruse through, beautifully done. (M). $17.95.

28114. Drew, Bernard A., The Berkshire Photo Album – Historic Images 1870’s – 1990’s. Pittsfield. 1999. 128p. A wonderful collection of some 440 images from The Berkshire Eagle’s extensive archive, this book provides a look at life, love, and labor during the last century and a half in the two cities and thirty towns of Massachusetts’ western-most county. Many of the views are published here for the first time and feature people, places and events both well remembered and long-forgotten. Excellent New England reading. (M). $16.95

2890. Coston, Martha J., SIGNAL SUCCESS. The Work and Travels of Mrs. Martha J. Coston. An Autobiography. Kessinger. 2007. 333p. Reprint. Soft wraps. Widow of the inventor of the Coston flares used extensively by the Life-Saving Service, tells of her efforts to sell his night signals. Martha Coston was born in 1826. Widowed at 21, she discovered her late husband's (a former naval scientist) notes on the invention of a ship-to-ship, land-to-ship pyrotechnic flare signal system. Martha Coston perfected AND then patented her deceased husband’s idea for a pyrotechnic flare. Martha Coston developed the idea into an elaborate system of flares called Night Signals that allowed ships to communicate messages nocturnally. The U. S. Navy eventually bought the patent rights to the flares. Coston’s flares served as the basis of a system of communication that helped to save lives and to win battles. The Coston flare was also used extensively by the U. S. Life Saving Service and later Coast Guard. Martha Coston credited her late husband with the first patent for the flares, but in 1871 she received a patent for an improvement exclusively her own. Her system was also adopted by the governments of France, Italy, Denmark, the Netherlands, and Haiti. As of the late 1970s, the Coston Supply Company established by Mrs. Coston remained in business. This system of bright, long-lasting signal flares revolutionized naval communication and continues to be in use. (M). $36.

27459. (DVD) The Great Ships - The Coast Guard Ships (History Channel) c.2005. New old stock, factory seaeled, from program presented in 1997 on the History Channel and A&E Home Video. The United States Coast Guard has policed the nation's waters since the 1790s. From the first official vessels of the U.S. Government to today's specialized lifesaving craft, the ships of the Guard have played a vital role in maritime history. This in-depth program goes aboard some of the many craft employed by the Coast Guard, from the small boats used for shoreline rescue operations to the deep-sea patrol ships that form the vanguard in America's war against drugs. See dramatic footage of real-life search and rescue operations, and hear incredible stories of life-and-death missions from Coast Guard sailors and officers. And trace the evolution of the Guards' ships from the earliest Revenue Cutters to the myriad vessels of the modern force. The DVD also presents the history of the Coast Guard including the U.S. Life Saving Service and the Revenue Cutter Service to the present day cutters and boats. Color and B&W. 50 minutes. (M) $24.95

27303. Wardius, Barb and Ken. WIND POINT LIGHTHOUSE. Arcadia Publishing. 2007. 128 p. Soft wraps. Several lighthouses have called Racine home, but none is more synonymous with the nautical heritage of the “Belle City” than Wind Point. Always a beehive of activity, the Wind Point Lighthouse is one of the larger lighthouse complexes on the Great Lakes, and a hardworking keeper, two assistants, and their families made their livelihood here. For over 125 years, the tall stately tower has faithfully stood guard, shining its bright beam out over Lake Michigan nightly. Countless mariners relied on the Wind Point Lighthouse, along with a booming trademark foghorn for safe passage. Today the Wind Point Lighthouse is the most well-known symbol of Racine and is a success story among Great Lakes lights. The Wardiuses’ interest in lighthouses began nearly 30 years ago and today, their prints and photos carry the island’s history for future generations. Now they have put the rich lighthouse history into a book, filled with more than 200 archival photographs of the light, keepers and their families, equipment, everyday routines and more. Rare station and crew images  are especially noteworthy. (M).  $19.99.

27301. Rongner, George E. LIFE ABOARD A COAST GUARD LIGHTSHIP. Infinity Publishing. 2007. 247p. Soft wraps. George E. Rongner served 32 years in the U. S. Coast Guard, enlisting as a surfman and rising to Chief Warrant Officer. One of his many assignments included ass Officer in Charge, Buzzards Bay Lightship. His readable account chronicles the ceaseless dangers and constant tedium experienced by the men living closely together at sea for such lengthy periods of time. He describes as no outsider can, how they reacted to the routine, the piercing emanations of the fog signal, and the perils from storms and passing vessels. Former lightship sailor and anyone interested in the sea, will enjoy this look into the everyday life aboard a Coast Guard Lightship. Nicely done, a great read. (M).  $14.95. Reduced $9. 

27296. Kirklin, Wayne. LIGHTSHIPS: Floating Lighthouses Of The Mid-Atlantic. History Press. 2007. 128p. Before radar, depth finders and satellite-guided navigation—before the seafloor was charted with scientific precision—mariners had to rely on alternative means to approach a coastline safely. Lightships played an invaluable role in filling the void. In Lightships, author Wayne Kirklin chronicles the heyday of these crucial navigational aids. (M). $19.99.

27330. D’Entremont, Jeremy. THE LIGHTHOUSES OF MASSACHUSETTS. Beverly. 2007. Soft wraps. 240 p. With The Lighthouses of Massachusetts, author Jeremy D’Entremonthe continues his new series, "Lighthouse Treasury," which describes the fascinating history of our American lighthouses, state by state. The author focuses on the human side of lighthouse history, telling the tales of the courageous keepers, male and female, and their families who kept the beacons burning, braved ferocious storms, and saved hundreds of lives in the days when shipwrecks were commonplace. In The Lighthouses of Massachusetts, D'Entremont continues his definitive series, narrating the histories of more than sixty lights from Buzzards Bay to Newburyport. The Lighthouses of Massachusetts is meticulously researched and copiously illustrated, with photographs from the author's enormous collection. (M). $21.95

27234. Edgett, Ruth. A WATCH IN THE NIGHT: THE STORY OF POMQUET ISLAND ’S LAST LIGHTKEEPING FAMILY. Nimbus. 2007. Soft wraps. 196p. A Watch in the Night chronicles the struggles of one Nova Scotia family to survive on a tiny windswept island without running water, electricity, or reliable communication with the mainland. George and Ruth Millar are in their twenties in April, 1924, when they set out with two small children on their first rowboat voyage to Pomquet Island, half a mile off Bayfield on the southern shore of St. George’s Bay, Nova Scotia. They will spend the next thirty-six years raising children and keeping the light on this bleak teardrop of land. There they will raise generations of livestock, brought up their 6 children, and lived through violent storms and other weather disasters. A Watch in the Night is not a dry account of light-keeping life, but rather a tale in which faith, ingenuity, and tenderness triumph over adversity. A Watch in the Night takes the reader on a memorable voyage through a vital period of Atlantic Canadian history with one extraordinary light-keeping family. (M). $19.95.

27268. Claflin, James W. HISTORIC NANTUCKET: SURFSIDE LIFE-SAVING STATION - A History of Nantucket’s Life-Saving Stations. Volume I. Worcester. 2007. 64 p. Soft wraps. Historic Nantucket: Surfside Life-Saving Station is one of a continuing series of booklets that tell the story of historic lighthouses, lightships and life-saving stations along the New England Coast . The Nantucket coastline has long been one of the most dangerous areas along the New England coast. Over the years four life-saving stations and eight Massachusetts Humane Society stations stood guard over the island’s shores, standing ready to combat the seas in an effort to rescue shipwrecked mariners in their time of need. With thousands of vessels plying the dangerous waters, the chance of a shipping disaster was always great. Hundreds of shipwrecks did indeed occur off the coast with startling losses. Using descriptive text and a variety of vintage images from private as well as museum collections, we get a rare glimpse into the history of the area and the lives of these dedicated government men and women. Author James Claflin combines an extensively researched text with his exquisite collection of vintage photographs, many previously unpublished, to tell the story of this important piece of history. (M). $8.95.  

27259. Barbo, Theresa M., John J. Galluzo and W. Russell Webster. THE PENDLETON DISASTER OFF CAPE COD: THE GREATEST SMALL BOAT RESCUE IN COAST GUARD HISTORY. History Press. 2007. 128p. Soft wraps. Late in February 1952, a northeaster swept New England with bitter cold, snow and gale force winds. East of Chatham 70-knot winds and 60-foot seas battered merchant vessels as the tankers SS Fort Mercer and SS Pendleton met the full force of the storm. They both broke in two on the morning of February 19th with 84 half-frozen men marooned on the battered hulks. Four Coast Guardsmen set out from Cape Cod during a fierce storm in a seemingly impossible quest to locate and rescue the crew of the damaged tanker Pendleton. They returned as heroes. This book chronicles the miraculous true story of Bernie Webber and the Coast Guard 36500. The story of how these men were rescued is retold even today. $19.99.

27223. Sutherland, Kenneth G. UNITED STATES COAST GUARD HARBOR PATROL FLEET 1924-1980. Bloomington. 2007. Soft wraps. 248p. One of the most important activities of the U.S. Coast Guard is Port Security under the control of the Captain of the Port. This book is a first attempt to collect and share data on the various types of small boats used by the  C.O.T.P. On June 15th, 1917, Congress passed the Espionage Act, forming the basis for the Coast Guard's Port Security and Port Safety Missions and by 1918, jurisdiction over the anchorage and movement of vessels in harbors changed from the War Department to the Treasury Department, with Coast Guard officers as Captains of the Ports. The U. S. Coast Guard's Port Security Small Boat Stations and Units have a long and proud tradition of duty and service, from enforcing the rules and regulations to anti-sabotage patrols, search and rescue, fire-fighting, and placing marine inspection teams aboard large supertankers underway in all weather conditions. Covering the period from 1924-1980, this book provides the first look at the variety of craft used to carry out these missions. (M). Published at $34.99. Our price $31.99.

    

27171. Hall, Thomas. THE T.W. LAWSON: THE FATE OF THE WORLD'S ONLY SEVEN-MASTED SCHOONER. Charlestown . 2006. 160p. Soft wrtaps. Over 70 images. Armed with curiosity and a desire to piece together the story of the world’s only seven-masted schooner, Tom Hall spent years researching, diving on the Lawson wreck and interviewing the relatives of those involved in the rescue efforts. The result of his work is the most complete account of the T.W. Lawson’s story, ranging from her building and launch in Massachusetts to her fated wreck off the Scilly Isles. Wonderfully illustrated, a joy to peruse. (M). $21.99.

27155. Waugh, Chris. MISTY MEMORIES OF GUARD ISLAND, ALASKA – Ketchikan’s Legacy of a Lighthouse Family. Newport . 2006. 135. Soft wraps. In 1952 the author’s young family moved to tiny Guard Island Light Station, 12 miles northwest of Ketchikan , Alaska . As a child, Chris lived at this isolated lighthouse island for almost two years. Her parents related the details of their lives there, and her father took pictures to document them. This story is about their life, laughter and tears as they lived in confinement and isolation. It's also about going back, which they did more than fifty years later. (M).  $14.95.

 

27179b. Kroll, C. Douglas. COMMODORE ELLSWORTH P. BERTHOLF – First Commandant of the Coast Guard. Annapolis. 2002. 160p. DJ. Written by a former Coast Guard officer, the book chronicles Bertholf’s colorful early career with the service when he patrolled the vast reaches of the Pacific, enforced maritime laws regulating the fishing, sealing, and whaling industries, participated in daring rescues, and transported Siberian reindeer from Russia to the starving Inuits. When Ellsworth P. Bertholf was court-martialed and dismissed from the Naval Academy for a hazing incident, no one could have predicted his future greatness. But undaunted by his experience at the academy, Bertholf pursued a career in the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service and by 1902 had earned a special Gold Medal of Honor from the U.S. Congress for his role in a dramatic overland relief expedition to Alaska. By 1915 he had bypassed twenty-two officers senior to him to become the first commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard and went on to successfully steer his fledgling service through the trials of World War I. This biography of the man who has been called the savior of the Coast Guard offers a revealing portrait not only of Bertholf but also of the last years of the Revenue Cutter and Life-Saving Services and the early formative years of the Coast Guard. (F). $49.95.

27201. Pinyerd, David. LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING ON THE OREGON COAST. 2007. Arcadia Publishing. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. The Oregon Coast has been the site of shipwrecks even before Lewis and Clark’s arrival in 1805. Even as the population grew, the federal government let the Oregon Coast go unguarded by lighthouses and lifesavers for decades. Economic and political pressures finally forced the government to build the first Oregon lighthouse in 1857 at the Umpqua River. The LifeSaving Service followed in 1878 with a station at the mouth of Coos Bay. Eventually, most of the harbor entrances and headlands were protected by both the Lighthouse Service and the LifeSaving Service, the precursor to today’s Coast Guard. Lighthouses and Lifesaving on the Oregon Coast commemorates the true heroes who served to warn, protect, and rescue those who went to sea. Another in the series from Arcadia , a well known publisher of local and regional histories, this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99

         

27200. Roales, Judith. DELAWARE LIGHTHOUSES AND RANGE LIGHTS. 2007. Arcadia Publishing. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. Delaware does not usually come to mind as one of America’s great maritime states. Yet it has a long history of “firsts,” innovations, and improvements in lighthouse construction and technology dating from the beginning of lighthouse history in the United States. One of the original six lighthouses built before the founding of this country was in Delaware. In the following years, major offshore lighthouses and an extensive system of range lights were established. At the height of its lighthouse history, Delaware had 27 manned light stations that warned mariners of the shoals and colliding currents at the mouth of the Delaware Bay and guided ships safely from the Atlantic Ocean to the inland ports of Wilmington and Philadelphia. Most of Delaware’s lighthouses are gone now, preserved only in faded photographs and yellowed documents such as those collected here. The lights that remain struggle daily to survive the punishing hands of vandals and Mother Nature. Another in the series from Arcadia , a well known publisher of local and regional histories, this volume drawns from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99

27199. Ewing, Wallace K and David H. Seibold. MARITIME GRAND HAVEN: COAST GUARD CITY USA. 2006. Arcadia Publishing. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. Settlers arrived at the mouth of the Grand River on November 2, 1834. Their community was christened Grand Haven, as it offered a secure harbor. As the logging industry grew, shipping expanded, and Grand Haven Harbor became especially busy during the financial boom and westward expansion that followed the Civil War. Northwest Ottawa County became an established resort destination, and passenger boats frequented the harbor as well. Heavy traffic through Grand Haven caused concern about shipwrecks. The first crew of lifesavers was formed in 1871 and soon joined the United States Lifesaving Service. In 1915, the United States Lifesaving Service merged with the United States Coast Guard. Grand Haven has long had a proud association with these dedicated crews, and in 1998, the relationship was marked when Congress designated it “Coast Guard City USA.” Another in the series from Arcadia , a well known publisher of local and regional histories, this volume drawns from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99

   

2789. THEY HAD TO GO OUT – True Stories of America’s Coastal Life Savers From The Pages of “Wreck & Rescue Journal”. Gwinn. 2007. Forward by Fred Stonehouse. 208p. Soft wraps. They Had to Go Out represents an unprecedented gathering works of talented historians working in the field of Life Saving Service history, taken from the pages of Wreck & Rescue Journal. Included are the writings of Ralph Shanks, Fred Stonehouse, Dennis L. Noble, Maurice Gibbs, and John Galluzzo.The stories reach from Massachusetts to Michigan to Washington, covering some of the accounts of bravado and selflessness of the men of the U. S. Life Saving Service, shedding more light on perhaps the most exciting aspect of America’s maritime history. (M). Published at $16.95. Our price $15.95.

26323. Trapani , Robert Jr. DELAWARE LIGHTS – A History of Lighthouses in the First State . History Press. 2007. 160 p. Soft wraps. In Delaware Lights, this noted author recounts the stories of twenty-seven beacons from the lost Cape Henlopen Light Station, completed in 1767, to the Marcus Hook Range Rear Light Station, constructed in 1920. He not only discusses their construction and the changes they have undergone, but also tells dramatic tales of their keepers, who sometimes braved storms, isolation and poor conditions so that the lights would stay burning for those at sea. Trapani also brings Delaware ’s lighthouse history full circle by conveying to the reader that though these guiding beacons are now automated and aging, the lights are hardly finished making history here in the 21st century. (M).  $19.99.

27101. Szelog, Thomas and Lee Ann Szelog. OUR POINT OF VIEW – Fourteen Years at a Maine Lighthouse. Down East Books. 2007. 112p. DJ. Beautifully illustrated with 106 color photos by the authors. Our Point of View offers moving personal glimpses about living in a lighthouse keeper's home, as well as arrestingly beautiful visual images of the lighthouse and property and views from this one-of-a-kind vantage point.  Tom and Lee Szelog were the first tenants to live in the newly renovated former lightkeeper’s house at Marshall Point Light in Port Clyde, Maine. Being a professional photographer, Tom naturally kept a visual record of their years at Marshall Point. Both of the Szelogs also kept personal journals, and when the time came to put together a record of their time in this most remarkable home, they delved back into their journals, selecting the most vivid and interesting recollections to share with their readers. After nearly 14 years at the Marshall Point light-keeper’s house, the Szelogs moved to their current home in Whitefield, Maine where they bring this glimpse of their lighthouse life to you. (M). $24.95.

27108. Roberts, William. LIGHTHOUSES AND LIVING ALONG THE FLORIDA GULF COAST. Bloomington. 2005. 97p. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. Here is a true story of the Roberts family's three generations of lighthouse keepers in the U. S. Lighthouse Service. Their dedication and devotion began in 1894 when grandfather was assigned to the Cape St. George Lighthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, and lasted over fifty-eight years and three generations. This account, recorded by a family member, includes their lighthouses, family lives, maintaining and  operating the lighthouses, as well as childhood stories of his  growing up on lighthouse stations during the depression years of the late 1920's and 1930's. (M). $21.95.

  

2790. Dalton , J. W., THE LIFE SAVERS OF CAPE COD . 1902. Reprint 1991. Parnassus. 155p. Soft wraps. Profusely illustrated with over 100 fine b/w photographs, illustrations and maps, this is certainly the finest and most complete history of the Life-Saving Service and its 13 posts on the outer reaches of Cape Cod ever written. The Life Savers of Cape Cod brings to life a unique age of heroism along the treacherous shores of Olde Cape Cod. In 1902, writer J. W. Dalton set out to visit each of the thirteen U. S. Life-Saving Service stations on Cape Cod, from Wood End in the north to Monomoy Point in the south. His book, The Life Savers of Cape Cod, published late that year, remains the most minutely detailed account of station life at the high point of the service's existence. Dalton's research covers not only the history of the service and descriptions of each station, but also provides a paragraph on each and every keeper and surfman then serving along the Cape's seashore. Also included is information on the men, equipment, construction and modifications of the buildings, rescues,  even entries on the names and habits of the stations' pets. Included too is the account of Keeper Seth Ellis of the Monomoy station, lone survivor of the life-saving disaster of the previous March 17.  Excellent reading on the subject, wonderful photographs. (M).  $9.95.

26315. Wermiel, Sara E. LIGHTHOUSES: Norton/Library of Congress Visual Sourcebooks in Architecture, Design & Engineering. New York. 2006. 384 p. DJ. This pictorial survey of the icon of steadfastness and strength: the American lighthouse, is the newest addition to the Norton/Library of Congress series. This abundantly illustrated book conveys the romance and beauty of lighthouses and beacons while explaining the development of the forms, materials, architecture, and engineering of their structure: wood, masonry, cast-iron plate, on- and off-shore skeletal, caisson, and reinforced concrete. It covers lighthouses from all parts of the United States from the late eighteenth century to the 1940s, when control of lighthouses was transferred to the U.S. Coast Guard. Numerous images of lighthouses from coast to coast provide examples of striking design and setting, celebrate technological achievement and the work of important engineers, and include associated structures such as keepers' quarters, fog signal buildings, boathouses and boat railroads, cistern buildings, barns, and workshops, as well as interiors and working details of the light mechanisms. With over 1200 illustrations, many of rarely seen views, this is sure to be one of the better books this year. Includes CD-ROM containing all of the images shown in the book for even better viewing. (M). Publisher’s price $75. Our price $69.95.

Signed by the author:

2743.  Fredrickson, Arthur C. and Lucy F. FREDRICKSON'S  HISTORY OF THE ANN ARBOR AUTO AND TRAIN FERRIES - Complete With Pictures. Frankfort. 1994. 158 p. Soft wraps. The carferries came in, and during their brief stay they did so much to develop our present system of transportations, and then were so easily forgotten after they had gone. The facts in this history of Ann Arbor carferries have come from notations in the many log books of these little known vessels. The stories built around these facts were furnished by the knowing seafaring men who were present at these times. As many of these men have long since passed on, these stories are all the more valuable. (M). $9.95.

726b. Coffin, Edward Wayman. NANTUCKET ’S FORGOTTEN ISLAND - MUSKEGET. [self published] 1996. 114p. Soft wraps. Autographed by author. Lying northeast of Nantucket , just eight miles from Martha’s Vineyard , Muskeget is a low bleak island, ringed with sandy shoals and often entrapped by foul weather. Often ice bound in winter with high tides, Muskeget was the scene of many shipwrecks through the years. Its population consisted of the men of the Life-Saving Station with only seasonal increases by the local Island Club gunners taking advantage of the prolific fowl population. This unusual book is written from the point of view of an islander and a surfman (the author’s father served on the island as a surfman). The book relates many interesting tales formerly untold - fully 60% of the book tells of the surfmen and their daily lives, with interesting comments on the life and recreation of the seasonal population. Also included are many rare photographs from private collections. Privately published in a very limited quantity (only 490 printed, quite difficult to find now. (VG+).  $36.

26348. Duncan, Robert C., Roger S. Duncan, W. Wallace Fenn, and Paul W. Fenn THE CRUISING GUIDE TO THE NEW ENGLAND COAST-  Including the Hudson River, Long Island Sound, and the Coast of New Brunswick. New York. 2002. Twelfth Edition  827p. DJ. Here, entirely updated, is the latest edition of the most complete, authoritative cruising guide to the northeastern coast.  The bible for Eastern sailors and power boaters for more than half a century has been thoroughly overhauled and expertly refitted. For the preparation of the twelfth edition, the authors visited nearly all the harbors, talked with harbormasters and marina owners, and reevaluated earlier judgments. The Guide tells you how to dodge bad currents and edge around shoal water, and where to anchor and find essential services, including pump-out stations, fuel docks, and a hot shower. It notes channels and harbors that have been dredged or shoaled up; recently replaced buoys; and changes in marinas, boatyards, and other facilities.  This guide is far more than a traditional cruising guide, providing valuable information on weather, tides, coastal geography and geology, fog, marine birds, animals, sea conditions, and even places of historical interest ashore. The authors—who know these great cruising grounds as old friends—relate the histories of the towns, ports, vessels, lighthouses, and even rocks you'll encounter. Black-and-white photographs and maps throughout. (M). Published at $49.95. Our price $45.  

 26349. Boyer, Marie-France. SPIRIT OF THE SEA. New York. 2003. 120p. DJ. The cry of a seagull, a plume of spray, the bright pink of a plastic float, boxes of glittering fish on the quay, fishermen's wooden sheds—all these stir in us deep memories of the sea. Marie-France Boyer takes us on a voyage to fishing communities along the coasts of the North Atlantic and the shores of the Channel and the North Sea. She takes us to the heart of our collective memory, gathering traces of this separate seagoing world, which is both familiar and romantic. Lines, nets, lobster pots, marker flags, buoys, and anchors—from Boulogne to Birarritz, from Fécamp to the Ile d'Ouessant, from Maine to Norfolk, there remains an ancient repertoire, a visual imagery of richness and power. This book celebrates the harsh and singular world of fishermen, and reveals the poetry of the everyday. 147 illustrations, 131 in color. (M). $24.95.

  

26299. Hoyt, Susan Roark. LIGHTHOUSES OF NORTHWEST MICHIGAN. Chicago. 2004. 128 p. Soft wraps. Lighthouses of Northwest Michigan is a companion to the author’s first work Lighthouses Of Southwest Michigan. This work completes the history, covering the lighthouses on Lake Michigan’s eastern shore. When settlers first reached this area, rudimentary harbors in this area made docking and loading hazardous while shoals and reefs, hidden beneath the water's surface, threatened to ravage the unsuspecting vessels. The need for lighthouses to mark these dangerous waters and harbor entrances was crucial to prevent the loss of lives and valuable cargo. Through a rare collection of archival photographs, this book explores these fascinating structures and the people who maintained them. (M). $19.99. 

 

26327. Bunting, W. H. THE CAMERA’S COAST - Historic Images of Ship and Shore in New England. Historic New England . 2006. 144p. 252 B&W photographs and color illustrations. With an Introduction by John R. Stilgoe. The Camera’s Coast: Historic Images of Ship and Shore in New England is a wonderful collection of historic photographs, paired with a rich assortment of ephemera—the subtle colors of an old postcard, the seductive details of an advertisement, a gay poster—engagingly captioned by W. H. Bunting. This page-by-page panorama of New England coastal activity from the late-nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries ranges from the ordinary to the extraordinary, from leisure and recreation to hard work. The imagery is mostly bygone but still strongly connected to our present-day landscape. Begun several years ago as a traveling Historic New England exhibition of photographs with informative captions by guest curator and maritime historian Bunting, he brings these vintage photographs to life with their stories – a captivating account. In this beautifully designed book, additional images from Historic New England's diverse collection of ephemera have been carefully selected by the editors to augment the photographs and to flesh out Bunting’s stories. Wonderful gift or reference. (M). $29.95.

26300. Muller, Robert G. NEW YORK STATE LIGHTHOUSES. Chicago. 2004. 128 p. Soft wraps. New York State Lighthouses explores the great lighthouse heritage of New York State. Second only to Michigan in the number of lighthouses it contains, New York boasts a lighthouse legacy that stretches from the Great Lakes to the tip of Long Island. Many of these lighthouses, even some no longer in existence, were photographed for use on early postcards and these images are assembled for the first time in the pages of this book. The culmination of over five years of research and study, this work provides a most interesting view of New York’s many light stations. (M).   $19.99.

26279. Duffus, Kevin P. SHIPWRECKS OF THE OUTER BANKS – An Illustrated Guide. Raleigh . 2006. 176p. Soft wraps. It is the most frequently asked question by visitors to North Carolina ’s Outer Banks. Once, the remains of shipwrecks covered nearly every mile of shoreline. Today, most have vanished—either salvaged, burned, buried, stolen or vandalized—but not all. Hundreds of rare and remarkable photographs have also survived. Researcher, writer and filmmaker, Kevin Duffus, has roamed the beaches and searched the faded files of archives to create this photographic companion to historian David Stick’s definitive, “Graveyard of the  Atlantic .” Four color format with over 250 images, Duffus' new book is a visual record of shipwrecks and their legacy—lifesaving, salvage, rumors of wreckers, and the hundreds of forgotten shipwreck victims buried among the dunes. Duffus explains the various causes of shipwrecks and why there is a Graveyard of the  Atlantic in the first place, what it was like for passengers and crews when ships crashed into the breakers along the banks, and the true stories of some of the most incredible rescues. Duffus shares the memories of the Outer Banks’ last living lighthouse keeper, the descendants of lifesavers, residents who played on shipwrecks as children, and one well-known historian who used to dance on the deck of a wrecked vessel. In addition to GPS locations and directions to dozens of wreck sites, this book includes new research on historic sites altered by inlet migration and a tribute to the forgotten heroes of the islands. The book's foreword was written by David Stick, who has described the volume as the long-awaited sequel to his nearly six decade old and still in print, Graveyard of the  Atlantic . (M). $24.95.

        

26280. (DVD). The Graveyard of the Atlantic - 400 Years of Shipwrecks, Mysteries and Heroic Rescues. A film by Kevin Duffus. For more than four centuries, seafaring vessels have traversed the tempestuous and deadly ocean waters that have been known, nearly as long, as the Graveyard of the Atlantic. In all, more than 1,000 unlucky vessels and their crews and passengers were forced to make the ocean waters and beaches along North Carolina’s Outer Banks their final port of call, representing one of the greatest densities of shipwrecks in the world. It is simply one of the most dramatic and poignant chapters in U.S. maritime history. Featured in this award-winning 90-minute film are the unparalleled rescues of the crews of the Ephraim Williams (1884) and the Priscilla (1899). Learn how shipwrecks provided a way of life and often a means of survival for the residents of these isolated barrier islands. Rare interviews with native Outer Bankers who witnessed many shipwrecks relate the excitement, intrigue and compassion caused by the shouts, “Ship ashore!” Narrated by popular newscaster and musician, Bill Leslie. 90 minute DVD $19.95.  

26281. (DVD) War Zone - World War II Off North Carolina’s Outer Banks. A film by Kevin Duffus. In 1942, the United States suffered one of its worst defeats of WWII, not in Europe or the Pacific, but along the nation’s eastern seaboard. Three hundred ninety-seven ships were sunk or damaged and nearly 5,000 people were killed. For six months, 65 German U-boats hunted merchant ships practically unopposed within view of coastal communities. The greatest concentration of these attacks occurred off North Carolina’s Outer Banks. “War Zone” features eyewitness accounts of lifesavers, merchant sailors and residents, and describes how life was altered when war was waged on Outer Banker’s doorsteps. Learn the truth behind decades-old urban legends of German spies, saboteurs and sympathizers. Viewers will marvel at the courage of a young mother who delivered her newborn son in a storm-tossed lifeboat off Cape Hatteras and how the event marked a turning point in the battle of “Torpedo Junction.” Most amazing is the first-hand account of the nearly calamitous first engagement between a U-boat and a U.S. Navy destroyer, and the sinking of the U-701, just 22 miles from Hatteras. “War Zone” is a story of infamy, irony, and innocence lost. 180 minute 2-DVD Set $19.95. 

Just Out. 26143. Porter, Jane Molloy. FRIENDLY EDIFICES: PISCATAQUA LIGHTHOUSES AND OTHER AIDS TO NAVIGATION 1771-1939. Portsmouth. 2006. 568 pp. Cloth covered. 168 illustrations. The five lighthouses of the Piscataqua region of New Hampshire and Maine are among the most admired structures of their type in America - Nubble Light, York, Maine; Boon Island Light, Maine; Whale’s Back Light, Kittery, Maine; White Island Light, Rye, New Hampshire; Fort Constitution Light, New Castle, New Hampshire. The construction of a lighthouse is not a simple matter. In addition to being able to project a warning light, the structure also must be able to withstand the foul coastal weather, especially here where the North Atlantic brings crashing waves and strong winds. Before a lighthouse could be built, funds had to be authorized usually from public sources, and politicians, whether local or state or national, had to be convinced that the expenditure is warranted. After lighthouse specifications were written, contractors had to carry out those plans. Bricks, wood, iron, and steel have supported the local lights for centuries, although four of the five lighthouses have been replaced at least once. Finally, the lights had to be maintained, a task originally charged to a keeper and often his family lived with him. In addition to the extensive details about lighthouse construction, maintenance, and operation, the author also discusses the design and placement of various aids to navigation, such as the river and ocean buoys that protect mariners from hidden rocks and ledges, fog signals, and breakwaters that created safe harbors. Chock full of superb information, vintage as well as color images and much more will keep you engrossed for many hours. If you get only one book this year, this should be the one. (M). Published at $34.95. Our price $32.95

26264. Snyder, James D. A LIGHT IN THE WILDERNESS The Story of the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & the Southeast Florida Frontier.  North Pa lm Beach . 2006. 287p. DJ. Filled with vintage photographs. In his fourth book about South Florida’s rich history, James D. Snyder explores the role of the Jupiter Lighthouse and how it transformed the southeastern coast of Florida . $35,000 was provided by Congress in 1853 for establishing a lighthouse “near Jupiter inlet, to mark the dangerous shoals lying of that point, and to guide vessels along that coast.” With the completion of the lighthouse plans, five hundred tons of building materials were assembled and shipped to the  Indian River inlet using shallow draft scows. However, in 1855, just as construction on the tower had started, a group of careless surveyors in the  Everglades destroyed the prized banana plants of Chief Billy Bowlegs, touching off the Third Seminole War. Despite these difficulties, and a combination of malaria and yellow fever, brick by brick, the tower slowly rose to its preordained height of 108 feet. A two-story dwelling for a head keeper and two assistants was built near the base of the hill in 1859. After $60, 859.98, almost twice the original appropriation, was spent on the construction work, the lighthouse finally commenced operation on July 10, 1860. With more than seventy rare photos, maps and letters, Mr. Snyder will describe how the lighthouse construction progressed, and how the region survived the aftermath of the Civil War and built the steamboat-railroad link that brought the first influx of pioneers to this “Garden of Eden.” (M). $27.95.  

26212. Tag, Thomas A.  CHURCH STEEPLES AND FOG SIGNALS. Dayton. 2006. 20p. Spiral bound. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – Church Steeples and Fog Signals. This detailed account covers a long neglected area of lighthouse equipment – the mechanical weight-driven fog bell strikers. The author covers a history of fog bells, bell construction, wave actuated bells and clockwork-striking machinery. Included are Lowell Fog Bell Strikers, Custer Strikers, Daboll Strikers, Stevens, Gamewell, and more. Thoroughly illustrated with early photographs and  drawings, this booklet makes most interesting reading.  (M). #26212   $26.

26239. Butts, Ed. GUIDING LIGHTS TRAGIC SHADOWS. Toronto. 2006. 272p. A peaceful lighthouse at Prescott, Ontario, was once the flashpoint of American invasion in an undeclared war. Robbers called "Blackbirds" preyed on Lake Erie shipping, using false beacons to confuse their victims. The lighthouse at Oswego, New York, was the site of one of the worst disasters in the history of the United States Coast Guard. A Lake Huron lightkeeper wiped snow off the window of his lamp room, and inadvertently caused a shipwreck. A 14-year-old Detroit River lightkeeper¹s daughter was the heroine in a courageous rescue. Lighthouses, from the Upper St. Lawrence River to the head of Lake Superior, have played an integral role in the history, romance, lore and legends of the Lakes. The towers and their keepers bore witness to, and participated in, the dramas of war, shipwrecks, and daring rescues. All while enduring the privations of one of the loneliest occupations on earth. $24.95

26236. Baird, David. LIGHTHOUSES OF ATLANTIC CANADA. 240p. Calgary. 2003. Soft wraps. This colorful book traces the origins of more than 250 lighthouses from the beginning to the present day. This expansive volume is packed with more than 350 photographs and illustrations depicting light stations from the famed Peggy's Point to more remote outposts. Includes some great vintage photos, as well as views of lanterns, lenses and more. Also included are access maps and driving instructions for visiting the lighthouses. Highly recommend. (M). $24.95.

26208. Wardius, Barb and Ken. CANA ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE. Arcadia Publishing. 2006. 128 p. Soft wraps. The beautiful peninsula of Door County has a long and bountiful tradition of maritime history, including its many lighthouses, and the Cana Island has illuminated the coastline on the Lake Michigan side of Door County for over 100 years. The Cana Island Lighthouse is one of the most picturesque of any lighthouses still operating on the Great Lakes today. The Wardiuses’ interest in lighthouses began at Cana Island nearly 30 years ago. Today, their prints and photos carry the island’s history for future generations. Now they have put the island’s rich lighthouse history into a book, filled with more than 200 archival photographs of the light, keepers and their families, equipment, everyday routines and more. Rare station and crew images  are especially noteworthy. (M).  $19.99.  

26211. LaGuardia-Kotite, Martha J. So Others May Live – Coast Guard Rescue Swimmers: Saving Lives, Defying Death. Guilford. 2006. 208p. DJ. So Others May Live is the untold story of the U.S. Coast Guard’s quiet but resolute rescue swimmers. From deep ocean caves on the Oregon coast to the panicked and chaotic streets of post-Katrina New Orleans, here are their stunningly heroic stories and the greatest maritime rescues attempted since the program began in 1985. These feats, told through the eyes of the heroes, reveal an understanding of how and why the rescuer, with flight crew assistance, risks his or her own life to reach out to save a stranger. The book covers diverse environments: oceans, hurricanes, oil rigs, caves, sinking vessels, floods, and even Niagara Falls. It is truly a can’t-put-it-down collection of accounts. (M). ). Published at $22.95.  Our Price $21.95.  

26193. DeRaps, Ernest G. (US Coast Guard, Retired) and Pauline E Fitzgerald DeRaps. LIGHTHOUSE KEEPING / LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING. Wells. 2006. 128 p. Soft wraps. Two lighthouse books in one - FogHorn Publishing has just released a very unique book, which is actually two books in one, of the memories and stories of lighthouse life from the first hand accounts of a family that actually lived the lighthouse life. This unique book is written with two titles - Lighthouse Keeping, by Coast Guard Keeper Ernest G. DeRaps and Light Housekeeping, by his wife Pauline DeRaps. This wonderful book, depicting the DeRaps’s family life on three Penobscot Bay Maine lighthouses and Ernest’s life at a stag station south of Vinalhaven, Maine. It is packed with amazing and heartwarming stories that are more than just a “good read”. In fact, we’ll bet that you won’t be able to stop reading once you start. First you can read Ernest DeRaps stories as he recalls the life of a lighthouse keeper. His stories are intertwined with his own original pen & ink sketches of life at the lighthouses. After reading Ernest’s side of the story and viewing the full color photos, you will then need to flip the book 180 degrees and read Pauline’s side of the story for an entirely different perspective of the same events and stories. This book is a must have for a lighthouse aficionado. (M).  $19.95.  

26148. Mills, Chris. LIGHTHOUSE LEGACIES. Halifax. 2006. Imagine living your life perched on a tiny island, without electricity, exposed to the fury of the sea, and always at the service of the mariner. This is how lightkeepers and their families spent their lives, even up until the 1960s. We are very close to losing the last of the people who lived this isolated life and experienced the heyday of lightkeeping in Canada. Lighthouse Legacies lets us share in the memories of those who kept the lights. These stories are presented largely in the words of the people, with context and history by author Chris Mills. Each chapter deals with an element of lighthouse life and is complemented by photos from lighthouse family collections, the Coast Guard and Mills’ own collection. Great reading. (M). $24.95

Claflin, James W. HISTORIC NANTUCKET LIGHTSHIPS: NEW SOUTH SHOAL 1854-1896. 72 pages. 20 vintage photos. Worcester. 2005. $8.95

Other titles in this series include: Brant Point Lighthouse, Sankaty Head Lighthouse, Great Point Lighthouse, Race Point Lighthouse.

Just Out. 26135. Harrison, Timothy E. PORTLAND HEAD LIGHT - A Pictorial Journey Through Time. Wells. 2006. 154 p. Soft wraps. 8 ½” x 11”. An unusual format, this detailed work by noted lighthouse historian and writer Tim Harrison utilizes over 100 early photographs, postcard views and other images to detail the lives of the keepers of Portland Head Light, from the days of the U.S. Lighthouse Service to the days of U.S Coast Guard and then the present. Superb accounts by keeper and author Robert Sterling, as well as members of the Strout family, who kept the light at Portland Head for over 100 years, make this a most interesting read. Includes many early, rare photos, memories and storied about the keepers and their families, their pets, work and improvements to the station over the years, and much more. (M). $24.95

26164. Kellogg, James [ed]. Burke, Harry Rosencrans. FROM THE DAY’S JOURNEY. St. Louis. 2006. 129p. Soft wraps. Harry Rosecrans Burke worked as a newspaper reporter and later editor in rural Iowa, Oregon, Idaho and California from 1915 until his retirement in the 1950’s. In 1924 he completed his book of essays on local St. Louis history in his book From the Day's Journey. Here local author and historian James Kellogg has republished this rare work giving us the opportunity to look through this window into the past. Burke's original essays about St. Louis locales from the 1920s and '30s have been expanded by the author’s notes and recollections as he revisits many of the same places and subjects to add his own updates to the material. (M).   $39.95.

1259. na. Lighthouses of the World. International Association of Marine Aids to Navigation. 1998. Globe Pequot. 172p. Soft wraps. Absolutely stunning, full-color guide showcases more than 125 unique lighthouses from around the world. Includes full color photos throughout, country-by-country listing, with detailed maps, general and historical descriptions, information on architects ands builders, construction, locations, and more. (M). $24.95. 

2699. D’Entremont, Jeremy. THE LIGHTHOUSES OF RHODE ISLAND. Beverly. 2006. Soft wraps. 240 p. With The Lighthouses of Rhode Island, author Jeremy D’Entremonthe continues his new series, "Lighthouse Treasury," which describes the fascinating history of our American lighthouses, state by state. Read about: A feud between two keepers at Whale Rock Light led to a harrowing life-and-death chase; The hurricane of 1938 devastated the state's lighthouses. The keepers at Plum Beach Light off North Kingstown miraculously escaped with their lives; others weren't so lucky; Ida Lewis lived at Newport's Lime Rock Light for more than 60 years and became one of the world's most celebrated lightkeepers; The keeper and his family at Block Island North Light aided the survivors of one of New England's worst shipwrecks, the Larchmont disaster of 1907; Pomham Rocks Light on the Providence River was home to a famous fish-catching cat; and much more. The Lighthouses of Rhode Island is meticulously researched and copiously illustrated, with photographs from the author's enormous collection. (M).  $14.95

Once Again Available:

8207. Chenery, Richard L. III., OLD COAST GUARD STATIONS VOLUME I – VIRGINIA: POPES ISLAND TO FALSE CAPE . 2004. 2nd.  94p. Soft wraps. 70 photographs and illustrations. Just Released by well known author Richard L. Chenery, III. In this first of a series, Mr. Chenery provides wonderful details about the little known early years of the Coast Guard. Included are recollections of veteran surfmen, surfmen’s uniform and insignia, beach apparatus drills, covers the Early Coast Period from 1915 to early 1960’s, details surfboats, motor lifeboats and DUKWs, pulling boat drills and races, WW II beach patrols, Life-Saving Branch, and much more…Mr Chenery has been researching the early Coast Guard for a number of years and has a particularly fine knowledge of early uniforms and insignia, as well as stations and equipment. In Volume I he covers the lifeboat stations in Virginia in wonderful detail, with excellent photos and illustrations, many never before published. 8 ½” x 11”. A MUST for your library !              Retail priced at only $17.95.

20248. Chenery, Richard L. III., OLD COAST GUARD STATIONS VOLUME II – NORTH CAROLINA. 2004. 2nd.  123p. Soft wraps. 113 photographs and illustrations, with 2 maps of North Carolina lifeboat station locations. Just Released by well known author Richard L. Chenery, III. In this second in the series, Mr. Chenery provides covers all 29 of the old lifeboat stations along this section of coastline. Included are wonderful details about the little known early years of the Coast Guard along the North Carolina coast. Included are recollections of veteran surfmen, surfmen’s uniform and insignia, beach apparatus drills, covers the Early Coast Period from 1915 to the 1950’s, details surfboats, motor lifeboats and DUKWs, award of gold and silver lifesaving medals, Coast Guard Day surfboat races, heroic rescues, the last breeches buoy rescue in North Carolina, WW II beach patrols, Life-Saving Branch, and much more…Mr Chenery has been researching the early Coast Guard for a number of years and has a particularly fine knowledge of early uniforms and insignia, as well as stations and equipment. In Volume I Mr. Chenery covered the lifeboat stations in Virginia in wonderful detail, with excellent photos and illustrations, many never before published. 8 ½” x 11”. A MUST for your library !       Retail priced at only $17.95.

26134. Trapani , Robert Jr. LIGHTHOUSES OF MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA – History, Mystery, Legends and Lore. Elkton. 2006. 170 P. Soft wraps. Lighthouses Of Maryland and Virginia presents stories and photographs of 20 lighthouses with the focus being the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Coast. Trapani 's stories feature unusual incidents associated with each silent sentinel. Tales of murder and intrigue, along with storms, explosions, shipwrecks, ghost stories and romance are spotlighted in this easy-to-read collection of short stories. Using historical photographs, U.S. Coast Guard documents, newspaper articles and personal interviews, Trapani has created an informative and interesting book that shares an import part of the region's history and lore. Maryland Lights include: Bloody Point Bar, Concord Point, Great Shoals, Holland Island Bar, Point Lookout, Seven Foot Knoll, Sharkfin Shoal, Sharps Island, Thomas Point Shoal, and Turkey Point.Virginia Lights include: Assateague, Back River, Killock Shoal, Lambert's Point, Smith Point, Thimble Shoal, Wolf Trap and York Spit. There also is information on preservation efforts at Thomas Point Shoal, Hooper Strait, Drum Point and Piney Point lights. Particularly interesting are the accounts if the keepers’ lives, their difficulties and efforts to make do. (M).  $11.95.  

26133. Fischer, Katrina Sigsbee and Alex A. Hurst. ANTON OTTO FISCHER: Marine Artist. Nantucket. 1984. 235 p. DJ. Signed by the author. Published in 1984 and long out-of-print, this is a fascinating, generously illustrated biography of an impoverished man who became a much loved marine artist. A seaman first, Anton Otto Fischer (1882-1962) got his start in the art world as a model and general helper for A.B. Frost, later becoming a very popular illustrator for such publications as The Saturday Evening Post. He also illustrated Moby Dick, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea and the rare tale "Tugboat Annie." The marine paintings collected here often depict the dramatic moments of battle and their aftermath, and the trials of travel and immigration by ocean. Beautifully detailed with strong emotional content. 235 illustrations include photographs, sketches, drawings, pen & ink, and paintings (many in color). $45

26122. Tag, Thomas A. THE FRESNEL LENS MAKERS PART V – THE BARBIER, BENARD AND TURENNS (BBT) LENS WORKS. Dayton . 2006. 11 P. Soft wraps. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – The Fresnel Lens Makers Part V – The Barbier, Benard And Turenns (BBT) Lens Works. Part V of six parts, describes the development of the early Fresnel lenses and defines the companies and individuals who took part in this effort. Augustin Fresnel had assistance from many sources as he developed and perfected his lens. This part details the work of the Barbier, Benard And Turenns (BBT) in France. From its beginnings in the 1860’s  the company was one of the leading makers of Fresnel lenses for the world market, and to its current status as today’s Samtec-Gisman Company, still producing navigation buoys.  (M).  $26.

2679. Shanks, Ralph and Lisa Woo Shanks, Editor. INDIAN BASKETS OF CENTRAL CALIFORNIA - ART, CULTURE, AND HISTORY. Native American Basketry From San Francisco Bay And Monterey Bay North To Mendocino And East To The Sierras. Novato. 2006. 176 p. 200 photographs. DJ. This unique book provides a complete study of the exquisite Native American basketry from the San Francisco Bay Area and the Monterey Bay region north to Sonoma, Napa, and Mendocino and eastward across the Sacramento Valley to the crest of the Sierras. Baskets of the Pomo, Ohlone (Costanoan), Coast Miwok, Esselen, Huchnom, Lake Miwok, Maidu, Wappo, and Yuki people are lavishly illustrated and knowledgably and sensitively described. Color photographs and drawings illustrate the rare, fine California Indian baskets from museum and private collections in the United States and Europe. The vast majority of these baskets are illustrated for the first time. Ralph Shanks is vice president of the Miwok Archaeological Preserve of Marin. Lisa Woo Shanks is editor of the Basketry of California and Oregon Series. They are the authors of The North American Indian Travel Guide, The U.S. Life Saving Service, Lighthouses of San Francisco Bay, and more, with other works on the horizon. (M). $44.95.

2644. Belyk, Robert C. GREAT SHIPWRECKS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. New York. 2001. 276 p. DJ. Fascinating, never-before-documented stories of the worst shipwrecks on the Pacific Coast during the golden age of coastal transportation, 1854 to 1929. The eighty years spanning the California gold rush to the start of the Great Depression saw thousands of passengers and crews perish in Pacific steamship wrecks. In Great Shipwrecks of the Pacific Coast, author Robert Belyk looks beyond commonly provided-and frequently superficial-public explanations of weather conditions or human error, and closely examines ten significant maritime disasters that occurred along the Pacific coastline from California to Alaska. Filled with the drama of life and death aboard doomed ships, Belyk brings to life the struggles of real people caught in desperate situations when disaster strikes at sea. Illustrated with rare photographs and drawings. The shipwrecks accounted for here include: Yankee Blade: Wreck of a Gold Ship, Brother Jonathan: In the Teeth of the Dragon, Pacific: The Final Whistle, Rio de Janeiro: Death of a City, Clallam: The "Hoodoo" Ship, Valencia: Appointment with Death, Columbia: Disaster off Shelter Cove, Francis H. Leggett: Battle Lost, Princess Sophia: A Grave Error, San Juan: End of an Era. (F). $19.95.

2645. Hairr, John. NORTH CAROLINA LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING STATIONS. 2004. Arcadia Publishing. 128p. Soft wraps. With bold capes jutting into the ocean, sandy shoals extending miles offshore, fickle weather, and treacherous currents, it is no wonder that the coastline North Carolina came to be known as the “The Graveyard of the Atlantic.” For more than two centuries, these bright beacons of safety have guided ships into busy harbors, signaled dangerous navigational obstacles, and warmed the hearts of homesick travelers. North Carolina Lighthouses and Lifesaving Stations presents to readers the tales behind the lighthouses and life-saving stations, illuminating their past in both word and image. Through more than 200 archival photographs, stories of shipwrecks, rescues, service, and pride spring to life. Rare station and crew are especially noteworthy. (M).  $19.99.

2629. Clifford, J. Candace and Mary Louise. MIND THE LIGHT KATIE: THE HISTORY OF THIRTY-THREE FEMALE LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS. Alexandria. 2006. 144 p. 56 illustrations. Mary Louise and J. Candace Clifford’s book Women Who Kept the Lights: An Illustrated History of Female Lighthouse Keepers has been so popular the authors have prepared a condensed version for younger readers age 12 and up. The 144 women who served as principal keeper for more than a year are listed in the longer book. The 33 women presented here are those whose lives were recorded in logs, journals, official correspondence, newspaper articles and obituaries, and recollections by their children and grandchildren. Kateie was 44 years old when her son Jacob rowed his stepfather, John Walker, ill with pneumonia, to Staten Island for medical treatment. John’s last words to his wife were, "Mind the light, Katie." John, official keeper of the Robbins Reef Lighthouse, never returned. Although she was paid only a laborer’s wage, Kate faithfully minded the light until she finally received the keeper’s appointment in 1894. Her only communication with the mainland was by rowboat or through the periodic calls of the lighthouse tender bringing supplies. Assisted by her son Jacob, Kate kept the Robbins Reef Light until 1919. (M). $12.95. 

25381. Muller, Bob. LONG ISLAND’S LIGHTHOUSES – PAST AND PRESENT. Patchogue. 2004. 383p. Soft wraps. Long Island’s Lighthouses – Past And Present is the culmination of over five years of research and study from local and national sources. While several books have chronicled Long Island’s lighthouses, none have included all of the structures including those that have been lost over the years. Filled with stories and photos never before presented, as well as architectural plans and more. I particularly enjoy the images and information about the many LHS and Coast Guard keepers. Well done, an invaluable reference for the area. (M). Published at $25. Our price $23.95.  

23379. Hahn-Pedersen, Morten. DANISH NORTH SEA LIGHTSHIPS. Esbjerg . Denmark 1991 64 p. Soft wraps. Lightships are not uniquely Danish--floating lights have been placed at sea where fixed lights cannot penetrate for over a hundred years. Since the Second World War, technological developments have rendered them obsolete, but they have a fascinating history. This book is the most comprehensive on the subject yet written, with information about the ships' construction, life on board, the seamen who sailed them, and the potential tragedies the lightships have prevented. Filled with excellent vintage photographs. In English. (M).  $44.

2217. Department of Commerce. Lighthouse Service. INSTRUCTIONS TO LIGHT KEEPERS. Wash. GPO. 1911. 26 p. Nicely done reprint. Includes general instructions for all employees, instructions for Light-Keepers, instructions to all stations and vessels equipped with fog signals, instructions relating to light vessels, and much more. Includes all aspects of station and apparatus maintenance. A complete and important document. $8.55.

25230. MacAlindin, Bob. PRISONERS OF THE SEA. Milford Haven. 1999. 176 p. Soft wraps. The crews and the lightships that they manned were the prisoners of an alien environment. For the men it was, in the main, a voluntary exile, that was marginally better for a seaman than voyaging the seven seas and being away from their families for years. For the ships, anchored in one place at the mercy of the buffeting sea, it was a trail between their builder and nature. In spite of this the prisoners enjoyed sunny afternoons fishing and yarning, but were always ready, whatever the weather, to risk their lives to rescue less fortunate seamen whose ships had tried to impale themselves on the very mark that the light vessel was guarding them against. The author traces the development of these "prisons" from the early almost unseaworthy wooden hulks to the modern well founded, all steel, high-tech light vessel, and includes many stories from the crews´ point of view. (M). $29.95.

2232. Trapani, Robert Jr., INDIAN RIVER LIFE-SAVING STATION… JOURNEY ALONG THE SANDS… THE U.S. LIFE-SAVING YEARS, 1876-1915. Virginia Beach. 2002. 64p. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. This lovely addition to our library weaves the history of the Life-Saving Service into this account of life at the Delaware’s Indian River Inlet Life-Saving Station. Laid out chronologically, this booklet provides an intimate look at this station’s important history and its impact on the region. Includes over 55 wonderful photographs and color reproductions, keeper and crew accounts, shipwrecks, equipment and more. Nicely done. (M). $14.95.

25238. D’Entremont, Jeremy. THE LIGHTHOUSES OF CONNECTICUT. Beverly. 2005. Soft wraps. 192 p. With The Lighthouses of Connecticut, author Jeremy D’Entremont inaugurates a new series, "Lighthouse Treasury," which describes the fascinating history of our American lighthouses, state by state. There are 20 Connecticut lighthouses today, from Great Captain Island off Greenwich to Stonington Harbor at the Rhode Island border, and D'Entremont has unearthed everything from unassailable fact to improbable ghost story. He doesn't stop with the lighthouses we see today. The Lighthouses of Connecticut also has chapters on major lights that have disappeared, Sperry Lighthouse in New Haven Harbor and the Bridgeport Harbor Lighthouse, as well as a chapter on lightships and some smaller lights that once protected traffic on the Connecticut River. Read about:  The keeper at Green's Ledge Light off Norwalk, who went on a binge ashore, leaving his assistant nearly to starve to death. Two years later, the assistant's brother replaced him and, in an apparent act of revenge, abandoned the new head keeper, who nearly starved to death himself, or how isolation has driven keepers and their assistants insane. One keeper had to stay awake two days and nights, fending off his assistant, who threatened him with a razor lashed to the end of a spar, and much more. The Lighthouses of Connecticut is meticulously researched and copiously illustrated, with photographs from the author's enormous collection. (M).  $14.95  

2338b. Grant, John. STAYING AT A LIGHTHOUSE - America's Most Romantic Lighthouse Inns. Guilford. 2005. 104 p. Soft wraps. New Updated edition. Whether they were abandoned long ago or still stand as beacons in the fog, hundreds of lighthouses decorate the beautiful shores of North America. But only a few invite people to stay the night. Staying at a Lighthouse visits these unique overnight havens, offering a personal tour of the most sought-after landmarks in the country. A few of them operate as grand bed-and-breakfast inns. Others provide a more rustic experience, offering guests a retreat from the hustle and bustle of their daily lives. Still others allow visitors to assume the role of lighthouse keeper for a short time. But they all provide an experience that is romantic, renewing, and above all, memorable. Readers can step back in time at these and many other coastal towers: • Heceta Head Lighthouse, Oregon • East Brother Light Station, California • Sand Hills Lighthouse Inn, Michigan • Rose Island Lighthouse, Rhode Island • Saugerties Lighthouse, New York • Race Point Lighthouse, Massachusetts • Monomoy Point Lighthouse, Massachusetts • The Keeper's House Inn, Maine Information provided in each profile includes history of the lighthouse and the area, background of the present-day keepers, and a description of the accommodations and the guest experience, plus all pertinent practical contact details. (M). $11.95.  

26122. Tag, Thomas A. THE FRESNEL LENS MAKERS PART V – THE BARBIER, BENARD AND TURENNS (BBT) LENS WORKS. Dayton . 2006. 11 P. Soft wraps. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – The Fresnel Lens Makers Part V – The Barbier, Benard And Turenns (BBT) Lens Works. Part V of six parts, describes the development of the early Fresnel lenses and defines the companies and individuals who took part in this effort. Augustin Fresnel had assistance from many sources as he developed and perfected his lens. This part details the work of the Barbier, Benard And Turenns (BBT) in France. From its beginnings in the 1860’s  the company was one of the leading makers of Fresnel lenses for the world market, and to its current status as today’s Samtec-Gisman Company, still producing navigation buoys.  (M).  $26.

2659. Tag, Thomas A. THE FRESNEL LENS MAKERS PART IV - CHANCE BROTHERS GLASS WORKS. Dayton. 2006. Soft wraps. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – The Fresnel Lens Makers Part IV Chance Brothers Glass Works. Part IV of six parts, describes the development of the early Fresnel lenses and defines the companies and individuals who took part in this effort. Augustin Fresnel had assistance from many sources as he developed and perfected his lens. This part details the work of the Chance Brothers Company in England, from its beginning as a glass window maker to its production of Fresnel lenses for the world market, and to its final demise in 1977 after being divided into several companies.  (M).  $26.

25335. Tag, Thomas A. THE FRESNEL LENS MAKERS PART III THE HENRY-LEPAUTE LENS WORKS. Dayton. 2005. 8 p. Spiral bound. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – The Fresnel Lens Makers Part III The Henry-Lepaute Lens Works. Part III of five parts, describes the development of the early Fresnel lenses and defines the companies and individuals who took part in this effort. Augustin Fresnel had assistance from many sources as he developed and perfected his lens. This part details the work of the Henry-Lepaute Lens Works, in France, from its beginnings as a clock maker, to its production of Fresnel Lenses for the world market, to its current status.  (M). $26.

25216. Tag, Thomas A. THE FRESNEL LENS MAKERS PART II SAUTTER. Dayton. 2005. 10 p. Spiral bound. Thomas Tag has long been probably the only authority on lamps, lens apparatus and illumination for lighthouses, with his articles on the subject appearing in our catalogue, as well as the U. S. Lighthouse Society’s Keeper’s Log, Lighthouse Digest and other publications. Now Tom has added still another volume to his list of publications – The Fresnel Lens Makers Part II Sautter. Part II of five parts, describes the development of the early Fresnel lenses and defines the companies and individuals who took part in this effort. Augustin Fresnel had assistance from many sources as he developed and perfected his lens. This part details the work of the Louis Sautter Company, in France from its beginnings producing Fresnel lenses and other lighthouse equipment from 1852 to the company’s final demise in 1970. (M).  $26.

       

25213. Taylor, Thomas W. KEY WEST LIGHTHOUSE: A LIGHT IN PARADISE. 2005. 141 p. Soft wraps. Key West in the Florida Keys is the southernmost city in the continental United States. It history is replete with stories of pirates, hurricanes, and shipwrecks. Soon after Florida became a territory of the United States, lighthouse was built on Key West in 1826 to serve as a primary aid to navigation to help reduce the number of shipwrecks. This lighthouse was destroyed by the hurricane of 1846 but was replaced by a tower which survives today. Thomas Taylor’s new book Key West Lighthouse: A Light in Paradise brings to life the history of this unique lighthouse and the tropical setting in which it is located. The book includes a number of historic photographs of the lighthouse and details the lives of its keepers. Well done by this noted historian and writer. (M). $19.95.

25195. (4 DVD set) Victory at Sea series. Winner of both an Emmy and a Peabody, this legendary 1952 WWII documentary series drew from more than 13,000 hours of footage shot by the US, British, German, and Japanese navies. Narrated by Leonard Graves, with an original music score by Richard Rodgers, it spans American and Allied naval operations from Pearl Harbor to the Mediterranean, Murmansk to Mandalay. This award-winning documentary series is presented in its entirety and has been digitally remastered and restored for your viewing pleasure. Set includes all 26 full length episodes shown on TV, B&W and color; approximately 12 hours on 4 DVDs of original uncut action. Superb, stirring documentary and music that you will long remember. $39.95.  

  

25158. Evans-Hylton, Patrick. LIGHTHOUSES AND LIFESAVING STATIONS OF VIRGINIA. Arcadia Publishing. 2005. 128 p. Soft wraps. Created as navigational tools, lighthouses are of interest to more than mariners; the ruggedly romantic nature of the beacons delights and enthralls thousand of admirers. Lights along the Virginia coast are no exception. From the richly historic Old Cape Henry Light, authorized by President George Washington in 1789, to the candy-striped Assateague Light on the state’s Eastern Shore, lights along the Virginia shore enthrall thousand of admirers. Of equal interest are the tales of the men of the United States Life-Saving Service, the forerunner of today’s Coast Guard. Spaced along the shore, they aided navigation by responding selflessly to ships in distress, often at their own peril. Author Patrick Evans-Hylton has collected more than 200 archival images that capture the illuminating history of the silent sentinels of the sea and the valiant stories of heroic keepers and surfmen. (M). $19.99.

 

25151. Dougherty, Barbara Quillen. DEWEY BEACH HISTORY & TALES. Dewey Beach. 2005. 2nd. 144 p. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. The much anticipated second edition of Dewey Beach History & Tales is now available. Featuring 144 pages with approximately  300 photographs, maps, postcards & other images, this second edition of Dewey Beach History & Tales was compiled and edited by local historian Barbara Quillen Dougherty. The book includes numerous updates and historical information, as well as many new “tales”. The first edition, published in 1996, sold out in less than two years. In addition to a great deal on the Dewey Beach Life Saving station and crews, included are very informative articles about Dewey Beach in the 1920’s, 1930’s and 1940’s. Included with the book is a lovely Dewey Beach Life Saving Station note card with envelope. The author’s proceeds from the sale of Dewey Beach History & Tales was given to the Dewey Beach Life Saving Station. (M). $38. 

6264. Stackpole, Edouard A., LIFE SAVING NANTUCKET. Nantucket. 1972. 295pp. Hard cover, as new. DJ. A complete, definitive history of the life-saving services in this area, surrounded by shoals and known for its toll on shipping. Well illustrated with photos. Certainly one of the best and most interesting and complete sources on the subject. (M) $26.

 

    

2541. Tongue, Stephen D. LANTERNS & LIFEBOATS – A History of Thunder Bay Island. Alpena. 2004. 126 p. Soft wraps. “Magnificent desolation”, that is how early settlers described Thunder Bay Island. Just offshore from Alpena, Michigan, Thunder Bay Island boasts a life saving station which assisted in the rescue of over 1,000 lives and the second oldest lighthouse still standing on Lake Huron. The Thunder Bay life saving station opened in 1876, making it one of the earliest on the Great Lakes. Lanterns & Lifeboats the lighthouse and life saving station, their crews and the transition to the Coast Guard in 1915. (M).  $14.95.  

2558. Trapani, Robert Jr. LIGHTHOUSES OF NEW JERSEY & DELAWARE – History, Mystery, Legends and Lore. Elkton. 2005. Lighthouses Of New Jersey & Delaware presents stories and photographs of 20 lighthouses along the New Jersey and Delaware coasts. From Sandy Hook, N.J., to Fenwick Island, Del., Trapani's stories feature unusual incidents associated with each silent sentinel. Shipwrecks and suicides, storms and fires, invasions of beetles and cats, and even a few ghost stories and legends are spotlighted in this easy-to-read collection of short stories. Using historical photographs, U.S. Coast Guard documents, newspaper articles and personal interviews, Trapani has created an informative and interesting book that shares an import part of the region's history and lore. Particularly interesting are the accounts if the keepers’ lives, their difficulties and efforts to make do. (M). $11.95.

25137. Batchelor, John. NORTH AMERICAN LIGHTHOUSES COLORING BOOK.  New York . 1995. 47 p. Soft wraps. Enjoyable children’s coloring book includes 36 b/w drawings to color of lighthouses including  Cape Hatteras , Montauk Point, Cape Canaveral, Quoddy Head,  Point Reyes , and many others. Includes location map and history of each. (M). $4.95.

707h. Shanks, Ralph and Lisa Woo. GUARDIANS OF THE GOLDEN GATE. 1990. 318p. Hardcover. [new] "...Climb the iron stairways of San Francisco Bay’s lighthouses to re-light the ancient lamps...on the beach below, the rescue boats are being readied...more watches...more beaches to patrol...." Guardians of the Golden Gate is nearly three times larger than the author’s earlier work ‘Lighthouses of San Francisco Bay. All of the original stories are here, along with a rich treasure of countless new adventures. Illustrated with hundreds of vintage photographs, the Shanks’ wonderful work chronicles the work of San Francisco Bay’s Life-Savers and Light Keepers as never before. Wonderful reading. (M) Only a few left. Our price: Softcover $14.95.

2588. Karch, Mary. UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE – Memories of Barnegat City. Harvey Cedars. 2004. 80 p. Illustrated with 97 vintage photographs. This pictorial history of Barnegat Light is based on the memories of long-time residents who experienced the early days and changes in this small fishing village on the northern tip of Long Beach Island. Photographs and stories document the fishing industry, historic buildings, and of course its most famous landmark, Barnegat Lighthouse. This book combines images of a past almost forgotten with memories of the residents who will never forget the small town that was once called Barnegat City. (M). $18.95

2589. Buchholz, Margaret Thomas. NEW JERSEY SHIPWRECKS – 350 Years in the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Harvey Cedars. 2004. 200 p. New Jersey Shipwrecks takes us on a gripping voyage through the “Graveyard of the Atlantic,” a name bestowed upon the state’s treacherous shoals and inlets. From the days of sail to steam and oil, ships (and even submarines) have been drawn to this coast and, for thousands of vessels, it became their final resting-place. Early rescuers braved the seas, rowing small boats, using simple buoys and rope to help the wreck victims. Quoting from original documents, letters and reports, Shipwrecks reveals the sense of duty and service which prevailed in these brave rescuers; many devoted their lives — literally — to help save the men and women whose own lives were turned upside down in stormy Atlantic waters. From the early wrecks of the 18th century to the present day, the life-and-death drama of maritime disasters is captured in Shipwrecks, along with the history of the U. S. Lifesaving Service (later to become the Coast Guard), lighthouses, legends, and true accounts of heroism. One hundred and forty-two historic photographs and illustrations are included in this large-format hardcover. The book includes a listing of hundreds of other wrecks along the Jersey Shore. (M). Published at $44. Our Price $40.95.  

 

2512. Noble, Dennis. RESCUED BY THE UNITED STATES COAST GUARD - Great Acts of Heroism since 1878. Annapolis. 2005. 328 p. Although the U.S. Coast Guard enjoys a reputation as the best maritime rescue service in the world, details of its heroic history are not well known. Dennis Noble has corrected this oversight with a book that highlights dramatic rescues over the past century carried out from shore-based Coast Guard stations and aircraft and patrol boats. He writes about a day shortly before Christmas in 1885 when Keeper Benjamin Dailey and his U.S. Life-Saving Service crew rowed five miles in seas almost higher than the length of their boat to pick up shipwrecked sailors and then bring them safely to shore. He also describes a 1918 rescue when a USCG boat crew pulled through burning gas and oil to extricate sailors from a sinking tanker. Among the most memorable is Paul A. Langlois, who during the darkness of a gale swept night, maneuvered his helicopter around rocky pinnacles thrusting higher into the air then the helicopter, to rescue two people from a sailboat. But as Noble makes clear, not every rescue is successful and attempts that ended in deaths are included as well. Maritime rescue specialists and historians will be drawn to the author’s overview of the change in equipment and the array of aircraft used by Coast Guard lifesavers. (M). Published at $32.95. Our price $29.95.

6721. Jennings, Harold B., A LIGHTHOUSE FAMILY. Orleans. 1989. 1st. 118p. DJ. Signed by Author. A wonderful narration of boyhood memories while growing up at Lovell’s Island Lighthouse in Boston Harbor. A story of adventures, shipwrecks, storms, living without electricity and learning how to run a lighthouse combine to provide entertainment and a learning adventure. (F). $12.95. REDUCED to $9.71.

 

24353. Planisek, Sandy. RELIVING LIGHTHOUSE MEMORIES 1930’S – 1970’S. GLLKA. 2004. 253 p. Soft wraps.  Seventeen years after the publication of their first book "Living at a lighthouse," in 1987, the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association has published a second book of oral histories of USLHE and USCG keepers and their children titled "Reliving Lighthouse Memories." Profusely illustrated and edited by GLLKA Straits Coordinator Sandy Planisek, the 253-page book features fascinating and insightful stories in the words of those who lived the experiences. Includes memories of a Coast Guard electrician, lighthouse keepers, lighthouse children and more during the difficult period of automation and changing job descriptions.  Highly recommended. (M).    $13.95

LONG OUT OF PRINT!

 

The following book is no longer available in stores and I have long been searching for a few copies for stock. Finally I was able to pick up two at another out of print book store though they were quite pricey,  and I don’t expect to find any more in the future. This will certainly be your last opportunity to pick this title up for your library.

 9421. Gowdy, Jim & Kim Ruth. GUIDING LIGHTS OF THE DELAWARE RIVER AND BAY. Sweetwater, NJ., 1999. 296p. Soft wraps. Just released, this is the most comprehensive history ever written on the lighthouses, lightships, tenders and depots of the Delaware River and Bay – from Cape May to Gloucester City and Philadelphia to Fenwick Island . This detailed history was painstakingly research by the authors and is enhanced by more than 180 photographs and 25 illustrations. Using records from the National Archives, Coast Guard, and private collections this monumental work provides wonderful reading. The vintage photographs alone are a feast to the eye and offer previously unseen views of many of these interesting stations. Includes are views of a number these lights under construction, and some in the process of destruction. Also includes rare views of tenders, keepers, light vessels and much more. (M). $74.  

 

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