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13156. O'Connell, Wil and Pat. Lighthouses of Eastern Michigan. Arcadia. 2013. 128p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. From the Straits of Mackinac to the Detroit River, Lighthouses of Eastern Michigan reveals intriguing stories of lighthouses and the people who depended on them. Readers will enjoy discovering what happened when a large ship fell 20 feet over one of the Soo Locks and the captain commented, "Good-bye Old World," as well as of a persistent ghost that caused havoc with the Coast Guard. Which lighthouse was a construction miracle in 1874? And whatever happened to the lost lighthouses of the Detroit River? A collection of the mysteries, storms, fires, and heroics surrounding the lighthouses of eastern Michigan are waiting within. Authors Wil and Pat O'Connell have spent the last 20 years photographing and writing about the lighthouses of the Great Lakes. Their interesting volume draws images from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs of the stations, the men, equipment  and more, well worth it for the photos alone. (M). $21.99.

16107. (photo) U.S. Coast Guard Station, Tawas, Lake Huron c.1921. Nice clear photo shows this beautifully decorated 1875-type station as the Keeper and visitors pose for the camera. Photo measures 3 ½” x 5 ½”. Also includes another snapshot of young ladies posing, labeled Saginaw Bay 1921. Great station view. (VG+). $42.

16128. (photo) Lighthouse, Lake Michigan by Father Brana Kevich c.1990. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the 40ft white stucco lighthouse in Grafton by Father Brana Kevich. In 1981, Brana Kevich, an ordained Serbian Orthodox priest, and his wife Neva built a lighthouse home on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan to fulfill a personal quest to own and live in a lighthouse. The lighthouse, known as Kevich Lighthouse, stands just fifty-feet-tall, but has a focal plane of 163 feet, giving it the distinction of having the highest focal plane of any active lighthouse on the Great Lakes – only Boyer Bluff Light is higher. The U.S. Coast Guard certified Kevich Lighthouse as a Class II Private Aid to Navigation in 1990. Clear and close view. Dated February 15, 1990. Great view. (VG+). $28.

1690. (photo) Harbor Lighthouse, Marquette, Michigan c.1985. Clear, close original 8” x 10” press photo shows great detail of the catwalk leading to the lighthouse, completely covered with a thick coating of ice from high winds that sent waves crashing from lake Superior onto the walkway. Clear and close view. Dated December 7, 1985. Great view. (VG+). $34.

 

 

15123. na. Glen Haven Coast Guard Station Historic Structure Report. Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lake Shore. April 1980. 270. Soft wraps. Denver Service Center, National Park Service. Historic Structure Reports provide a valuable foundation for the rehabilitation, restoration, stabilization or reconstruction of historic structures. Such a report is particularly important for finding or fabricating significant missing architectural details and other items that would have been found on such structures, and for documenting the history and changes to such structures over time. This allows one to recapture the appearance of a property at one particular period of its history, removing later additions, or substantially modifying existing historic fabric. In this case, the Glen Haven Coast Guard Station including the 2-story main dwelling structure, boathouse #1, boathouse #2, fire cache, and signal tower were  studied using evidence present at the site, historical documents found at the National Archives, Life-Saving Service records, logs, reports, letters from the keepers and more. Using these and other sources, the authors are able to provide a detailed assessment of how the structures would have looked during the period of interest, and more. The report includes numerous period and current photos and diagrams, architectural plans, and excerpts from Life-Saving Service and Coast Guard books and documents, original specifications, and more for guidance. A most important reference for anyone interested in what the buildings would have contained and looked like. (M). $64.

 

15102. Keeper Hunter, J. Arthur. Daily Journals of a Light House Keeper at Petite Pointe au Sable Light House, Mears, Michigan 1900-1907, 1911-1915, 1916-1922. Copied by Vinetta B. Ling in three volumes from the originals 2000 - . Soft wraps. 689 pages. At Petite Pointe au Sable Light House, life was not lonely for Light House Keeper J. Arthur Hunter and Assistant Keeper George Chamberlin. Each evening one of them walked up the stairs to the tower to take first watch to make sure the light was on and stayed on. Mr. Hunter usually took first watch and Mr. Chamberlin went up about 2 AM for the second watch. Those could have been lonely hours, but there were books to read and letters to write. Often, if the children had no school the next day, the whole family was in the tower with Mr. Hunter. They read stories aloud, sang or talked. Sometimes friends came to visit. Each morning burners were changed, lens and clockworks cleaned and polished, stairs swept and windows washed. But if a horn was heard from the inspector's boat, all else came to a halt and everyone worked to make sure the place was clean and in order for the inspection. No, Petite Pointe au Sable Light House was not a lonely place. These three wonderful volumes, copied from the originals, tells the tale of life of the Keepers and their families at this remote station in their words, as written in the Keepers’ daily journals. Provides a rare insight into the keepers’ lives. Wonderful reading!  Clean, tight, lightly used. (VG+). Set $118.

7101c. Crowner, Gerald E., [Surfman, South Manitou Station 1926-1928]. THE SOUTH MANITOU STORY. 1982. 87p. Soft Wraps. Illustrated with 49 photographs. Inscribed by the author. A wonderful chronicle of the author’s work and life as a surfman at the South Manitou Station. Filled with details of the day to day life at the station as well as at the South Island Lighthouse. This is one of the few true day-to-day accounts available from the men who manned the oars and walked patrol. Quite interesting, well worth reading. (VG+). $44.

14157. Kotzian, John. Sky Pilot of the Great Lakes. Avery. 2008. 224p. Soft wraps. "Sky Pilot" was sailors' slang for a chaplain. This book tells the life story of the Reverend William H. Law, a story that has never been told before. The Reverend Law was in peril on the Great Lakes and was rescued by a U.S. Life-Saving Service Station crew. As a result of that rescue, seeing their heroic efforts first hand, Reverend Law dedicated the rest of his life to the men and women stationed at Light  stations and Life-Saving stations throughout the United States. Whether it was bringing his "Floating Library" to stations located on the Great Lakes, regular correspondence with the crews of stations far too remote for a personal visit, or his relentless pursuit of Congress to approve a bill to provide better pay and pensions, Reverend Law became a fast friend to those serving in the Lighthouse and Life-Saving services. To the men and women he served, Reverend Law was lovingly known as "The Sky Pilot of the Great Lakes." A tale of unconquerable optimism, the story of W. H. Law's life is as much the account of the brave men and women of the Lighthouse Service and Life-Saving Service as it is the saga of a long and rewarding life in the service of others. (M). $17.95. 

14178. Oleszewski, Wes. The Best of Wes Oleszewski - Favorite Great Lakes Shipwreck Stories. Avery. 2014. 202p. Soft wraps. The author has researched and written hundreds of Great Lakes Maritime stories over the years. He has personally chosen his "best" and is putting his favorites in the book True, factual stories of some of the most devastating Great Lakes shipwrecks ever documented. This book will take you through the 1800’s and the 1900’s, while in the shoes of the sailors, some lost, others forgotten, still others remembered as heroes. Huge waves, frigid weather and terrifying situations - relieve it all in this exciting book. A great read of classic Wes stories. (M). $16.95. (x)

 

 

13313. (lot 5 documents) Lighthouse Service, Inquiry as to Why Light and Fog Signal Not Operating, Poverty Island Light Station, Michigan c.1918. Lot of three typed documents regarding inquiries of Keeper by the Inspector12th LH District,  regarding the light and fog signal not operating on the nights of February 16 and 17, 1918, as well two additional documents regarding appointment of Assistant Keeper and an increase in pay for the keeper. Documents measure about 5” x 7 ½” and are quite tattered on the edges, with moisture staining and some deterioration about the margins. All are quite readable, are on official Lighthouse Service letter forms and still bear the signature in hand by the Lighthouse Inspector. These documents were found in the deteriorating remains of the Keeper’s house on Poverty Island in the 1960’s. The  contents are as follows: 

(February 23). The Inspector writes that he is “in receipt of a report stating that on the nights of February 16 and 17 neither your light nor your fog signal was in commission, notwithstanding the fact that it was snowing heavily part of the time. You are requested to report why your station was out of commission on those dates.” 

The keeper responded on March 1, for on March 5 the Inspector again writes: “Referring to your letter of March 1 …. You are requested to submit an exact copy of your Fog Signal Report and your station Journal for February 16th, 17th, and 18th. The question of whether or not you were derelicy in your duty on these dates will thereby be investigated. “

Again the keeper answered, this time to the satisfaction of the Inspector, for on April 26 the Inspector writes: “Referring to your letter of April 23, 1918, indorsed by Henry J. Wierzbach, 1st Asst. Keeper, in regard to certain complaints made against you by Mcaide: Your explanation of the reason for not blowing your fog whistle on February 16, 1918, is considered satisfactory; and you are hereby exonerated from all blame which might arise from such a complaint.” 

Two other documents during this period relate to appointments and pay: March 18, 1918. “To Keeper, Poverty Light Station. You are advised that the Department has approved the following temporary increase in salary…. Keeper $15 per month. 1st Assistant $2 peer month…” 

March 20, 1918. To Edwin C. Jacobson… You are advised that you have been nominated for appointment to the position of second assistant keeper of Poverty IslandLight Station. You will hold yourself in readiness to procede to that station upon advise from this office….” 

Great content, most interesting. Lot $185.

 

13190. Oleszewski, Wes. Shipwrecks!! Factual Accounts of Obscure Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2013. 176p. Soft wraps. True, factual stories of some of the most obscure Great Lakes shipwrecks ever documented. This book will take you from the 1820’s to the 1980’s, while in the shoes of the sailors, some lost, others forgotten, still others remembered as heroes. Huge waves, frigid weather and terrifying situations - relieve it all in this exciting book. (M). $17.95. (x)

 

13145. (photo) Mission Point Light Station, Grand Traverse, Michigan c.1927. Superb close, clear photo shows great detail of the Mission Point Lighthouse with the keeper standing by the front door. Mission Point Light was located at the end of Old Mission Point, a peninsula jutting into Grand Traverse Bay 17 miles north of Traverse City. When it was built in 1870, it was an exact copy of the Mama Juda Lighthouse (now destroyed), which was built on the Detroit River in 1866. For 67 years the light here served to warn mariners about the shoals off Mission Point. The keeper shown here is probably William F. Green or Emil C. Johnson, who served in the years between 1907 and 1933. Photo is printed on postcard paper and is dated 1927. The writer notes that she bought the photo card form the keeper at the “middle door at the back” in the photo. Clean, clear on postcard paper, 3 ½” x 5 ¼”. Excellent photo. (VG+). $68.

 

12366. Truman, Stephen, Grace & Joel. STORMS AND SAND - A Story of Shipwrecks and the Big Sable Point Coast Guard Station. Pine Woods Press. 2012. 208p. HC. Illustrated with 69 photos and illustrations. Great Lakes maritime history encompasses epic stories of heroic rescues, tragic losses, and changing times. Storms and Sand is a glimpse into the world of the brave men of the U.S. Life-Saving Service/ U.S. Coast Guard Station at Big Sable Point, Michigan. The station was located on land that is now part of Ludington State Park. The book tells the history of the station; including the sacrifices by the life-savers and Coast Guardsmen, and their courageous struggles in rescuing Lake Michigan shipwreck victims. Storms and Sand also chronicles lesser-known events in the lives of the men, their families, and the Big Sable Point lighthouse keepers. Great reading about an interesting area. (M).  $29.95. Available shortly - Reserve yours now. 

  

7399d. Noble, Dennis and T. Michael O’Brien. SENTINELS OF THE ROCKS - From “ Graveyard Coast ” to National Lakeshore. Marquette . 1979. 1st. 61p. Blue stiff wraps. This extremely scarce early work relates the story of the Au Sable and Grand Island Lights on Lake Superior , and the Grand Marais Life Saving Station and the Munising Coast Guard station. The authors touch on the Lighthouse Service, Life-Saving Service and early Coast Guard as well as their stations and equipment. With a forward by Prof. Loren R. Graham of MIT.  Appended are lists of Keepers of both the lighthouse and life-saving stations. Well illustrated with 34 photos and engravings. An extremely scarce title. (VG). $78.

10409. Quantz, Vivian DeRusha. Foghorns Save Lives Too - Lighthouse Living In Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Skandia. 1999. 77p. Soft wraps. Inscribed by the author. From the author: “This book was written for my grandchildren. I am the daughter of a lighthouse keeper and there are not many left who lived when the Lighthouse Service was active. This book tells of my life as a child. It is a story of the beauty and dangers of Lake Superior. At a time when lighthouses and foghorns were very important. when the faithfulness of Lighthouse Keepers saved lives and prevented tragedies. It is a story of freedom and adventure, sand dunes in summer and winter, lady slippers and arbutus, skipping rocks and finding agates, of hiking to places yet untouched by civilization. Memories of life lived as a Lighthouse Keeper's daughter.” While primarily aimed at younger readers, this book provides valuable insight into life at Whitefish Point light station. (VG+) $12.

     

1291. Stonehouse, Frederick. Steel On The Bottom - Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 224p. Soft wraps. Historical photos, maps, illustrations and underwater photos. Noted maritime historian Frederick Stonehouse recounts the final voyages of eight Great Lakes ships in this volume from Avery Color Studios, a firm specializing in Great Lakes-related books, posters, maps, etc. The ill-fated vessels chosen for inclusion share only the common trait of being steel-hulled ships whose loss tickled the author's fancy. They include a car ferry lost in 1910, a Netherlands freighter lost in 1953, a sand dredger lost in 1950 and so on. In most cases the ships succumbed to the terrifying storms that all too often sweep across the Great Lakes; the others collided in poor visibility. Yet in reading through these accounts, time and again human stupidity, incompetence, inadequate crew training, poorly done ship inspections and related factors played roles in the sinkings and/or excessive loss of life. Stonehouse does a good job of evoking the tedium, tension and sometimes stark terror of sailing the Great Lakes and enduring its vicious storms. Though none of these vessels will ever enjoy the notoriety of the Edmund Fitzgerald, their voyages and endings are well told in this book, which includes over 80 black & white photographs and maps. This book is sure to please both the Great lakes history and shipwreck buff. (M). $16.95.

1292. Stonehouse, Frederick. Wood On The Bottom- Great Lakes Shipwrecks. Avery. 2012. 208p. Soft wraps. Historical photos. A follow up to his very popular Steel On The Bottom, this well researched and well written shipwreck book focuses on wood ships that have met their demise on the Great Lakes. For many centuries wood was the preferred material for ships, both salt and freshwater. Masts, cabins, decks and hulls were all made from it. It was strong, resilient, easy to work with and inexpensive. Properly used and maintained, a wooden ship could last for many years. But it was no guarantee of safety as Wood On The Bottom proves beyond a doubt. Stress of storm, collision, poor navigation, bad luck and human folly all played a part in sending thousands of wooden ships to the bottom of the Great Lakes, where they are quietly rotting away into the ages. Wood On The Bottom tells the dramatic tales of a dozen wooden shipwrecks. Some like the Alvin Clark, Lady Elgin and Rouse Simmons (the infamous Christmas Tree Ship) are well known, but others, including the Persian, Oriole and Bon Voyage are cloaked by history. Another outstanding Stonehouse book. (M). $16.95.

BR-101. Stonehouse, Frederick. GREAT LAKES LIGHTHOUSE TALES. Gwinn , Michigan . 1998. 192p. Soft wraps. Lighthouse Tales, by one of the most respected authors on the subject, tells the exciting story of the human side of lightkeeping. It describes the deadly storms, killing fogs and numbing loneliness that those who “kept the lights” endured. Stories of wreck and rescue thread their way through this tribute to the “wickies” of a bygone era. Thoroughly illustrated with vintage photographs. (M). $7

29176. Castle, Beatrice Hanscom. The Grand Island Story. Marquette. 1974. 110p. DJ. Grand Island, the largest island along Lake Superior’s south shore, about one-half mile from the mainland community of Munising, Michigan. The first Settlers came to the Island in the early 1800's when trading for furs was the prime industry. Includes information on the Grand Island North Light (built in 1867), as well as the East Channel Lighthouse, shipping, settlement and more. (VG). $18.

20218d. Vent, Myron H. SOU TH MANITOU ISLAND : FROM PIONEER SETTLEMENT TO PARK. Springfield , Virginia . 1973. 105p. Soft wraps. Illustrated with vintage photographs. Contains a history of the Life-Saving Service on South Manitou Island , Michigan beginning in 1902 through the Coast Guard era. Also includes a similar history of the Lighthouse Service there, the work of the keepers and their families. Appended also are excerpts from the life-saving station log, a listing of keepers of the lighthouse, life-saving station and Coast Guard station, and much more. Great reading. Light wear. (VG-). $38.

926b. Anderson, Charles M., ISLE OF VIEW – A History of South Manitou Island . Frankfort , MI. 1979. 111p. Soft wraps. Having lived on the island for thirteen years in the early part of the century, the author developed an intimate knowledge of the area and a love of this lovely secluded island. For more than a century this area of Michigan has boasted a strong maritime presence and the work of the Coast Guard and lighthouse keepers here is second to none. In addition, the author’s personal friendship with the keeper of the Coast Guard station here provides an insight to their way of life. Quite a nice account of the life here with much lighthouse and life-saving material. Illustrated with photographs. (VG). $20.

(U. S. C. G. photo)

26203. Furst, Glenn C. [stepson of the Keeper of North Manitou Light Station].  MY POINT OF VIEW. Np. 1992. 121p. Soft wraps. Signed by the author. Illustrated with photographs. An engaging memoir of the author’s youth growing up on North Manitou Island, Michigan, during the nine years (1919-1928) that his stepfather was employed as the lighthouse keeper at North Manitou Light Station on Dimmick's Point on Lake Michigan. In 1928, the family was transferred to the South Manitou Station. Privately published in 1992 this soft cover volume, almost certainly the first and only edition, I found to be extremely interesting in its details of every day life. a rare glimpse into a place and time otherwise largely lost to history. Clean, tight, nice copy and the first that I have ever found. (VG+).  $88. 

7209. Shelton-Roberts, Cheryl, LIGHTHOUSE FAMILIES. 1997. 196p. Hard cover. Living in a lighthouse was a way of life for the families of more than 5000 keepers and employees of the United States Lighthouse Service. These quiet people faithfully manned their remote outposts and withstood enemy attacks, hurricanes, and dishonest bureaucrats while saving countless thousands of lives. These men, women and children daily experienced physical hardship, round-the-clock work, isolation, and danger - and the strong bond of family. Though the Lighthouse Service no longer exists, many of the children who grew up at these stations do and their stories are preserved for the first time in this remarkable book. Family tales from Pigeon Point California, St. Augustine Florida, Saddleback Ledge Maine, Old Mackinac Point Michigan, Morris Island South Carolina and many more. Illustrated with over 100 family vintage photographs and a beautiful full color photo of the light as it appears today. This is a book that you won’t want to put down. (M). Reduced! $22.46.

26354c. Williams, Elizabeth Whitney. A CHILD OF THE SEA; and LIFE AMONG THE MORMONS. Beaver Island Hist. Soc. Reprint of 1905 edition c.1970’s. 229p. Soft wraps. Illustrated. This is a memoir by Michigan 's first female lighthouse keeper concerning her personal experiences at the light station, and living among the 19th century Mormons on the island. The author (c.1844-c.1905) lived for thirty-one years on Beaver Island , Michigan and gathered as much knowledge of Mormon life as any one outside of their teachings could possibly have gotten. She combines tales and legends with her own memories to provide a charming account of the area and times. Photo illustrations include the following:   The Light House and Life Saving Station at Beaver Island Harbor, Michigan; James Jesse Strang, the Mormon King, King Strang's Residence; The Mormon Feast Ground at Front Lake, Beaver Island; The King's Highway, Beaver Island; The old Mormon Printing Office, now the Gibson House, at Saint James, Beaver Island, Michigan; Font Lake, Beaver Island where King Strang baptized his people; and Little Traverse Light House, at Harbor Point, Michigan. This is a facsimile reprint of the 1905 edition. Only light wear and sunning to wraps, contents clean and tight. Quite scarce. (VG).    $38.

 

9243i. THE UNITED STATES LIGHT HOUSE SERVICE – Its History, Growth and Methods. Part I. Scientific American Supplement. November 25, 1916. Superb four page article describes in some detail the history and particularly the operations of the Service. Part I includes history, organization and duties, jurisdiction, lighthouses, lighting apparatus and illumination, characteristics of lights, and more. Illustrated with fourteen detailed photos and illustrations including Cape Hatteras light, Ambrose Channel LV No. 87, Cape Henry fog signal, Minot ’s Ledge Light, and more. Also includes a fine full front page photo of the ice-incrusted light at Racine Harbor , Michigan in the winter. Full issue, clean, crisp. (VG+). $78.

9243d. THE UNITED STATES LIGHT HOUSE SERVICE – Its History, Growth and Methods. Part I. Scientific American Supplement. November 25, 1916. Superb four page article describes in some detail the history and particularly the operations of the Service. Part I includes history, organization and duties, jurisdiction, lighthouses, lighting apparatus and illumination, characteristics of lights, and more. Illustrated with fourteen detailed photos and illustrations including a full front page photo of the ice-incrusted light at Racine Harbor, Michigan, Cape Hatteras light, Ambrose Channel LV No. 87, Cape Henry fog signal, Minot’s Ledge Light, and more. First time I have had this important article. Full issue, clean, crisp. (VG+). $58.

9257d. THE UNITED STATES LIGHT HOUSE SERVICE – Its History, Growth and Methods. Part II. Scientific American Supplement. December 2, 1916. Two page conclusion of superb article describes in some detail the history and particularly the operations of the Service. Part II includes fog signal apparatus, submarine signals, buoys, light vessels, and more. First time I have had this important article. Full issue, clean, crisp. (VG+). $46.

2770. A Circular Steel Light Tower at Sturgeon Bay Canal. Engineering News and American Railway Journal. November 9, 1899. One third page article details the new type of lighthouse structure favored by the Light-House Board recently constructed at Sturgeon Bay on Lake Michigan. Article includes good detail of the design and construction of the iron light tower and lantern and includes a large 2-page supplement with photos and sectional views of the lantern and tower, stairway, foundation and more. The supplement measures 20 1/2" by 14 1/4" and is blank on the back. It has one fold in the center where it was folded to fit into the publication. The remaining journal is chock full of interesting articles including: The Heaviest Passenger Locomotive Ever Built (for the Lakeshore and Michigan Southern Railway), Early Railway Construction in the United States, Large Atlantic Cargo Steamers, A Centrifugal Railway for Pleasure Resorts, a couple articles on railroad signaling and more. Also included are engineering news bits and many interesting advertisements. Full issue, 10 ½” x 14 ¼”, 30 pages, clean save light edge staining. (VG). $48.

     

 

28119a. (architectural drawing) Cat Head. U.S. Light Vessels Nos. 51, 52, 53 and 54. December 8, 1891. F. W. Wheeler & Company ship-builders of West Bay City, Michigan. Original architectural drawing on linen measures 23 ½” x 36" and is hand drawn in two colors. Two views, one from top and one from side, show Cat Head as mounted on the deck of the lightship. The cat head is a beam projecting from each side of the bows of a ship, almost horizontally. It is designed for the purpose of raising the anchor from the surface of the water to the deck without touching the bows, and for carrying the anchor on its stock end when suspended outside the ship's side. It is furnished with sheaves at the outer end, and the inner end (which is called the cat's tail) fits down on the cat-beam. This original architectural drawing represents a great view into the design and construction of a portion of this style of lightship. The drawing is quite beautiful and would be wonderful for research or to frame for display. Extremely scarce. Verty good condition, clean crisp, no tears. (VG+). $68

28119b. (architectural drawing) Awning Stanchion, Full Size Sketch. U.S. Light Vessels Nos. 51, 52, 53 and 54. October 20, 1891. F. W. Wheeler & Company ship-builders of West Bay City, Michigan. Original architectural drawing on linen measures 11 ¾” x 28 ¾”  and is hand drawn in two colors. Four views, one from top and one from side as well as views of brackets, show stanchion that was mounted on the railing to support the canvas awning on the stern and midships of the vessel. This original architectural drawing represents a great view into the design and construction of a portion of this style of lightship. The drawing is quite beautiful and would be wonderful for research or to frame for display. Extremely scarce. Very good condition, bright, clean crisp, no tears. (VG+). $68

Similar: 

28119c. (architectural drawing) Full Size Mooring Chock. 17” x 27”. (VG+). $68

28119d. (architectural drawing) Copper Ventilators. 16” x 26”. (VG+). $68

28119e. (architectural drawing) Sluice Valves. 11” x 24”. (VG+). $68

28119f. (architectural drawing) Sheaves for 5/16 Chain. 14” x 18”. (VG+). $68

28119g. (architectural drawing) Sheave. 10” x 14”. (VG+). $68

28119h. (architectural drawing) Gasket for Barrel of Steering Gear. 14” x 16”. (VG+). $68

28119i. (architectural drawing) Lips for Scuppers. 11” x 11”. (VG+). $68

28119J. (architectural drawing) Stand for Boilers. 11” x 11”. (VG+). $68

28119k. (architectural drawing) (misc pieces) 11” x 47”. (VG+). $48

26324a. (Keeper appointment package) U. S. Lighthouse Service Keeper Appointment Letters and forms.  Whitefish Point Light Station, Michigan c.1911. Lot contains four pieces relating to the appointment of George Frederick of Shelby, Michigan to the position of Second Assistant Keeper of Whitefish Point Light Station, Michigan. The appointment letter is from the Inspector, 11th Lighthouse District and signed by the inspector appointing Mr. Frederick to the position. The second piece is signed by the Acting Chief Clerk, Washington and is the official probationary appointment, which would become permanent after six months on the job. Also included are official Circular No. 215 relating to political activity of officeholders. These three items are contained in the official franked envelope of the Light-House Establishment, 11th District and addressed to Mr. Frederick. Pieces are clean and crisp, with original folds, except envelope which has some early staining and light expected soiling. Extremely rare keeper’s appointment, suitable for framing or display. (VG). $245.

  

29108. (commemorative spoon) c.1900. Beautiful bold commemorative spoon bears a detailed engraved image of the U.S. Life Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan. The spoon is decorated in a gold wash and  features a highly-detailed engraved image of the Bibb #3-Type station built in 1887 and boat ramp, with their surfboat in the foreground. The spoon measures 5 7/8”  long with decorated handle and is in marvelous overall condition for its age, with surprisingly little surface wear. The gold washed bowl is enhanced by the bold handle decorated in raised relief. Nicely detailed commemorative piece and an extremely rare and desirable location, commemorating this interesting early life-saving station. Marked sterling. (VG+). $98 net.

11346. (photo) Detroit River Lighthouse, Michigan c.1949. Clear, close view, taken from the lighthouse tender’s mast head, provides a great view as the tender lowers station boat onto its cradle outside the Detroit River Lighthouse, Michigan. View includes lighthouse and equipment, as well as the tender’s deck. Great detail. Dated March 9, 1949. $42

 

27415. [paperweight] Commemorative glass paperweight – pin dish c.1900. Large heavy glass rectangular paperweight – pin dish featuring an early photograph of Light House and Fog Horn on Piers, Life Saving Service Crew, Outer Harbor, Michigan City, Indiana. This rare item features a detailed early photograph of the two lighthouses on the piers as the life-saving crew maneuvers their surfboat out of the harbor. Photo remains clear and sharp, but with some darkening or foxing. Overall in good condition, light wear. Unusually large size  4” x 7 3/8” x 1 1/8” h. One of the few such items of this desirable location that I have had. (VG-). $74 net.

2366b. [commemorative cup/custard] ] c.1900 An unusual, bright commemorative cup featuring a beautiful, detailed color image of the “Tawas Point Lighthouse, Tawas City, Michigan.” This bright, intricately decorated cup measures 2 ¼” high by 3” diameter, and is enhanced by a decorative gilt trim and creme colored cup body. Very clean, no cracks or checks, some wear to gilt trim. A pretty little item for your display of a rarely seen view. (VG+).              $58.

   

27461. (souvenir cup) Life Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan. c.1900. Rare, bright commemorative cup features a bright full color image of the Bibb #3 Type life-saving station as the crew drills in the surfboat in the foreground. This piece is unusual both for the subject and the deep cobalt blue coloration enhanced by gilt borders and trim. Marked “Made in Germany”. Clean, bright, only light wear. (VG+). $96.

   

27468. (commemorative creamer) A bright commemorative creamer featuring a beautiful clear, detailed full color image of the U. S. Life Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan. c. 1900. This piece is quite attractive, with bright color image of the Bibb #3 Type life saving station with distinctive lookout and boat ramp. This pretty piece measures 3 ¼”  in height and is quite pretty with the color image on the mixed white and sea green background. A very attractive piece in a rare form. Clean, bright, very little if any wear. (VG). $68 net.

             

27193. (commemorative vase) c.1890. Harbor Beach [Sand Beach] Life Saving Station, Harbor Beach, Michigan. Rare early form features a large full color image of the early 1879-Type Lake Huron station as the crew poses in front with their surfboat. Large full color image covers fully half of the surface area and provides good detail and an attractive form. The vase is tall, measuring 4 7/8” high by 2 ¼” in diameter at the base. This important Lake Huron station was built in 1881 and survived until only recently, when it was sadly demolished. Piece is clean, bright, no chips or cracks, little if any wear to gilded edge. An unusually difficult location to find, and quite nice for display. (VG+).        $210.

27195. (commemorative toothpick) c.1898. Harbor Beach [Sand Beach] Life Saving Station, Harbor Beach, Michigan. Rare early form features a large full color image of the early 1879-Type Lake Huron station as the crew poses in front with their surfboat. Large full color image covers fully half of the surface area and provides good detail and an attractive form. The vase is tall, measuring 4 7/8” high by 2 ¼” in diameter at the base. This important Lake Huron station was built in 1881 and survived until only recently, when it was sadly demolished. Piece is clean, bright, no chips or cracks, little if any wear to gilded edge. An unusually difficult location to find, and quite nice for display. (VG+).  $168.

2413. (souvenir spoon) c. 1900. Beautiful petite silver spoon bears an impressed image of U. S. Life Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan.” on the dish. This finely detailed little piece shows the ornate Bibb #3 Type station and boat ramp,  with the crew in the surfboat in front of the boat ramp. The handle of the spoon is edged with a decorative border and engraved with the initial “L” and “1903” on the obverse. Marked " Sterling ”, measures roughly 5 1/8" long and is in excellent condition. This is one of the nicer pieces, a beautiful, finely detailed little commemorative piece and a most rare item commemorating this interesting Great Lakes station. (F). $118 net.  

  

25179. [paperweight) c.1900. Heavy glass paperweight featuring an early c.1900 photograph of “U. S. Life-Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan”. This rare item features a close photograph of the 1887 Bibb #3 Type station on the north side of the harbor entrance. View includes the marine railway with two lifeboats visible inside the boatroom. The photo is clear and crisp, just a bit of fading from age and one small scratch. One of the few photo paperweights that I have ever found of this station. Paperweight measures 4” x 2 ½” x 1”h. (VG). $68.

25179b. [paperweight] c.1900. Heavy glass paperweight featuring an early c.1900 photograph of U. S. Life-Saving Station, South Haven, Michigan ”. This rare item features a close photograph of the 1887 Bibb #3 Type station on the north side of the harbor entrance. View includes the marine railway with two lifeboats visible inside the boat room. The photo is clear and crisp, just a bit of damage to one corner, glass chipped one corner. One of the few photo paperweights that I have ever found of this station. Paperweight measures 4” x 2 ½” x 1”h. Made for “William Tall. Jeweler… South Haven, Mich.” (VG).   $48.

  

 24129. (souvenir spoon) c. 1900. Beautiful petite silver spoon bears a relief image of the Light House Point, Marquette , Michigan.” on the dish. This finely detailed little piece shows a distant view of the lighthouse perched on the high bluff. A nicely detailed view, other buildings and landforms compliment the scene. The handle of the spoon is edged with a decorative border. On the top of the handle, there are various thistle plants impressed in the sterling. Marked " Sterling ”, measures roughly 5 1/8" long and is in excellent condition. This is one of the nicer pieces, a beautiful, finely detailed little commemorative piece and a most rare item commemorating this interesting Great Lakes station. (F). $68 net.

BR-124-60. (copy photo) Grand Marais Lighthouse, Lake Superior, Michigan with ice 40-feet high over the breakwater. National archives image. B/w digital print 7” x 9 ½”. $15.

 

 

CLEARANCE PRICED at Only $7.95 each:

Roberts, Bruce and Ray Jones. Over 80 color and b/w photographs. Soft wraps. Scarce early editions of this author’s earlier works covers the lighthouses along the coasts of the United States . The superb narrative and exquisite photography have made this lighthouse series repeated best sellers. Many signed by the author. (M).  

NORTHERN LIGHTHOUSES. New Brunswick to the Jersey Shore . 1990. 127p. (1)

772. NEW ENGLAND LIGHTHOUSES. Bay of Fundy to Long Island Sound. 1996. 101p. (3)

8227. MID-ATLANTIC LIGHTHOUSES – Hudson River to Chesapeake Bay . 1996. 86 p. (2)

8264. SOUTHEASTERN LIGHTHOUSES. Outer Banks to Cape Florida . 1998. 92p. (2)

SOUTHERN LIGHTHOUSES. Outer Banks to Cape Florida . 2002. 88p. (3)

SOUTHERN LIGHTHOUSES. Chesapeake Bay to Gulf of Mexico . 1989. 111p. (1)

8265. GULF COAST LIGHTHOUSES – Florida Keys to the Rio Grande . 1998. 92 p. (2)

8268. CALIFORNIA LIGHTHOUSES – Point St. George to the Gulf of Santa Catalina . 1997. 86 p. (2)

LIGHTHOUSES OF CALIFORNIA AND HAWAII Eureka to San Diego to Honolulu . 2002. 87 p. (5)

WESTERN LIGHTHOUSES. Olympic Peninsula to San Diego . 1993. 117p. (1)

21362. EASTERN GREAT LAKES LIGHTHOUSES. Ontario, Erie, and Huron. 2001. 87p. (1)

WESTERN GREAT LAKES LIGHTHOUSES. Michigan and Superior. 1996. 87p. (1)

23450. Hoyt, Susan Roark. LIGHTHOUSES OF SOUTHWEST MICHIGAN. Chicago. 2003. 128 p. Soft wraps. Lighthouses of Southwest Michigan takes the reader on an exciting journey through the history of seven light stations, from the St. Joseph, South Haven and Kalamazoo River lights to the Holland Harbor, Grand Haven, Muskegon and Whitre River Lights. Through a rare collection of archival photographs, this book explores these fascinating structures and the people who maintained them. (M). $19.99.

21457. Stonehouse, Frederick. WOMEN AND THE LAKES. Gwinn. 2001. 187p. Soft wraps. From lighthouse keeper and rescuer to deep sea diver or ship’s captain, women filled most every job of the Great Lakes maritime trade – both past and present. This interesting account by this noted maritime author relates many untold stories of these remarkable women. Storms, fogs, sickness, rescue – these heroic women were an inspiration. Includes tales of Rachel Wolcott, ,the first female keeper on the lakes, Elizabeth Williams of Beaver Island Light, Harriet Colfax at Michigan City Light, ,and much more. Well illustrated with over fifty vintage photographs. (M). $15.95.

21292. Bosman, Peter. LIGHTHOUSES & RANGE LIGHTS OF DOOR COUNTY, WISCONSIN. Ellison bay. 2000. 118p. Soft wraps. The Door Peninsula of Wisconsin juts northeastward between the waters of Green bay and those of Lake Michigan. There are more than 250 miles of shoreline and by 1900 Door County boasted more lighthouses than any other county in the United States. Though some lighthouses and range lights no longer exist this interesting booklet takes a look at each of the stations, as well as the lifesavers of the area, lighthouse administration, a visitors guide and more. Nicely illustrated by the author and family. (M). $9.

 

  

21105. Elve, Steven D., MICHIGAN CITY LIGHTHOUSE – GUARDIANS OF LAKE MICHIGAN. 2001. 128p. 200 vintage photographs. It was the year 1904, and the country was ready to re-elect former "Rough Rider" Teddy Roosevelt to another four-year term in the White House. For Thomas J. Armstrong, 1904 meant a new position as head keeper of the Michigan City Light Station. In this compact volume featuring over 200 early photographs dating from the 1909 through the 1920's, we see lighthouse life through the cameras and cards of lighthouse keepers Fred Dykeman, Thomas Martin and Thomas Armstrong. From the storm of 1913 that left the lighthouse practically burried, to the capsizing of the Eastland on its way to Michigan City, this interesting work offers a better understanding how the light keepers lived and worked along the shores of Lake Michigan. Another in the series from Arcadia, a well known publisher of local and regional histories, this volume drawns from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $21.99

2122. Peterson, William D., UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE IN MICHIGAN. 2001. 128p. 200 vintage photographs. Arcadia is a well known publisher of local and regional histories, including the popular Images of America series. This compact volume features over 200 early photographs dating from the 1870's through the 1940's, drawn from public and private collections, most never before published and traces the history of the Life-Saving Service in Michigan through photos and text. Includes Life-Saving Service on Lakes Michigan, Huron and Superior. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $21.99

 #20335. Stonehouse, Frederick. LIGHTHOUSE KEEPERS & COAST GUARD CUTTERS – Heroic Lighthouse Keepers and the Coast Guard Cutters Named After Them. Gwinn, Michigan. 2000. 272p. Soft wraps. Travel from Maine to California and hear the stories of fourteen heroic lighthouse keepers and what feats they performed to inspire the Coast Guard to honor them by naming a vessel after them. Included ate tales of shipwreck, desolation and loneliness, blinding fog and booming cannon, sturdy ships and blown out sales. The book covers the life and times of the keepers, their daily routine, and the lamps and lenses that they tended. Also included are the vessels themselves, their construction and the work that they perform. Different, most interesting, and another long needed tale of the keepers themselves. (M). $15.95.

10425. Majher, Patricia. Ladies of the Lights: Michigan Women in the U.S. Lighthouse Service. Univ. of Michigan Press. 2010. 120p. Soft wraps. Michigan once led the country in the number of lighthouses, and they're still a central part of the mystique and colorful countryside of the state. What even the region's lighthouse enthusiasts might not know is the rich history of female lighthouse keepers in the area. Fifty women served the sailing communities on Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior, as well as on the Detroit River, for more than 100 years. From Catherine Shook, who raised eight children while maintaining the Pointe Aux Barques light at the entrance to Saginaw Bay; to Eliza Truckey, who assumed responsibility for the lighthouse in Marquette while her husband fought for four years in the Civil War; to Elizabeth Whitney, whose combined service on Beaver Island and in Harbor Springs totaled forty-one years. The stories of Michigan's "ladies of the light" are inspiring. "Ladies of the Lights" pays long overdue homage to an overlooked part of Great Lakes maritime history. (M). Published at $22.95. Our price $21.50. 

  

10166. Harrison, Timothy and Walter C. Plohocky, BMCS, USCG Ret., Thunder Bay Island Lighthouse and Life Saving Station. Foghorn Pub. 2010. 32p. Soft wraps. This new book tells 3 different stories of the life on the small island of Thunder Bay near Alpena, Michigan.  First is "A Season On Thunder Bay Island" by former US Coast Guard lighthouse keeper Walter C. Plohocky, telling of life on the island for one complete shipping season, March through December. Also included is a history of the lighthouse and the story of Capt John and Celia Persons, the Icons of Thunder Bay Island. Well illustrated with historic photographs. Soft cover. (M). $8.95.

29329. Harrison, Timothy E. Ghost Lights of Michigan – Lost & Forgotten Lighthouses of the Great Lake State. FogHorn Publishing. 2009. 121p. Soft wraps. Michigan has the distinction of having more lighthouses than any other state. Fortunately, many of the state's historic beacons still stand. However, some lighthouses were destroyed and have literally been lost in the pages of time and forgotten by most. Others have been significantly altered and few people are aware of their original appearance. Researched and written by Timothy Harrison, editor of Lighthouse Digest magazine, this is like a time machine taking you back in history to a forgotten era. You will be captivated by the informative text and rare and historic images provided by Harrison, which are all that remain as a reminder of the Ghost Lights of Michigan. (M). $12.95.

   

28210. Grand Traverse Lighthouse Museum.  Grand Traverse Lighthouse. Arcadia Publishing. 2008. 128 p. Soft wraps. 200 vintage photographs. The Grand Traverse Lighthouse sits majestically at the entrance of Grand Traverse Bay , guiding vessels between Chicago and the Straits of Mackinac. For over 150 years, it has been an important beacon for all who have plied the waters of Lake Michigan . The original 1852 lighthouse was used for six years before being torn down. In 1858, a larger lighthouse with an attached nine-sided tower was erected on a site farther west. Over the course of its history, 66 lighthouse keepers, assistant keepers, and U.S. Coast Guard personnel have maintained the light. Today visitors tour the restored lighthouse, which is now a living museum filled with displays and exhibits depicting a simpler way of life. Another in the series from Arcadia , this volume draws from public and private collections, most never before published. Superb photographs, well worth it. (M). $19.99.

29205. Hawley, Jonathan P. Point Betsie - Lightkeeping and Lifesaving on Northeastern Lake Michigan . Ann Arbor . 2008. 250p. Soft wraps. 61 b&w photographs. Point Betsie: Lightkeeping and Lifesaving on Northeastern Lake Michigan is the compelling story of a key Great Lakes lighthouse whose beam has pierced night skies for 150 years. This rich history recounts the efforts of the U.S. Lighthouse Service, the U.S. Life-Saving Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard on Lake Michigan 's wreck-strewn northeastern coast, near the treacherous Manitou Passage. Much of Point Betsie's story is told in the accounts of dedicated keepers who served there with their families since 1858. Photographs also chronicle the lighthouse's expanding services through the years and the site's transition from early isolation to today's frequently visited attraction on Lake Michigan 's northeastern shore. The author devotes equal attention to the courageous lifesaving crews that served mariners off Point Betsie from 1877 to 1937. Keepers' logs bring to life the heroic rescues from wrecks that surfmen discovered while conducting their lonely night-time beach patrols, and document Point Betsie's central but previously untold role in the area's important maritime and social history. An illustrated, thoroughly researched history of dedicated lightkeeping and courageous lifesaving at Lake Michigan 's famed Point Betsie. (M). $29.95.

    

2789. THEY HAD TO GO OUT – True Stories of America’s Coastal Life Savers From The Pages of “Wreck & Rescue Journal”. Gwinn. 2007. Forward by Fred Stonehouse. 208p. Soft wraps. They Had to Go Out represents an unprecedented gathering works of talented historians working in the field of Life Saving Service history, taken from the pages of Wreck & Rescue Journal. Included are the writings of Ralph Shanks, Fred Stonehouse, Dennis L. Noble, Maurice Gibbs, and John Galluzzo.The stories reach from Massachusetts to Michigan to Washington, covering some of the accounts of bravado and selflessness of the men of the U. S. Life Saving Service, shedding more light on perhaps the most exciting aspect of America’s maritime history. (M). Published at $16.95. Our price $15.95.

  

26299. Hoyt, Susan Roark. LIGHTHOUSES OF NORTHWEST MICHIGAN. Chicago. 2004. 128 p. Soft wraps. Lighthouses of Northwest Michigan is a companion to the author’s first work Lighthouses Of Southwest Michigan. This work completes the history, covering the lighthouses on Lake Michigan’s eastern shore. When settlers first reached this area, rudimentary harbors in this area made docking and loading hazardous while shoals and reefs, hidden beneath the water's surface, threatened to ravage the unsuspecting vessels. The need for lighthouses to mark these dangerous waters and harbor entrances was crucial to prevent the loss of lives and valuable cargo. Through a rare collection of archival photographs, this book explores these fascinating structures and the people who maintained them. (M). $19.99. 

26208. Wardius, Barb and Ken. CANA ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE. Arcadia Publishing. 2006. 128 p. Soft wraps. The beautiful peninsula of Door County has a long and bountiful tradition of maritime history, including its many lighthouses, and the Cana Island has illuminated the coastline on the Lake Michigan side of Door County for over 100 years. The Cana Island Lighthouse is one of the most picturesque of any lighthouses still operating on the Great Lakes today. The Wardiuses’ interest in lighthouses began at Cana Island nearly 30 years ago. Today, their prints and photos carry the island’s history for future generations. Now they have put the island’s rich lighthouse history into a book, filled with more than 200 archival photographs of the light, keepers and their families, equipment, everyday routines and more. Rare station and crew images  are especially noteworthy. (M).  $19.99.

2338b. Grant, John. STAYING AT A LIGHTHOUSE - America's Most Romantic Lighthouse Inns. Guilford. 2005. 104 p. Soft wraps. New Updated edition. Whether they were abandoned long ago or still stand as beacons in the fog, hundreds of lighthouses decorate the beautiful shores of North America. But only a few invite people to stay the night. Staying at a Lighthouse visits these unique overnight havens, offering a personal tour of the most sought-after landmarks in the country. A few of them operate as grand bed-and-breakfast inns. Others provide a more rustic experience, offering guests a retreat from the hustle and bustle of their daily lives. Still others allow visitors to assume the role of lighthouse keeper for a short time. But they all provide an experience that is romantic, renewing, and above all, memorable. Readers can step back in time at these and many other coastal towers: • Heceta Head Lighthouse, Oregon • East Brother Light Station, California • Sand Hills Lighthouse Inn, Michigan • Rose Island Lighthouse, Rhode Island • Saugerties Lighthouse, New York • Race Point Lighthouse, Massachusetts • Monomoy Point Lighthouse, Massachusetts • The Keeper's House Inn, Maine Information provided in each profile includes history of the lighthouse and the area, background of the present-day keepers, and a description of the accommodations and the guest experience, plus all pertinent practical contact details. (M). $11.95.

     

2541. Tongue, Stephen D. LANTERNS & LIFEBOATS – A History of Thunder Bay Island. Alpena. 2004. 126 p. Soft wraps. “Magnificent desolation”, that is how early settlers described Thunder Bay Island. Just offshore from Alpena, Michigan, Thunder Bay Island boasts a life saving station which assisted in the rescue of over 1,000 lives and the second oldest lighthouse still standing on Lake Huron. The Thunder Bay life saving station opened in 1876, making it one of the earliest on the Great Lakes. Lanterns & Lifeboats the lighthouse and life saving station, their crews and the transition to the Coast Guard in 1915. (M).  $14.95.  

27303. Wardius, Barb and Ken. WIND POINT LIGHTHOUSE. Arcadia Publishing. 2007. 128 p. Soft wraps. Several lighthouses have called Racine home, but none is more synonymous with the nautical heritage of the “Belle City” than Wind Point. Always a beehive of activity, the Wind Point Lighthouse is one of the larger lighthouse complexes on the Great Lakes, and a hardworking keeper, two assistants, and their families made their livelihood here. For over 125 years, the tall stately tower has faithfully stood guard, shining its bright beam out over Lake Michigan nightly. Countless mariners relied on the Wind Point Lighthouse, along with a booming trademark foghorn for safe passage. Today the Wind Point Lighthouse is the most well-known symbol of Racine and is a success story among Great Lakes lights. The Wardiuses’ interest in lighthouses began nearly 30 years ago and today, their prints and photos carry the island’s history for future generations. Now they have put the rich lighthouse history into a book, filled with more than 200 archival photographs of the light, keepers and their families, equipment, everyday routines and more. Rare station and crew images  are especially noteworthy. (M).  $19.99.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light-House Service District Maps

10345. [Light-House Service District Maps]. U. S. Light-House Service. c. June 30, 1891. A rare opportunity to obtain an official U. S. Light-House Service District charts of all district aids to navigation as bound in their Annual Reports. Normally these charts are included within the Annual Reports and we are unable to offer them separately but we have found a lot of disbound charts in good condition. These are fine for matting and framing for your wall. Charts detail the entire Light-House District in three colors, and show all lighthouses, beacons, light vessels, fog signals, lighted buoys, Light-House Depots, and more. Charts average 8 ½” x 10” in size and are overall clean, may have very light stain,  with only one light original fold, light age toning. A rare chance to obtain the chart of your District for framing. (VG).

FIRST LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the head of navigation on the St. Croix River , Maine to Hampton Harbor , New Hampshire . Includes all of Maine and New Hampshire .  $44.

SECOND LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Hampton Harbor , New Hampshire to Elisha Ledge off Warren , Rhode Island . Includes all of Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard . $44.

THIRD LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Elisha Ledge off Warren , Rhode Island to and including a point on the coast of New Jersey opposite Shrewsbury Rocks.  $44.

PART OF THE THIRD LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Includes all of Lake Champlain . $18.

FOURTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From a point on the coast of New Jersey opposite Shrewsbury Rocks to and including Metomkin Inlet, Virginia. Includes New Jersey , Delaware , Maryland and Virginia .  $44.

FIFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Metomkin Inlet , Virginia to and including New River Inlet , North Carolina .  $44.

SIXTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From New River Inlet , North Carolina to and including Jupiter Inlet Light-Station, Florida . Includes part of North Carolina , all of South Carolina , Georgia , and Florida between the limits named. $44.

SEVENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From a point south of Jupiter Inlet Light-Station to Perdido Entrance , Florida . Includes all of the sea and Gulf Coasts of Florida .  $44.

EIGHTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Perdido Entrance , Florida to the Rio Grande, the southern boundary of Texas . Includes all of the Gulf Coast and lower Mississippi River .  $44.

NINTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Includes all of Lake Michigan, Green Bay and tributary waters.   $44.

TENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends from the mouth of the St. Regis River , St. Lawrence River , New York to and including Grassy Island, Detroit River, Michigan. Includes the waters of Lakes Erie and Ontario , and the upper part of the St. Lawrence, the Niagara, and the lower part of the Detroit rivers.  $44.

ELEVENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends from the Grassy Island Light Station, Detroit River , Michigan to the head of Lake Superior including the waters of Lakes St. Clair, Huron, and Superior and the upper part of the Detroit River , the St. Clair and St. Mary’s Rivers, and part of the Straits of Mackinac.   $44.

TWELFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the boundary between California and Mexico to the boundary between California and Oregon .   $44.

THIRTEENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the boundary between California and Oregon to the northern boundary of the United States and includes Alaska . Includes all of Oregon and Washington , and Alaskan waters.   $44.

U. S. Light-House Service District Charts - Large Size

20178. [Light-House District Maps]. U. S. Light-House Service. c. 1900-1908. A rare opportunity to obtain an official U. S. Light-House Service District charts of all district aids to navigation as bound in their Annual Reports. Normally these charts are included within the Annual Reports and we are unable to offer them separately but we have found a lot of disbound charts in wonderful condition. These are perfect for matting and framing for your wall. Charts detail the entire Light-House District in three colors, and show all lighthouses, beacons, light vessels, fog signals, lighted buoys, Light-House Depots, and more. Charts average about 16" x 20" in size and are clean and crisp, with only light original folds. A rare chance to obtain the chart of your District, ideal for framing. (VG+).

UNITED STATES. Outline Map shows all of the United States Light-House Districts with the more important lights noted. Includes all of continental United States and Alaska. $88.

FIRST LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the head of navigation on the St. Croix River, Maine to Hampton Harbor, New Hampshire. Includes all of Maine and New Hampshire. $88.

SECOND LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Hampton Harbor, New Hampshire to Elisha Ledge off Warren, Rhode Island. Includes all of Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. $88.

THIRD LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Elisha Ledge off Warren, Rhode Island to and including a point on the coast of New Jersey opposite Shrewsbury Rocks. $88.

PART OF THE THIRD LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Includes all of Lake Champlain. $44.

FOURTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From a point on the coast of New Jersey opposite Shrewsbury Rocks to and including Metomkin Inlet, Virginia. Includes New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia. $88.

FIFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Metomkin Inlet, Virginia to and including New River Inlet, North Carolina. $88.

SIXTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From New River Inlet, North Carolina to and including Jupiter Inlet Light-Station, Florida. Includes part of North Carolina, all of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida between the limits named. $88.

SEVENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From a point south of Jupiter Inlet Light-Station to Perdido Entrance, Florida. Includes all of the sea and Gulf Coasts of Florida. $88.

EIGHTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From Perdido Entrance, Florida to the southern boundary of Texas. Includes all of the Gulf Coast and lower Mississippi River. $88.

NINTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Includes all of Lake Michigan, Green Bay and tributary waters. $88.

TENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends from the mouth of the St. Regis River, St. Lawrence River, New York to the mouth of the River Rouge, Detroit River, Michigan. Includes the waters of Lakes Erie and Ontario, and the upper part of the St. Lawrence, the Niagara, and the lower part of the Detroit rivers. $78.

ELEVENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends from the mouth of the River Rouge, Detroit River, Michigan to the westerly end of Lake Superior including the waters of Lake St, Clair, Huron, and Superior and the upper part of the Detroit River, the St. Clair and St. Mary’s Rivers, and part of the Straits of Mackinac. $78.

TWELFTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the boundary between California and Mexico to the boundary between California and Oregon. $88.

THIRTEENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. From the boundary between California and Oregon to the northern boundary of the United States and includes Alaska. Includes all of Oregon and Washington, and Alaskan waters. $88.

FOURTEENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends on the Ohio River from Pittsburgh, Pa., to Cairo, Ill., on the Tennessee River 255 miles, and on the Great Kanawha 73 miles. $54.

FIFTEENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends on the Mississippi River from the head of navigation to Cairo, Ill., and on the Missouri River to Kansas City, Mo., and on the Illinois River from LaSalle to its mouth. $54.

SIXTEENTH LIGHT-HOUSE DISTRICT. Extends on the Mississippi River from the head of navigation to Cairo, Ill., to New Orleans, La., and on the Red River. $54.

LIGHT-HOUSE CHART. Includes West Indies between the Mona and Virgin Passages comprising Puerto Rico and dependencies, and all of the Hawaiian Islands. $38.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More items added daily. 

 

See also our recently updated Commemorative China page

Procedure to order items:

1. I suggest that you call us or email to check on availability of any item that you would like other than recent books. As items go quite quickly, please call and leave a message to reserve items that you would like. I will return your call, hold the items and await your letter or credit card information. We will also weigh the items and advise postage. 

2. You may then call or email credit card information, or forward a check in the mail.

Most items are mailed US Priority Mail or UPS. Additional information on our "Ordering Page".

Massachusetts residents must add 6.25% sales tax.

 

Page updated July 08, 2017 .

How to reach us:
Kenrick A. Claflin & Son Nautical Antiques
1227 Pleasant Street, Worcester, MA 01602 

Phone (508) 792-6627

All text and illustrations on web site Ó James W. Claflin . 07/08/2017 All rights reserved. Use prohibited without written permission.

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