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Featured on our web site and in our monthly web catalogues are new and out-of-print books, documents, post cards, photographs, maps and charts, engravings, lithographs, uniforms and insignia, tools, lamps, lens apparatus, equipment and apparatus and much more relating to these heroic services.

  

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U.S. Coast Signal Service Items...

For additional items please see our many other pages as well. 

The U. S. Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports.

 

15271a. (mounted photo) U.S. Signal Service Station, Morris Island, South Carolina c.1890’s. Measures 6” x 8” on 11” x 14” mat. The US Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. In the later 1870’s, some forty odd observation stations were established in the principal cities of the country. The organization was sufficiently complete so that on the 1st of January, 1871, regular reports of weather observations taken synchronously were telegraphically reported to the Washington office. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. After the turn of the century this organization would become the U.S. Weather Bureau. This rare photo shows the small signal station on the coastline of Morris Island, SC. Great detail includes Whole Gale warning flag flying as the station crew poses for the camera. Photo clean and clear. Mat has some light soiling, light edge wear. (VG). $110.

15271b. (mounted photo) U.S. Signal Service Station, St. Simons Island, Georgia c.1890’s. Measures 6” x 8” on 11” x 14” mat. The US Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. In the later 1870’s, some forty odd observation stations were established in the principal cities of the country. The organization was sufficiently complete so that on the 1st of January, 1871, regular reports of weather observations taken synchronously were telegraphically reported to the Washington office. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. After the turn of the century this organization would become the U.S. Weather Bureau. This rare photo shows the small signal station on the coastline of St. Simons Island, GA. Great detail includes warning flag flying as the station crew poses on the roof lookout for the camera. Photo clean and clear. Mat has some light soiling, light edge wear, two 1” chips to edge of mat. (VG). $100.

15271c. (mounted photo) U.S. Signal Service Station Headquarters, Charleston, South Carolina c.1890’s. Measures 6” x 8” on 11” x 14” mat. The US Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. In the later 1870’s, some forty odd observation stations were established in the principal cities of the country. The organization was sufficiently complete so that on the 1st of January, 1871, regular reports of weather observations taken synchronously were telegraphically reported to the Washington office. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. After the turn of the century this organization would become the U.S. Weather Bureau. This rare photo shows the large headquarters building of the Signal Service at Charleston, SC. Great detail includes Whole Gale warning flag flying from the flag mast. Photo clean and clear. Mat has some light soiling, light edge wear. (VG). $85.

 

  

29368.(lot 4 photos) United States Signal Service Station. Circa early 1900’s. The Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. In the later 1870’s, some forty odd observation stations were established in the principal cities of the country. The organization was sufficiently complete so that on the 1st of January, 1871, regular reports of weather observations taken synchronously were telegraphically reported to the Washington office. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. After the turn of the century this organization would become the U.S. Weather Bureau. Great lot of four photos show rarely seen details of a signal station, roof signal tower with man signaling by semaphore, and even a rare interior view of the station. Photos measure 3 Ό” x 4 ½” and are b/w. (VG). Lot 4 photos $84. 

 

29368c. (lot 8 glass projection slides) United States Signal Service Stations c.1878 - 1898. Excellent  lot of 8 b/w glass projection slides provide rare views at Coast Signal Stations on the Atlantic Coast. Stations include Montauk Point, Quogue, NY., Block Island at Southeast Light, Fire Island, Cape Henlopen. The Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. In the later 1870’s, some forty odd observation stations were established in the principal cities of the country. The organization was sufficiently complete so that on the 1st of January, 1871, regular reports of weather observations taken synchronously were telegraphically reported to the Washington office. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. After the turn of the century this organization would become the U.S. Weather Bureau. These views are exceptionally rare and provide unprecedented details of these remote outposts including the buildings, roof signal tower with men signaling, and more. The glass slides measures large 3 Ό” x 4” and would provide a large clear view. Fine, clear images, close, quite detailed, rare. In original box. (VG+). Lot 8 slides $595.

 

7278c. THE NEW YORK SIGNAL SERVICE STATION. Scientific American. November 2, 1889. 2p. The U. S. Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications with ships at sea, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. Also, they were charged with recording and coordinating meteorological and ocean observations. This is a very clear, detailed full front page with four engravings depicting the station and equipment of the United States Signal Service. Includes complete article describing their apparatus and their work. Unusual detail, some wear and chipping to edges. (VG).  $42.

 

5200. The following official pamphlets or publications of the U. S. Life-Saving Service are available in photocopies either individually or as a complete set.

A.       MORTAR AND BEACH APPARATUS DRILL. U. S. Life-Saving Service. 1880. 13pp. $2.60
B.        BEACH APPARATUS DRILL. U. S. Life-Saving Service. 1883. 15 pp. $3.00
C.       [same] 1890 (1st Ed). 27pp. $5.40
D.       [same] 1890 (2nd Ed). 27pp. $5.40
E.        COAST SIGNAL SERVICE OFFICIAL DANGER AND DISTRESS SIGNALS. 1878. 12pp. $2.40
F.        RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD ON LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES. 1882. 6pp. $1.20
G.       [same] 1890. 6pp. $1.20
H.       [same] 1892. 6pp. $1.20
I.          ABSTRACT ON THE TRIAL OF LIFE-SAVING APPARATUS. 1882. 7pp. $1.40
J.         REPORT OF THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT ON THE TRANSFER OF THE LIFE-SAVING SERVICE             TO THE NAVY DEPARTMENT. 1883. 5PP. $1.00
K.       REPORTS IN REGARD TO THE TRANSFER OF THE BUREAUS AND DIVISIONS OF THE TREASURY            DEPARTMENT TO THE NAVY DEPARTMENT. 1883. 69pp. 13.80
L.        Kimball, Sumner I., ORGANIZATION AND METHODS- U. S. LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 1890. 33pp. $6.60
M.       O'Connor, William D., THE U. S. LIFE-SAVING SERVICE. 1889. 19pp. $3.80

           [complete set of 13 publications] Spiral-bound photocopy $45.

 

744. Navy Department. REGULATIONS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COAST SIGNAL SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES. Wash. 1898. 18pp. The Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. Regulations  identify districts and stations, duties and discipline, care of stations and property, daily drills and routine. Includes a complete listing of stations. (Photocopy $3.60)

23226. Maury, Professor T. B., THE TELEGRAPH AND THE STORM. THE UNITED STATES SIGNAL SERVICE. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. c.1870. 21 p. The U. S. Signal Service was organized to open and maintain communications, to note the development and progress of storms, to predict probable future atmospheric conditions and to report on the conditions of the sea and navigable rivers. Signal Service Stations were established in connection with lighthouses and life-saving stations, connected by telegraph and offered communications to ships at sea by light or flag (and later by radio). They also summoned assistance to vessels in distress from the nearest life-saving stations or ports. Excellent account of the work of this little-known agency. (Photocopy $5).

22279. [ U. S. Signal Service]. Beltzhoover, Hon. Frank E., speech of Hon. Frank E. Beltzhoover of Pennsylvania in the House of Representatives. Wash. 1883. 41 p. Text of lengthy speech endorses the work of the Signal Service and advocates a number of changes in its organization and duties. In addition mention is made of its’ relationship with the U. S. Life-Saving Service and discusses the area of communications which that service too might benefit from. (Photocopy $8.20)

3168. U.S. Signal Service Agency. OFFICIAL DANGER, DISTRESS AND STORM SIGNAL CODES FOR SIGNAL SERVICE SEA-COAST STATIONS AND MARINERS. Wash. GPO. 1883. 91pp. Lists all pennant and light signals recognized by all sea-coast signal stations, and by the Life-Saving Service. Also lists all United States Life-Saving stations and Signal-Service stations. With plates and diagrams. (Photocopy $18).

4170. HISTORY OF THE SIGNAL SERVICE with Catalogue of Publications, Instruments and Stations. Washington City . 1884. 39pp. Includes a complete history of the U.S. Signal Service as well as a listing of stations. Soft wraps. Illustrated. (Photocopy $7.80).

 

 

 

 

More items added daily. 

 

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1. I suggest that you call us or email to check on availability of any item that you would like other than recent books. As items go quite quickly, please call and leave a message to reserve items that you would like. I will return your call, hold the items and await your letter or credit card information. We will also weigh the items and advise postage. 

2. You may then call or email credit card information, or forward a check in the mail.

Most items are mailed US Priority Mail or UPS. Additional information on our "Ordering Page".

Massachusetts residents must add 6.25% sales tax.

 

Page updated August 05, 2016 .

How to reach us:
Kenrick A. Claflin & Son Nautical Antiques
1227 Pleasant Street, Worcester, MA 01602 

Phone (508) 792-6627

All text and illustrations on web site Σ James W. Claflin . 08/05/2016 All rights reserved. Use prohibited without written permission.

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